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By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2013
Broadmead, a continuing-care retirement community in Hunt Valley, has "been so much than just a place to work," said retiring CEO Rich Compton. He has served as the company's leader for almost three decades. During that time, his parents came to live at Broadmead and his children worked their first jobs there. He's seen the aged-care business transformed into a highly regulated business. He's also witnessed how the different expectations each generation has for a retirement facility shape how they are marketed and run. As he prepares to leave Broadmead at the end of June, The Baltimore Sun asked him to share his thoughts on the state of the continuing care industry and its future.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
Cynthia L. "Cindy" Howl, a retired registered nurse and a lifelong Green Bay Packers fan, died May 23 of complications from diabetes at her Broadmead retirement community home in Cockeysville. She was 54. The daughter of Paul Peterson, who had been medical administrator at Eisenhower Medical Center in Palm Springs, Calif., and Sharon Peterson, a homemaker, Cynthia Lee Peterson was born in Milwaukee and moved to Palm Springs when she was a teenager. She graduated in 1977 from Palm Springs High School and earned her bachelor's degree in 1986 from the University of Minnesota School of Nursing.
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NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | October 18, 2013
Two seniors met for the first time at the Broadmead retirement community cafeteria Oct. 7. One was Libby Murphy, 83, a longtime Roland Park area resident, who has lived at Broadmead in Cockeysville for almost two years. The other was Mackenzie Gerrity, 17, of Stoneleigh, a senior at Friends School. Gerrity, wearing her Friends lacrosse jacket, was there as a biographer, to tell Murphy's life story in two or three pages for a nonfiction creative writing class project, or as Murphy explained, "to put it in black and white.
BUSINESS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2014
If it wasn't for the large, well-equipped woodworking shop at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville, Lawrence Schneider might never have embarked upon his third career as a sculptor. But when Schneider moved into the Hunt Valley community 10 years ago, he found an extensive studio for residents featuring a top-notch table saw, a large lathe and a floor-to-ceiling vacuum to suck up the dust. He also discovered his longtime hobby had aesthetic merit. "Previously, I never thought of what I was doing as art," the 79-year-old said.
EXPLORE
June 6, 2011
On Monday, Baltimore County Police formally requested the public's help identifying two suspects who last month robbed the PNC Bank inside the Broadmead retirement community, in the 13800 block of York Road. Police say that on May 19, at about 2:15 p.m., two suspects approached the teller area, jumped over the counter, and pushed the teller down. The suspects removed an undisclosed amount of money from the teller's drawer, and fled from the location through a rear door. The suspects are described as black males, 20 to 30 years old, with a medium build, and dark complexion.
NEWS
February 14, 1991
This letter was sent to President Bush by 75 residents of Broadmead, a retirement home in Cockeysville. Another letter, calling for a cease-fire in the Middle East, was signed by 54 residents.AS RESIDENTS of a retirement home, we are old enough to have seen many wars. Our experience leads us to believe that the expected benefits of war seldom, if ever, justify the human suffering, the increased animosity and the physical devastation that inevitably result. We therefore believe that it is generally to the advantage of all parties to find peaceful solutions to conflict.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | February 23, 2006
Catherine G. Motz, a founder of the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville, died there Saturday of complications from colon cancer. She was 90. Born Catherine Grauel in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park, she was a 1932 Western High School graduate who met her husband, John E. Motz, while both were attending a Christian Science Sunday school. They married in 1936, and he later became president of Mercantile-Safe Deposit & Trust and also was involved in local charitable institutions, including heading the board of the Greater Baltimore Medical Center.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 25, 1999
A resident of Broadmead died yesterday after she was struck by a car on the Hunt Valley retirement community's parking lot, said Officer Chris George, a Baltimore County police traffic investigator.Mildred Gelstharp Burdette, 82, was walking in the parking lot near the main entrance to Broadmead in the 13800 block of York Road about 4: 40 p.m. when she was struck by a 1996 Toyota Camry, George said.A female resident was backing the Toyota out of a parking space, he said.George said Burdette, who used a cane, suffered head and leg injuries and was taken by a county Fire Department ambulance to Sinai Hospital in Northwest Baltimore, where she died at 5: 44 p.m.George said the county state's attorney's office was reviewing the accident.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 29, 2012
On the 94-acre campus of Broadmead, a retirement community, there is an immediate sense that this isomething very different from preconceived notions about senior life residences. Instead of multistory buildings tucked into the hills of Hunt Valley, little clusters of cottages have been designed and built on the property. Each cluster of one-story bungalows is like a small court of homes in a quaint village, albeit one that is rich in wildlife, nature trails and the protected wetlands of Western Run. Rhoda Dorsey's cottage is located in the newest group of homes.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2003
Little Charlie has gone north to his vacation home in Maine. Big Charlie, Bucky, Gertie, Harry and the rest of the dog group at the Broadmead retirement community are celebrating summer the same way they celebrate every season: by gathering at their spot in the meadow, near the vegetable garden, right on the edge of the so-called wetlands, for their daily walk. The Broadmead Dogs form an amiable pack: Lab, standard poodle, Norwich terrier, bichon frise, Jack Russell terrier, Japanese Chin, Australian shepherd.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | October 18, 2013
Two seniors met for the first time at the Broadmead retirement community cafeteria Oct. 7. One was Libby Murphy, 83, a longtime Roland Park area resident, who has lived at Broadmead in Cockeysville for almost two years. The other was Mackenzie Gerrity, 17, of Stoneleigh, a senior at Friends School. Gerrity, wearing her Friends lacrosse jacket, was there as a biographer, to tell Murphy's life story in two or three pages for a nonfiction creative writing class project, or as Murphy explained, "to put it in black and white.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
Harry Blumenthal, a Jewish refugee from Nazi Germany who became an engineer and an ardent opera fan, died Aug. 12 of a stroke at the Broadmead retirement community. He was 89. The son of shopkeepers, Harry Blumenthal was born in Limburg, Germany, and was raised in Weyer and later in Bad Camberg, Germany. After Kristallnacht, a wave of anti-Jewish pogroms on Nov. 9-10, 1938, Mr. Blumenthal and his parents were able to secure visas to leave Germany. They left Bad Camberg in 1940 and after making their way to Genoa, they boarded the Manhattan, which took them to New York City, where they settled in Washington Heights.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2013
PETA is calling on a Cockeysville retirement community to let its pet finches spread their wings and leave the cage. The animal rights organization, which alleges the birds are being kept in inhumane conditions, is urging its members to contact the management at Broadmead. The retirement home says the animals are well cared for and are a highlight for residents. PETA first raised concerns about the birds a decade ago, said Dan Paden, a senior researcher at the organization. A Broadmead resident complained to management this spring, Paden said, and the group got involved again.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2013
Broadmead, a continuing-care retirement community in Hunt Valley, has "been so much than just a place to work," said retiring CEO Rich Compton. He has served as the company's leader for almost three decades. During that time, his parents came to live at Broadmead and his children worked their first jobs there. He's seen the aged-care business transformed into a highly regulated business. He's also witnessed how the different expectations each generation has for a retirement facility shape how they are marketed and run. As he prepares to leave Broadmead at the end of June, The Baltimore Sun asked him to share his thoughts on the state of the continuing care industry and its future.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2012
Evelyn S. Coyle, who owned and operated a northern Baltimore County farm with her husband and was a longtime volunteer at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center, died Saturday of heart failure at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. She was 101. The daughter of a real estate salesman and a homemaker, the former Evelyn Sheats was born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park. After graduating in 1928 from Forest Park High School, she studied at Strayer's Business College.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2012
Vera R. Carnes, a homemaker who earlier had been a bookkeeper, died Saturday of a stroke at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. She was 94. Born in Baltimore and raised on 33rd Street, Vera Miller attended the Bryn Mawr School and graduated from Eastern High School. She attended the College of William & Mary and in 1938 married Dr. William J. Rysanek Jr., a Baltimore obstetrician and gynecologist. Mrs. Carnes was the bookkeeper for her husband's private medical practice, said her son, William J. Rysanek III of Raleigh, N.C. He died in 1978.
NEWS
November 5, 2003
Ruth C. Wylie: A memorial service for Ruth C. Wylie, former chairwoman of the Goucher College psychology department, will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday at Broadmead Center at the Broadmead Retirement Community, 13801 York Road in Cockeysville. Dr. Wylie, 83, died at Broadmead on Oct. 21 of pneumonia.
BUSINESS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2014
If it wasn't for the large, well-equipped woodworking shop at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville, Lawrence Schneider might never have embarked upon his third career as a sculptor. But when Schneider moved into the Hunt Valley community 10 years ago, he found an extensive studio for residents featuring a top-notch table saw, a large lathe and a floor-to-ceiling vacuum to suck up the dust. He also discovered his longtime hobby had aesthetic merit. "Previously, I never thought of what I was doing as art," the 79-year-old said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2012
David Luke Hopkins Jr., first president and CEO of Brown Investment Advisory and Trust Co., died May 23 of heart failure at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. He was 84. The son of D. Luke Hopkins Sr., who was president and chairman of Maryland National Bank, and a homemaker, he was born in Baltimore and raised in Ruxton. After graduating in 1946 from St. Paul's School in Concord, N.H., he earned a bachelor's degree in 1950 from Princeton University, where he played varsity football and was a member of the Ivy Club.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 29, 2012
On the 94-acre campus of Broadmead, a retirement community, there is an immediate sense that this isomething very different from preconceived notions about senior life residences. Instead of multistory buildings tucked into the hills of Hunt Valley, little clusters of cottages have been designed and built on the property. Each cluster of one-story bungalows is like a small court of homes in a quaint village, albeit one that is rich in wildlife, nature trails and the protected wetlands of Western Run. Rhoda Dorsey's cottage is located in the newest group of homes.
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