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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2012
Weijia Jiang, who came to WJZ-TV in June of 2008 as a reporter, is leaving to join WCBS-TV in New York City. Both stations are owned by CBS. New York is the top market in the country. Jiang came to WJZ from WOBC-TV in Salisbury. She has a bachelor's degree from the College of William & Mary and a master's in broadcast news from the University of Syracuse. Born in China, Jiang grew up in West Virginia where her parents immigrated when she was 2. Jiang, whose last day at WJZ is May 31, will be replaced by Rochelle Ritchie, a multimedia reporter from WPTV in West Palm Beach, Florida.
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NEWS
By Gregory Rodriguez | June 9, 2014
Newspapers are in trouble. Not just because of the Internet and advertising and subscriptions. But because, according to a recent Pew Research Center poll, only 28 percent of Americans think that journalists contribute a lot to society's well being. That's pretty bad considering that journalists like to think of themselves as guardians of democracy. In other business enterprises, such public disdain would be a cause for alarm. But newspapers are different. Criticize journalistic professionalism, and you're likely to hear a thing or two about the importance of the First Amendment, or my favorite catch-all self-justification: If people are unhappy with us, "we must be doing something right!"
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2013
I have been writing a lot about Al Jazeera since the Qatar-based news operation bought Al Gore's wreck of a channel in January to gain access to some 50 million U.S. homes. When the purchase was made, I'm the guy who wrote: "Why Al Jazeera's purchase of Current TV is a good thing for media, country. " And before you start saying crazy, uninformed stuff about Al Jazeera and terrorism, read this piece: "Of course, Al Jazeera has a bias, but it's not what you might think.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2013
I have been writing a lot about Al Jazeera since the Qatar-based news operation bought Al Gore's wreck of a channel in January to gain access to some 50 million U.S. homes. When the purchase was made, I'm the guy who wrote: "Why Al Jazeera's purchase of Current TV is a good thing for media, country. " And before you start saying crazy, uninformed stuff about Al Jazeera and terrorism, read this piece: "Of course, Al Jazeera has a bias, but it's not what you might think.
NEWS
By Gregory Rodriguez | June 9, 2014
Newspapers are in trouble. Not just because of the Internet and advertising and subscriptions. But because, according to a recent Pew Research Center poll, only 28 percent of Americans think that journalists contribute a lot to society's well being. That's pretty bad considering that journalists like to think of themselves as guardians of democracy. In other business enterprises, such public disdain would be a cause for alarm. But newspapers are different. Criticize journalistic professionalism, and you're likely to hear a thing or two about the importance of the First Amendment, or my favorite catch-all self-justification: If people are unhappy with us, "we must be doing something right!"
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2013
Sinclair Broadcast Group's billion-dollar bet on seven ABC affiliates and a regional news network in Washington, D.C., hinges on a plan to transform that network into a national enterprise. Sinclair would use NewsChannel 8 to create a unique hybrid model for cable television news, blending national and international coverage with local news customized for each market. But the channel's success is far from certain, broadcast experts say, and depends on many unknowns, including Sinclair's ability to persuade cable operators to carry the network and the appetite of viewers and advertisers for more news.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | April 13, 1992
In the relatively small number of films which seriously tackle television as a social influence, two stand out: the powerful "Network" of 1976 and "Broadcast News" of 1987.And the latter, airing at 8 tonight on ABC (Channel 13), is worth another look because the most acute insight of "Broadcast News" got lost in all the big-hit excitement. (The film was nominated for seven Oscars.)Do you recall the James L. Brooks' movie? It was far less a rant than "Network" (by writer Paddy Chayefsky and director Sidney Lumet)
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | June 17, 1991
Call it the battle of the syndicated stars.Oprah Winfrey, Larry King, Joan Rivers, Geraldo Rivera, Dennis Miller, Sally Jessy Raphael, Maury Povich and Pat Sajak are all expected to drop by Baltimore this week during a broadcasting conference that began yesterday at the Baltimore Convention Center.Ms. Rivers, Mr. Rivera and Mr. Miller will be here tonight for a private party at the Inner Harbor Rusty Scupper sponsored by Tribune Entertainment, the producer and syndicator of their shows. Mr. Rivera, ever the self-promoter, will arrive on a boat bearing the logo of his new fall show, "Now It Can Be Told."
NEWS
By JEAN LESLIE | November 1, 1993
It's coming to you live, from Ellicott City, Maryland! It's produced by people who are probably much younger than you are, but perhaps more savvy in the ways of technology.It's (applause please!) "Dunloggin This Morning!"The brainchild of last year's eighth-graders Dan Schneider, Matt Holmwood, Dan Buchner and Dan Pick, Dunloggin Middle School's daily TV broadcast began late last spring with a crew of seventh- and eighth-graders.Now, the experienced crew of eighth-grade producers continues working in the studio, which occupies most of Gifted and Talented Program resource teacher Penny Zimring's classroom.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 30, 1998
Walter Cronkite was there cracking lame jokes and telling us how President Kennedy would have felt. Dan Rather was in full "Texas Dan" mode, calling people "hoss" and analyzing how much "giddyup" there was in those rocket boosters. Tom Brokaw and Brian Williams were giving new meaning to the word "gush."It was a big day on Planet Spectacle in the galaxy of television news yesterday as John Glenn, the 77-year-old Democratic senator from Ohio, joined six astronauts aboard the space shuttle Discovery.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2013
Sinclair Broadcast Group's billion-dollar bet on seven ABC affiliates and a regional news network in Washington, D.C., hinges on a plan to transform that network into a national enterprise. Sinclair would use NewsChannel 8 to create a unique hybrid model for cable television news, blending national and international coverage with local news customized for each market. But the channel's success is far from certain, broadcast experts say, and depends on many unknowns, including Sinclair's ability to persuade cable operators to carry the network and the appetite of viewers and advertisers for more news.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2012
Weijia Jiang, who came to WJZ-TV in June of 2008 as a reporter, is leaving to join WCBS-TV in New York City. Both stations are owned by CBS. New York is the top market in the country. Jiang came to WJZ from WOBC-TV in Salisbury. She has a bachelor's degree from the College of William & Mary and a master's in broadcast news from the University of Syracuse. Born in China, Jiang grew up in West Virginia where her parents immigrated when she was 2. Jiang, whose last day at WJZ is May 31, will be replaced by Rochelle Ritchie, a multimedia reporter from WPTV in West Palm Beach, Florida.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | June 2, 2008
He's not exactly journeying into a brave new world, but Bill Fanshawe clearly gets a kick out of being something of a pioneer. Today his TV station becomes the first in Baltimore to broadcast its local newscasts in high definition, meaning that viewers will be able to see anchors Jeff Barnd and Jennifer Gilbert more clearly than ever. Welcome to the future, TV watchers. "I don't know if it's the same as going from black and white to color, but it's comparable," says Fanshawe, general manager of WBFF (Channel 45)
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,sun reporter | February 16, 2007
Alayna Newsome beat her alarm clock by a half-hour and woke up at 6:57 a.m. energized and excited. Even though it would be seven hours until the camera would roll, the St. John's Parish Day School third-grader was pumped. Alayna, of Woodbine, had spent the past week combing Web sites for current events and perfecting her poise as she prepared to read a news script in front of her classmates. This year, third-graders at the private Ellicott City school have gained a greater appreciation for broadcast journalists, current events and public speaking through a required newscast presentation.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 3, 2004
Trading razzle-dazzle for responsibility, television news at least initially took the high road during last night's election coverage. Despite competition from the Internet, the networks and all-news cable channels held to their promises to proceed with caution before declaring the night's winners. The result was a report that often resembled an over-long fifth-grade civics lesson. "Folks, I just want to emphasize something about tonight: We would rather be last than wrong," said CBS anchorman Dan Rather just after the first polls closed at 7 p.m. "We are going to be very, very cautious as the evening goes along - and we are going to try and have transparency."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 26, 2004
When AFI Silver presents the American University Reel Journalism Film Festival this weekend in Silver Spring, it will feature several personal-appearance coups at high-profile revivals. For example, today's 7 p.m. kick-off of Broadcast News (1987) features a Q&A with 48 Hours Investigates executive producer Susan Zirinsky - the model for Holly Hunter's whip-smart producer in James L. Brooks' savvy dramedy. But some of the best movie-watching will come without add-ons, like the first two features tomorrow.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 3, 2004
Trading razzle-dazzle for responsibility, television news at least initially took the high road during last night's election coverage. Despite competition from the Internet, the networks and all-news cable channels held to their promises to proceed with caution before declaring the night's winners. The result was a report that often resembled an over-long fifth-grade civics lesson. "Folks, I just want to emphasize something about tonight: We would rather be last than wrong," said CBS anchorman Dan Rather just after the first polls closed at 7 p.m. "We are going to be very, very cautious as the evening goes along - and we are going to try and have transparency."
FEATURES
By Kevin Canfield and Kevin Canfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 2003
SECAUCUS, N.J. - MSNBC is coming up on its seventh birthday, but the network that promised to give viewers the best of the merged resources of NBC News and Microsoft is still casting about for an identity. As any news junkie knows, CNN's relatively stable lineup and brand-name hosts have made it the esteemed (if stodgy) graybeard of the genre. And Fox News, with its testosterone-fueled rants and its right-of-center polemics, has become the channel of choice for many conservative viewers.
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