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By Cox News Service | July 4, 2007
Nearly half of all Americans have high-speed Internet service at home, but the growth rate for "broadband" service is slowing sharply, and it's still uncommon among poor and rural residents, according to a new study. About 47 percent of adult Americans surveyed by the nonprofit Pew Internet & American Life Project said they have high-speed Internet service at home, up from next to nothing at the start of the decade. The rate of growth for broadband service adoption, however, was only 12 percent for the one-year period ending in March.
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NEWS
By Philip Spevak, Stan Wilson and Anthony Gill | July 1, 2014
There is a monopoly for fast Internet services in Baltimore City. As a consequence, a new Comcast customer can pay as much as $1,000 more over two years for standard "triple-play" service (telephone, Internet and cable television) than would a new customer in Annapolis, where competition exists. And the fastest Internet speed offered by Comcast in Baltimore is only one-third of what is currently available in Annapolis and most of the state. We pay more for less in Baltimore because fast fiber optic technology - often called fiber to the premises (FTTP)
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2010
Maryland will get $115 million in federal stimulus money to build a high-speed broadband Internet system that will link Oakland to Ocean City, congressional and state leaders said Friday. The grant, the second largest of its kind in the country to date behind one received by West Virginia, will help Maryland connect the patchwork of fiber-optic networks that currently run through each of its 24 jurisdictions. The broadband funding will result in vastly improved Internet speeds for local government offices, schools, hospitals, and emergency communication networks across Maryland, officials said.
NEWS
By Ev Ehrlich | March 4, 2014
The proposed merger between Comcast and Time Warner highlights the vast gap between the imagined world the broadband industry's critics and the real world in which these companies must compete. For years, the critics have advocated forcing companies such as Verizon and Comcast to share their infrastructure with their competitors or mandating that the broadband market only offer one level of service. Their argument is that America's broadband is gripped by a "cable/telco duopoly" that uses its market power to slow innovation and gouge the consumer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By William L. Watts and William L. Watts,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 8, 2004
WASHINGTON - The decisive issues of the 2004 presidential election battle: Iraq, the war on terror, job creation and ... broadband? Well, maybe it won't serve as a candidate litmus test for many voters, but President Bush and Democratic challenger John Kerry have pledged to make expanded access to high-speed Internet an important component of their economic plans. Bush offered no details on the broadband strategy. Kerry, who unveiled a corporate tax plan in the first of three speeches on economic policy, said he would soon lay out his approach to boosting broadband access.
NEWS
By Deborah Taylor Tate | August 9, 2009
The Federal Communications Commission now has a full complement of five commissioners, bringing decades of professional experience to the task of overseeing the dynamic information, communications and technology sectors that make up one-sixth of our national economy. Their first major assignment is to develop a congressionally mandated nationwide broadband plan. That process has begun, although unfortunately much of the $7 billion in federal stimulus funds appropriated to further increase broadband deployment and adoption will already have been distributed by the time the FCC's plan is released early in 2010.
NEWS
By Harold Furchtgott-Roth | August 5, 2002
THE DOWNFALL of WorldCom is just the latest in a series of calamities that has befallen U.S. telecommunications companies in the past two years. Most telecommunications companies did not need to resort to clever accounting tricks. They failed or faltered the old-fashioned way: They were simply unprofitable, sometimes as the result of vague and constantly changing government rules. The telecommunications sector is in chaos. Companies left and right are either moribund, bankrupt or desperately trying to avoid those conditions.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2011
Leasing office space in this economy can be a challenge, especially in older buildings, but Taylor Fields is working on getting an edge: a super-fast fiber-optic broadband connection. "One of the first things [prospective tenants] ask is what kind of Internet service we have," said Fields, a Timonium-based commercial leasing agent for the James F. Knott Realty Corp. "They all want fast Internet. " As work begins on a fiber-optic broadband network that will connect every Maryland school, hospital, police station — and even more public buildings — businesses also want to get involved.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | March 23, 2006
LAS VEGAS -- It will take huge, expensive changes to upgrade telecommunications networks to handle a new era of services. BellSouth's chairman and chief executive, F. Duane Ackerman, said yesterday that the key is to keep building -- and to keep the government from layering on regulations that he fears will stifle the process. Ackerman, in a speech at an important industry conference in Las Vegas, echoed themes laid out a day earlier by AT&T Chairman and CEO Edward E. Whitacre Jr. AT&T is buying BellSouth in a landmark deal that will help redraw the telecom landscape.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | May 13, 2007
Significant parts of Carroll County - particularly the more rural, less populated areas - lack broadband Internet access, which threatens to hamper economic development, said Lawrence Twele, county director of economic development. Broadband generally refers to any mode of high-speed Internet access, whether through DSL, cable modems or fiber-optic cable. Residents or businesses without broadband service generally have to use dial-up Internet connections. Even on the outskirts of Westminster, the developing Air Business Center and West Branch Trade Center on both sides of Route 97 have inadequate broadband coverage, Twele said.
NEWS
By Jim Clark | February 19, 2014
As parents, we spend countless hours trying to keep our kids balanced, so that they get just the right mix of physical and mental stimulation. Sometimes that means limiting their computer and Internet time so they can play outdoors or focus on something other than a screen. I know I hear myself say this at least three times a week at home with my own two children. But what about kids who don't have as much digital access as ours? What about kids who don't own computers, whose families don't subscribe to broadband at home or who have to go to the library just to finish their homework?
NEWS
September 4, 2013
Sen. Catherine Pugh's commentary, "Municipal broadband's false promise" (Aug. 16), is flawed by many serious errors and omissions. Whoever is advising her on this issue is doing her and the people of Baltimore a disservice. Senator Pugh claims that municipalities "keep building expensive networks that fail to attract customers. " In fact, the national average take rate of public fiber networks (39 percent) is virtually indistinguishable from that of companies such as Verizon and AT&T (40 percent)
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
Students and teachers at Woodlawn High gathered Wednesday as Baltimore County officials announced their school would be part of a regional high-speed broadband fiber optic network project meant to increase Internet speeds, improve access to data and save money. The school is one of 46 in the county that will be part of the project, which will eventually connect 115 sites and allow the installation of wireless technology in schools and other buildings. Officials said the initiative would save the county between $1 million and $1.5 million a year in Internet and phone bills.
NEWS
By Catherine Pugh | August 15, 2013
For many local governments, the promise is seductive. A cottage industry of consultants and network builders — who stand to profit handsomely — sell the idea to misty-eyed government officials that building a municipal broadband network will spawn a local Silicon Valley microcosm that will be a monument to their incumbency. But what they don't see is that the economics of the grand venture doom it to likely failure. For the most part, municipally-built broadband networks have the economic chips stacked against them and, where tried, have saddled local taxpayers with a mountain of debt and half-built networks that are then sold at fire-sale prices to vulture investors.
NEWS
July 29, 2013
AT&T and T-Mobile's decisions to allow more frequent device upgrades ("New AT&T plan to allow customers phone upgrades once a year," July 16) is further evidence of the growing competition for consumers in the wireless market. Soon there will be four national providers of 4G LTE service that offers mobile broadband speeds of up to 20 Mbps - speeds fast enough for virtually any video or other Internet application. Most Americans can also choose between telephone and cable broadband providers.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
Baltimore's six historic public markets should be equipped with Wi-Fi before the year's end, the city's new Chief Information Officer said Thursday. Chris Tonjes, who runs the Mayor's Office of Information Technology, said it should cost less than $25,000 to equip five markets - Avenue, Broadway Market, Cross Street, Hollins and Northeast - with the service. The upgrade of Lexington Market - the city's best known and first to receive the upgrade - will be funded by a donation from Believe Wireless Broadband, which is giving the city the equipment and bandwidth for the project, officials said.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | February 24, 2010
H ere's an economic development contest Baltimore can win. The headquarters of defense contractor Northrop Grumman is unlikely to relocate to Pratt Street or anywhere else in Maryland. But there is every reason to believe Baltimore can persuade Google to spend tens of millions of dollars to give homes, schools, companies and hospitals what would be among the fastest Internet connections in the world. Google announced the project on its blog two weeks ago - a plan to build "ultra high-speed broadband networks in a small number of trial locations across the United States."
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | August 9, 2007
You can't watch TV, listen to the radio or read a newspaper today without being bombarded by ads for broadband Internet service. Cable and telephone companies are in a ferocious battle for market share, and they're all bragging about how fast they are. Unfortunately, they're usually exaggerating. In fact, the gap between advertised and actual performance may be so great that it doesn't matter whether you choose cable, DSL or fiber-optic service. If your online life is mainly limited to Web browsing and e-mail, any broadband provider will deliver acceptable speed.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2011
Phoenix-based Altius Broadband said Tuesday that it had signed a contract to begin construction on a wireless broadband service network in four eastern Kentucky counties. The company will work with the Breathitt, Estill, Lee, and Powell Regional Technology Authority on the project. Altius won a request for proposal to build out the broadband network in the rural areas of Breathitt, Estill, Lee and Powell counties, according to a statement. The contract allows the construction phase of the project to begin.
NEWS
By Kweisi Mfume | August 15, 2011
When we think of the technological advances of the past 20 years, one in particular will probably come to mind for most Americans: wireless technology, which now enables us to access the Internet from anywhere. But when most Americans think of the top uses for the wireless Internet, health care is probably not the first thing on that list. Perhaps, in the near future, it will be. The current revolution in medicine will use the full potential of technology to transform medical practice to save lives and improve health.
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