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By Phoebe Flowers and Phoebe Flowers,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | August 6, 2004
The problem with the average romantic comedy is just how dumb it's likely to be. This is hardly a secret; Hollywood fortunes have been made by throwing together a cute woman and an unthreatening man and making them deliver a few tired battle-of-the-sexes jokes. In the rare case that the movie manages to be unconventional in even minor ways, it's something of a triumph. So, let's hear it for lowered standards, and, by extension, Little Black Book. Brittany Murphy stars as Stacy, who's got an entry-level job at a Jerry Springer-ish talk show and a cute boyfriend, Derek (Ron Livingston)
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By Phoebe Flowers and Phoebe Flowers,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | August 6, 2004
The problem with the average romantic comedy is just how dumb it's likely to be. This is hardly a secret; Hollywood fortunes have been made by throwing together a cute woman and an unthreatening man and making them deliver a few tired battle-of-the-sexes jokes. In the rare case that the movie manages to be unconventional in even minor ways, it's something of a triumph. So, let's hear it for lowered standards, and, by extension, Little Black Book. Brittany Murphy stars as Stacy, who's got an entry-level job at a Jerry Springer-ish talk show and a cute boyfriend, Derek (Ron Livingston)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 15, 2003
Uptown Girls desperately - a little too desperately - tries to wring laughs from the plight of two emotionally stilted young women. Twentysomething Molly Gunn (Brittany Murphy) is a strange breed of debutante: Her father was a legendary rock singer who died while on tour, and the trust fund he left behind has been enough to allow his daughter to live comfortably as the toast of New York's high-society party scene. Irrepressibly irresponsible, Molly specializes in making a mess of her life, then waiting for someone else to come and clean things up. A crooked accountant and a suddenly depleted trust fund, however, conspire to force Molly into the real world.
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By Terry Armour and Terry Armour,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 18, 2003
Brittany Murphy is a self-proclaimed goof ball. "Oh, yeah - I'm a big old goof," she says, giggling as she takes in the sights of the Magnificent Mile from a horse-drawn carriage. "So the fact that someone is paying me to be one kind of blows my mind." Murphy is talking about her latest film, Uptown Girls, which opened nationwide Friday. She plays the spoiled rich daughter of a deceased rock star who, after being swindled out of her inheritance, takes a job as the nanny of a precocious kid (Dakota Fanning)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 4, 2003
Spun wants to be The Lost Weekend of drug movies, but for movie-lovers it will merely mark a frittered-away afternoon or evening. It follows a speed freak named Ross (Jason Schwartzman) through three rancid Southern California days when he provides wheels for a methamphetamine chef known as, naturally, the Cook (Mickey Rourke) - a bad ol' boy who's the most potent figure in a grotty extended group of crank addicts. The gang includes the Cook's girlfriend, Nikki (Brittany Murphy), her gal pal Cookie (Mena Suvari)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 28, 2001
Don't Say A Word packages male hysteria so slickly there isn't an ounce of real life in it. Michael Douglas stars as a high-powered New York psychiatrist who specializes in problem adolescents. On the evening before Thanksgiving he agrees to treat a teen-age patient (Brittany Murphy) in a psychiatric hospital - only to find on Thanksgiving morning that he has to crack her case by 5 p.m. Bad guys have kidnapped his 8-year-old daughter and will kill the precocious tyke if the shrink doesn't retrieve a secret number from Murphy's scrambled brain.
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By David Hunter and David Hunter,The Hollywood Reporter | July 19, 1995
A hilarious "clued-in" comedy about cellular-phone-packing Beverly Hills high schoolers, Amy Hecker- ling's "Clueless" sports a terrific cast, sparkling dialogue loaded with slang and a hip soundtrack of pop tunes. OK, it's also plotless and borderline brainless, but that won't stop the Paramount release from cashing in substantially with the teen-age and young adult crowd.Alicia Silverstone ("The Crush") plays rich, spoiled, sweet-natured Cher, our guide into a world where self-assured but likable brats try to make over those with less refined tastes while struggling down the always-rocky road to maturity.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 8, 2002
Is Eminem a movie star? Only when he raps. Playing Jimmy "Rabbit" Smith Jr., a white hip-hopper at odds with everything in his off-kilter trailer-park family and crumbling Detroit environment, he's supposed to ooze bruised sensitivity like a latter-day James Dean. Instead, Eminem holds the screen with hammer-and-tongs determination. He's a galaxy away from the glinting emotionalism of a man born for the camera. Eminem channels his energy into expressing a single feeling at a time as he berates his beautiful mother Stephanie (Kim Basinger)
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By Terry Armour and Terry Armour,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 18, 2003
Brittany Murphy is a self-proclaimed goof ball. "Oh, yeah - I'm a big old goof," she says, giggling as she takes in the sights of the Magnificent Mile from a horse-drawn carriage. "So the fact that someone is paying me to be one kind of blows my mind." Murphy is talking about her latest film, Uptown Girls, which opened nationwide Friday. She plays the spoiled rich daughter of a deceased rock star who, after being swindled out of her inheritance, takes a job as the nanny of a precocious kid (Dakota Fanning)
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By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 2001
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. - While the television blared the news that America had begun its attack on terrorism, Drew Barrymore stood in a hotel hallway, sobbing and hugging Sony Pictures boss John Calley: an older man comforting a scared young woman. Barrymore finally collected herself enough to enter the room. She was here to promote Riding in Cars With Boys, her new movie that opened Friday. But the bombings in Afghanistan left the 26-year-old actress jittery and confused. "I just don't know how to do my job all of a sudden, and that's a very strange feeling," she said, wiping away tears.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 15, 2003
Uptown Girls desperately - a little too desperately - tries to wring laughs from the plight of two emotionally stilted young women. Twentysomething Molly Gunn (Brittany Murphy) is a strange breed of debutante: Her father was a legendary rock singer who died while on tour, and the trust fund he left behind has been enough to allow his daughter to live comfortably as the toast of New York's high-society party scene. Irrepressibly irresponsible, Molly specializes in making a mess of her life, then waiting for someone else to come and clean things up. A crooked accountant and a suddenly depleted trust fund, however, conspire to force Molly into the real world.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 4, 2003
Spun wants to be The Lost Weekend of drug movies, but for movie-lovers it will merely mark a frittered-away afternoon or evening. It follows a speed freak named Ross (Jason Schwartzman) through three rancid Southern California days when he provides wheels for a methamphetamine chef known as, naturally, the Cook (Mickey Rourke) - a bad ol' boy who's the most potent figure in a grotty extended group of crank addicts. The gang includes the Cook's girlfriend, Nikki (Brittany Murphy), her gal pal Cookie (Mena Suvari)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 8, 2002
Is Eminem a movie star? Only when he raps. Playing Jimmy "Rabbit" Smith Jr., a white hip-hopper at odds with everything in his off-kilter trailer-park family and crumbling Detroit environment, he's supposed to ooze bruised sensitivity like a latter-day James Dean. Instead, Eminem holds the screen with hammer-and-tongs determination. He's a galaxy away from the glinting emotionalism of a man born for the camera. Eminem channels his energy into expressing a single feeling at a time as he berates his beautiful mother Stephanie (Kim Basinger)
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By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 2001
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. - While the television blared the news that America had begun its attack on terrorism, Drew Barrymore stood in a hotel hallway, sobbing and hugging Sony Pictures boss John Calley: an older man comforting a scared young woman. Barrymore finally collected herself enough to enter the room. She was here to promote Riding in Cars With Boys, her new movie that opened Friday. But the bombings in Afghanistan left the 26-year-old actress jittery and confused. "I just don't know how to do my job all of a sudden, and that's a very strange feeling," she said, wiping away tears.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 28, 2001
Don't Say A Word packages male hysteria so slickly there isn't an ounce of real life in it. Michael Douglas stars as a high-powered New York psychiatrist who specializes in problem adolescents. On the evening before Thanksgiving he agrees to treat a teen-age patient (Brittany Murphy) in a psychiatric hospital - only to find on Thanksgiving morning that he has to crack her case by 5 p.m. Bad guys have kidnapped his 8-year-old daughter and will kill the precocious tyke if the shrink doesn't retrieve a secret number from Murphy's scrambled brain.
FEATURES
By David Hunter and David Hunter,The Hollywood Reporter | July 19, 1995
A hilarious "clued-in" comedy about cellular-phone-packing Beverly Hills high schoolers, Amy Hecker- ling's "Clueless" sports a terrific cast, sparkling dialogue loaded with slang and a hip soundtrack of pop tunes. OK, it's also plotless and borderline brainless, but that won't stop the Paramount release from cashing in substantially with the teen-age and young adult crowd.Alicia Silverstone ("The Crush") plays rich, spoiled, sweet-natured Cher, our guide into a world where self-assured but likable brats try to make over those with less refined tastes while struggling down the always-rocky road to maturity.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 10, 2003
If you don't like dogs, you won't like Good Boy!, or the things it implies. That includes, first and foremost, the notion that dogs alone make life bearable. Without them, in the world according to this lighthearted little charmer from the Henson studios, people just wouldn't know what to do with themselves. If you're a dog person, of course, this movie will only state the obvious, and you'll probably love it for that very reason (and the simple fact that we never get enough talking-dog movies)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 10, 2003
Tom and Sarah meet cute. They act cute. Gosh darn it, they flat-out are cute. Which is the extent of positive things to be said about Just Married, a mercilessly unappealing romantic comedy about two young people who fall in love, get married, go on the honeymoon from hell and return, each convinced that the other is the root of all evil in the world. Wonderful movies have been made from far flimsier premises. But most of them featured screenwriters who knew how to build a joke, directors who knew how to pace a sequence, characters who managed to be at least occasionally appealing and actors who could play more than one note.
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