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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2013
With "Downton Abbey" about to start Season 3 on these shores this weekend, taking us once more into the rarefied world of British society and grand meals around elegantly appointed tables, your ever-thoughtful Midweek Madness featurette would like to offer this quick refresher on the rules of social etiquette, especially those pertaining to the gentler sex. As you know, the women in "Downton Abbey" sometimes forget their place, which can have devastating...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2013
With "Downton Abbey" about to start Season 3 on these shores this weekend, taking us once more into the rarefied world of British society and grand meals around elegantly appointed tables, your ever-thoughtful Midweek Madness featurette would like to offer this quick refresher on the rules of social etiquette, especially those pertaining to the gentler sex. As you know, the women in "Downton Abbey" sometimes forget their place, which can have devastating...
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
Baffling but true: Not all writers hold editors in high esteem. But the poor dears sometimes have difficulty expressing themselves clearly. To help them out, I have constructed some "your editor" insults, on the model of "yo mama" invective. Contributors are invited to exercise their imaginations through the comments function. Your editor's so dumb, she thinks hapax legomenon is the name of a skin disease.* Your editor's so dumb, he thinks alumnis is a plural.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
Baffling but true: Not all writers hold editors in high esteem. But the poor dears sometimes have difficulty expressing themselves clearly. To help them out, I have constructed some "your editor" insults, on the model of "yo mama" invective. Contributors are invited to exercise their imaginations through the comments function. Your editor's so dumb, she thinks hapax legomenon is the name of a skin disease.* Your editor's so dumb, he thinks alumnis is a plural.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | October 19, 2003
Just coming on the U.S. market is the latest novel by Martin Amis -- his 12th work of fiction -- Yellow Dog (Miramax, 352 pages, $24.95). It is raucously funny, relentlessly fast-paced, delightfully intricate in its internal plays on the best traditions of 18th and 19th century fiction -- and, finally, a deeply moving novel of seriousness and important values. Xan (from Alexander) Meo, a 47-year-old writer, television personality and actor, is married to a woman named Russia. They are adoring parents of 4-year-old Billie and infant Sophie.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2012
It's a story that simply won't go away. It's an upper-class soap opera, and even after the passage of 75 years it still packs a sentimental punch and draws a willing audience into the glittering world of the British aristocracy. It is the saga of England's Edward VIII (he reigned for less than a year and was never crowned), who found it simply impossible to continue with his royal responsibilities without the love of an ambitious commoner from Baltimore, Wallis Warfield Simpson, the Belle of Biddle Street, who was determined to bag a royal and crash her way into the upper strata of British society.
FEATURES
By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN REPORTER | November 17, 2005
By any standard, Mohammed Mamdani qualifies as a visionary. Four years ago, as an 18-year-old high school senior in London, he was so dismayed by what he saw as the alienation of young Muslims in British society - a lack of social opportunities, a scarcity of useful activities, a nearly universal sense of separation - he decided he couldn't live with himself if he didn't do something. He asked his father to install a new phone line into the family home. For the next year, he cut classes, trained himself as a counselor and spent most of his waking hours manning his personal creation, the Muslim Youth Helpline.
FEATURES
By Michele Nevard and Michele Nevard,London Bureau of The Sun | September 13, 1995
London -- Afternoon tea is the meal of the day that draws no class distinction. Nowadays there's no cultural barriers either. In fact, America is home to an increasing number of tea aficionados as tea-drinking shows a rapid rise in popularity similar to the coffee trend that began several years ago.In England it's the national pastime, bringing together cricket players and bus drivers, landed gentry and factory workers. It can be taken in the rarefied atmosphere of London's Ritz Hotel, a country village tearoom filled with lace tablecloths or a takeout sandwich joint.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 29, 1997
LONDON -- Pick a royal, any royal, and Sir Roy Strong is bound to have an opinion.The former head of Britain's National Portrait Gallery and the Victoria & Albert Museum has published his diaries, in effect an insider's guide to London from 1967 to 1987.From receptions at Buckingham Palace to battles in museum boardrooms, Strong is a witty, often wicked tour guide, a man about town in his trademark fedora and velvet frock coat.Here's Strong on Princess Margaret: "tiresome, spoilt, idle and irritating."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 11, 2002
In his spiffy and engrossing Gosford Park, director Robert Altman gathers a group of aristocrats and servants whose lives are made up of trivial pursuits and puts together a game of Cultural Pursuit. He makes it one contest that everyone can learn and win. All you have to do is see and hear. Keep your eyes peeled and your ears open as the guests arrive at the home of Sir William McCordle (Michael Gam- bon) and Lady Sylvia (Kristin Scott Thomas). You'll learn along with the visitors how life is lived at Gosford Park - an estate that cleaves to old-fashioned discipline to avoid confused behavior.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2012
It's a story that simply won't go away. It's an upper-class soap opera, and even after the passage of 75 years it still packs a sentimental punch and draws a willing audience into the glittering world of the British aristocracy. It is the saga of England's Edward VIII (he reigned for less than a year and was never crowned), who found it simply impossible to continue with his royal responsibilities without the love of an ambitious commoner from Baltimore, Wallis Warfield Simpson, the Belle of Biddle Street, who was determined to bag a royal and crash her way into the upper strata of British society.
FEATURES
By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN REPORTER | November 17, 2005
By any standard, Mohammed Mamdani qualifies as a visionary. Four years ago, as an 18-year-old high school senior in London, he was so dismayed by what he saw as the alienation of young Muslims in British society - a lack of social opportunities, a scarcity of useful activities, a nearly universal sense of separation - he decided he couldn't live with himself if he didn't do something. He asked his father to install a new phone line into the family home. For the next year, he cut classes, trained himself as a counselor and spent most of his waking hours manning his personal creation, the Muslim Youth Helpline.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | October 19, 2003
Just coming on the U.S. market is the latest novel by Martin Amis -- his 12th work of fiction -- Yellow Dog (Miramax, 352 pages, $24.95). It is raucously funny, relentlessly fast-paced, delightfully intricate in its internal plays on the best traditions of 18th and 19th century fiction -- and, finally, a deeply moving novel of seriousness and important values. Xan (from Alexander) Meo, a 47-year-old writer, television personality and actor, is married to a woman named Russia. They are adoring parents of 4-year-old Billie and infant Sophie.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 11, 2002
In his spiffy and engrossing Gosford Park, director Robert Altman gathers a group of aristocrats and servants whose lives are made up of trivial pursuits and puts together a game of Cultural Pursuit. He makes it one contest that everyone can learn and win. All you have to do is see and hear. Keep your eyes peeled and your ears open as the guests arrive at the home of Sir William McCordle (Michael Gam- bon) and Lady Sylvia (Kristin Scott Thomas). You'll learn along with the visitors how life is lived at Gosford Park - an estate that cleaves to old-fashioned discipline to avoid confused behavior.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 29, 1997
LONDON -- Pick a royal, any royal, and Sir Roy Strong is bound to have an opinion.The former head of Britain's National Portrait Gallery and the Victoria & Albert Museum has published his diaries, in effect an insider's guide to London from 1967 to 1987.From receptions at Buckingham Palace to battles in museum boardrooms, Strong is a witty, often wicked tour guide, a man about town in his trademark fedora and velvet frock coat.Here's Strong on Princess Margaret: "tiresome, spoilt, idle and irritating."
FEATURES
By Michele Nevard and Michele Nevard,London Bureau of The Sun | September 13, 1995
London -- Afternoon tea is the meal of the day that draws no class distinction. Nowadays there's no cultural barriers either. In fact, America is home to an increasing number of tea aficionados as tea-drinking shows a rapid rise in popularity similar to the coffee trend that began several years ago.In England it's the national pastime, bringing together cricket players and bus drivers, landed gentry and factory workers. It can be taken in the rarefied atmosphere of London's Ritz Hotel, a country village tearoom filled with lace tablecloths or a takeout sandwich joint.
NEWS
March 10, 1996
" Old Money," by Elizabeth Palmer. St. Martin's Press. 280 pages. $21.95Chloe Post falls headlong down a flight of stairs. An accident?, or push?This deftly written and entertaining novel isn't a mystery, although several, including the circumstances of Chloe's death, are revealed. Rather it's a darkly funny social satire, a comedy of family and manners set on the fringes of upper-class British society, where old money meets new.The author has a piercing eye for human foibles and her literate, meticulous style makes this book a delight to read.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan King and Susan King,Los Angeles Times | September 16, 2004
HOLLYWOOD -- Moviegoers familiar with Welsh actor Rhys Ifans from his scene-stealing comedic turn as Hugh Grant's slovenly roommate Spike in 1999's Notting Hill probably won't recognize him in Vanity Fair. Ifans cuts a dashing figure as a noble 19th-century British soldier. Directed by Indian filmmaker Mira Nair (Monsoon Wedding), Vanity Fair is based on William Makepeace Thackeray's 1848 satire of British society. The film stars Reese Witherspoon as the ambitious heroine Becky Sharp, who will stop at nothing to rise to the cream of British society.
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