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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,London Bureau of The Sun | April 27, 1995
LONDON -- In life, Winston Churchill's words stirred a nation. In death, they have caused a small controversy.Yesterday, 1.5 million pages of Churchill's letters, official documents and speeches from childhood to the end of World War II were purchased for $20 million.It took the combined purchasing power of Britain's National Lottery and American billionaire philanthropist John Paul Getty to obtain the papers from the Churchill Archive Settlement, a private family trust.The National Heritage Lottery Fund will pay $18.4 million, while Mr. Getty, a British resident, will contribute $1.6 million.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Picky, Wordville's British honorary consul, recommends consideration of the peroration of A.J.P. Taylor's English History 1914-1945 . "The rhythm is particularly effective, I think," he says. Let's have a look:   In the second World War the British people came of age. This was a people's war. Not only were their needs considered. They themselves wanted to win. Future historians may see the war as a last struggle for the European balance of power or for the maintenance of Empire.
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NEWS
May 13, 2007
Americans by and large cottoned to Tony Blair because he speaks in complete sentences and he's not afraid to make showy displays of his sincerity. He acts as though he knows where he's going, and that moreover he's thought it all through. The British, by contrast, wearied of him, and after 10 years as prime minister he's now putting down the power that he so assiduously put to use. Mr. Blair is an ends-justify-the-means sort of person - which in principle would make him a man to be extremely wary of. But the ends he pursued, particularly in the early going, were so clearly worthwhile that his country afforded him a great deal of latitude.
NEWS
By Matthew Alonsozana | July 24, 2013
Here, across the pond, many of us wonder, "What's the point?" The lead-up to and subsequent coverage of the birth of the new royal heir have cluttered news sites for a great part of the past two weeks. Reporters camped outside the hospital became so starved for news that they began to report about themselves, offering play-by-play accounts of the latest false start. Scampering about the grounds, they jumped at the smallest indication that the royal birth was indeed imminent. Finally, the royal parents-to-be arrived.
NEWS
June 21, 1992
The British monarchy is said to be in trouble because members of the royal family are reported to be unhappily married. Yet one looks at the British political spectrum for the republican party in vain. The Labor Party has always harbored a few politicians who wish to reduce or remove the monarchy in the name of equality, but this is a less active period for such agitation than most.Q. Who says the crown is in peril of being removed? A. The journalists who report that princes and princesses are unhappy.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Picky, Wordville's British honorary consul, recommends consideration of the peroration of A.J.P. Taylor's English History 1914-1945 . "The rhythm is particularly effective, I think," he says. Let's have a look:   In the second World War the British people came of age. This was a people's war. Not only were their needs considered. They themselves wanted to win. Future historians may see the war as a last struggle for the European balance of power or for the maintenance of Empire.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | April 13, 2013
MANCHESTER, England -- There is a story about Margaret Thatcher that is probably apocryphal but speaks volumes about the strength of Britain's first female prime minister, who died Monday at age 87. Following her election in 1979, the story goes that Mrs. Thatcher took her all-male cabinet out to dinner. The waiter asked what she would like. "I'll have the beef," she said. The waiter asked, "What about the vegetables?" "They'll have the same," Mrs. Thatcher replied. "Thatcher Saved Britain," read a headline in the Daily Telegraph.
NEWS
By William Schneider | November 30, 1990
THE 1980s were the decade of conservatism triumphant. It all began with Margaret Thatcher, who became British prime minister in May 1979, more than a year before Ronald Reagan was elected president. Now Thatcher has fallen, betrayed by her own party, after a record 11 1/2 years in office.There is a message here for Republicans in the United States, who are completing their 10th continuous year in office. It has to do with the limits of conservatism. Both the British Conservatives and the American Republicans came to power under the same circumstances -- a popular revolt against inflation, high taxes, big government and national decline.
NEWS
By Matthew Alonsozana | July 24, 2013
Here, across the pond, many of us wonder, "What's the point?" The lead-up to and subsequent coverage of the birth of the new royal heir have cluttered news sites for a great part of the past two weeks. Reporters camped outside the hospital became so starved for news that they began to report about themselves, offering play-by-play accounts of the latest false start. Scampering about the grounds, they jumped at the smallest indication that the royal birth was indeed imminent. Finally, the royal parents-to-be arrived.
FEATURES
By Victor Paul Alvarez and Victor Paul Alvarez,Contributing Writer | September 30, 1994
After just two days in town, the cast and crew of a British television travel program are saying that people in Baltimore are friendly, helpful and proud.The city's Chesapeake Bay, panhandlers (a reminder of London) and penchant for mispronouncing Thames -- for them, it's "tems" -- Street charmed the cast and crew of the "Wish You Were Here?" travel show.After arriving Wednesday night and soaking up a bit of city life around Pratt Street, the crew spent yesterday filming portions of an upcoming program on the Washington, Baltimore and Annapolis area.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | April 13, 2013
MANCHESTER, England -- There is a story about Margaret Thatcher that is probably apocryphal but speaks volumes about the strength of Britain's first female prime minister, who died Monday at age 87. Following her election in 1979, the story goes that Mrs. Thatcher took her all-male cabinet out to dinner. The waiter asked what she would like. "I'll have the beef," she said. The waiter asked, "What about the vegetables?" "They'll have the same," Mrs. Thatcher replied. "Thatcher Saved Britain," read a headline in the Daily Telegraph.
NEWS
May 13, 2007
Americans by and large cottoned to Tony Blair because he speaks in complete sentences and he's not afraid to make showy displays of his sincerity. He acts as though he knows where he's going, and that moreover he's thought it all through. The British, by contrast, wearied of him, and after 10 years as prime minister he's now putting down the power that he so assiduously put to use. Mr. Blair is an ends-justify-the-means sort of person - which in principle would make him a man to be extremely wary of. But the ends he pursued, particularly in the early going, were so clearly worthwhile that his country afforded him a great deal of latitude.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,London Bureau of The Sun | April 27, 1995
LONDON -- In life, Winston Churchill's words stirred a nation. In death, they have caused a small controversy.Yesterday, 1.5 million pages of Churchill's letters, official documents and speeches from childhood to the end of World War II were purchased for $20 million.It took the combined purchasing power of Britain's National Lottery and American billionaire philanthropist John Paul Getty to obtain the papers from the Churchill Archive Settlement, a private family trust.The National Heritage Lottery Fund will pay $18.4 million, while Mr. Getty, a British resident, will contribute $1.6 million.
NEWS
June 21, 1992
The British monarchy is said to be in trouble because members of the royal family are reported to be unhappily married. Yet one looks at the British political spectrum for the republican party in vain. The Labor Party has always harbored a few politicians who wish to reduce or remove the monarchy in the name of equality, but this is a less active period for such agitation than most.Q. Who says the crown is in peril of being removed? A. The journalists who report that princes and princesses are unhappy.
NEWS
By William Schneider | November 30, 1990
THE 1980s were the decade of conservatism triumphant. It all began with Margaret Thatcher, who became British prime minister in May 1979, more than a year before Ronald Reagan was elected president. Now Thatcher has fallen, betrayed by her own party, after a record 11 1/2 years in office.There is a message here for Republicans in the United States, who are completing their 10th continuous year in office. It has to do with the limits of conservatism. Both the British Conservatives and the American Republicans came to power under the same circumstances -- a popular revolt against inflation, high taxes, big government and national decline.
NEWS
July 14, 1996
NOTHING MUCH CHANGED with the long-awaited announcement of a divorce between the Prince and Princess of Wales based on their 3 1/2 -year separation. Prince Charlesremains heir to the throne of his mother, Queen Elizabeth II, and would be the first divorced British king since George I acceded in 1714.Charles' aunt and a brother are divorced; his divorced sister has remarried. The institution of marriage is even weaker in Britain than in the U.S. The myth has grown up that while the middle classes may ignore traditional morality, the royal family may not. In the golden age of monarchy, 'twas the other way round.
NEWS
June 11, 2001
THE UNITED KINGDOM is likely to join the European Monetary Union, replacing the pound with the euro, sooner rather than later, as a result of the Labor government's unprecedented second landslide victory. Prime Minister Tony Blair barely mentioned that in the commendably brief four-week election campaign. But the Conservative Party, led by the bright and youthful William Hague, made instinctive hostility to the euro its chief issue. It bombed. Mr. Blair's centrist, moderate and classless revisionism of Britain's leftist party made history.
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