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July 14, 2011
Westwood vs. Donald Bill Dwyre Los Angeles Times This 140th edition of The Open Championship, also known on the United States side of the pond as the British Open, will come down to a country-wrenching battle for the title between Lee Westwood and Luke Donald. The English will be torn. Their tabloids will wring their hands in indecision that will manifest itself in big, black wobbly headlines. Whom to root for? Which one is truly our lad? They are both Englishmen, of course, but which is more English than the other?
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Sports on TV | July 17, 2014
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By Matt Slovin and The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
Tiger Woods is no stranger to success at the British Open, a tournament he's won three times in his career. He comes into the event having won three tournaments in his past seven, and has much to gain at the Open, including the world's No. 1 ranking, which could be his if he hoists the Claret Jug. The tournament is being held at the Royal Lytham & St. Anne's Golf Club, where it hasn't been hosted since 2001, one year after Woods won the British Open...
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August 8, 2012
Louis Oosthuizen Barry Stavro Los Angeles Times My Ouija board says the PGA champ will emerge from the group of 16 players who have won the last 16 majors and, no, Tiger Woods isn't in that mix. Sunday's winner will be … South Africa's Louis Oosthuizen. Granted, he's one of the more obscure names among the recent 16 major winners. But he's having a fine year. He came within a ball turn of sinking the winning putt at Augusta before Bubba Watson came out of the trees in a playoff to beat him for a green jacket, and Oosthuizen has continued to play well; he was in the mix last week at Firestone.
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By New York Times News Service | July 16, 1992
GULLANE, Scotland -- If Muirfield were a person, it might be the kind of grim British schoolmaster that many of its members -- the prideful and all-male Honorable Company of Edinburgh Golfers -- happen to resemble.Lessons would be delivered with brisk condescension and an undeniable truth: "Place your drives in the fairway, young sirs, or golf for you will be little more than heavy labor."Indeed, missing the short grass at Muirfield, where the 121st British Open begins today, usually forces a player to bend his back in the hayfields that pass for rough or excavate earth from craters that pass for bunkers.
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By Larry Dorman and Larry Dorman,New York Times News Service | July 21, 1995
ST. ANDREWS, Scotland -- From one end of the golf spectrum to the other, the first round of the 124th British Open provided something for everyone yesterday.It ranged from a sublime story line to a frightful spectacle -- from Tom Watson, Ben Crenshaw, John Daly and Mark McNulty all going around the Old Course in 67 strokes to Jack Nicklaus taking a 10 on one hole.There have been wilder rounds in the 124-year history of the Open, but not many. Watson, 45; Crenshaw, 43; McNulty, 41; and Daly, 29, are an unusual quartet of leaders at 5-under par.Three older guys and a good old boy on the Old Course?
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By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2000
ST. ANDREWS, Scotland - He's baaaaack. Like his namesake in those 1980s horror movies, the golf career of Freddie Couples hasn't been killed off yet. A bad back, a bad marriage and a bad attitude brought Couples down from the top of the world rankings, but his immense talent keeps giving him a chance to win another major championship. It happened two years ago at Augusta, where Couples led the Masters with six holes to play. He drove into the trees and, after pitching into the fairway, put his approach on the par-5 13th into Rae's Creek.
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By Ed Sherman and Ed Sherman,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 11, 2004
It's the British Open, part two, this week. This year, the majors, in reality, are the Masters and three British opens. The U.S. Open was played at Shinnecock Hills and the PGA Championship is set for August at Whistling Straits - both links-style courses, reminiscent of the kind of layouts made famous in the "auld country." In the middle is the actual British Open, which will begin Thursday at Royal Troon in Scotland. This is the real deal, as the game makes its annual return to its roots.
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By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2000
ST. ANDREWS, Scotland - Will he or won't he? That was the question fans of Jack Nicklaus here were asking yesterday after watching the 60-year-old legend take a sentimental stroll down the 18th fairway, stop on Swilican Bridge to accept their applause and close out the 129th British Open by missing an 8-foot birdie putt for a round of 1-over-par 73. Nicklaus, who earlier indicated this would be the 37th and last Open of his career, left the door open...
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By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2001
LYTHAM ST. ANNES, England - Mark Wiebe wandered through the clubhouse at Royal Lytham and St. Annes one day this week as if he were in a museum. This was only the second trip to the British Open for the 18-year PGA Tour veteran, and he wanted to soak everything in. The atmosphere. The accents. The history. "It's totally different from any other tournament we play," said Wiebe, whose previous appearance was in 1997 at Royal Troon, where he missed the cut. "The golf courses are all natural.
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By Matt Slovin and The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
Tiger Woods is no stranger to success at the British Open, a tournament he's won three times in his career. He comes into the event having won three tournaments in his past seven, and has much to gain at the Open, including the world's No. 1 ranking, which could be his if he hoists the Claret Jug. The tournament is being held at the Royal Lytham & St. Anne's Golf Club, where it hasn't been hosted since 2001, one year after Woods won the British Open...
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By Jeff Shain, Tribune Newspapers | August 18, 2011
Add Keegan Bradley's name to the PGA Tour roster of rising young American talent. Maybe even at the top. The Vermont native has power, charisma, a Hall of Fame pedigree and some serious moxie after shaking off a triple bogey and five-shot deficit to seize the PGA Championship in his first appearance in a major. The Wanamaker Trophy also gives Bradley a better trophy shelf than those of Dustin Johnson, Nick Watney, Hunter Mahan, Bubba Watson, Matt Kuchar and Rickie Fowler. It's a remarkable list.
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By Jeff Shain, Tribune Newspapers | July 28, 2011
The biggest winner in Northern Ireland's parade of major champions might turn out to be Royal Portrush. The scenic club overlooking the country's northern coast is getting a renewed look to bring back the British Open for the first time in more than 50 years. Meanwhile, there's new discussion about taking the Irish Open north as soon as 2013. Club officials said last week that Northern Ireland finance ministers have pledged the necessary financial support to lure the Irish Open, which has had eight host venues in the last 13 years.
SPORTS
July 14, 2011
Westwood vs. Donald Bill Dwyre Los Angeles Times This 140th edition of The Open Championship, also known on the United States side of the pond as the British Open, will come down to a country-wrenching battle for the title between Lee Westwood and Luke Donald. The English will be torn. Their tabloids will wring their hands in indecision that will manifest itself in big, black wobbly headlines. Whom to root for? Which one is truly our lad? They are both Englishmen, of course, but which is more English than the other?
SPORTS
July 9, 2011
140th British Open When, where: Thursday-Sunday, Royal St. George's Golf Club, Sandwich, England. Course facts: 7,211 yards, par 70. The Open's first venue outside Scotland has hosted the championship 13 times. Format: 72 holes, stroke play. Field cut after 36 holes to top 70 and ties. Four-hole playoff, if necessary, immediately after final round. Field: 156 players (149 pros, 5 amateurs). Openings remain for the highest top-five finisher not yet qualified at both the John Deere Classic and Scottish Open.
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By Jeff Shain, Tribune Newspapers | July 6, 2011
In golf parlance, bodies of water are classified as "hazards. " And, we've come to learn, not only for wayward shots. For Thomas Levet, a French Open victory leap turned into a British Open withdrawal when doctors told him his broken shin requires surgery to insert screws and a plate. "However, the wonderful memory of winning my national Open will definitely keep me going through my recovery," the Frenchman said in giving up his spot next week at Royal St. George's. Call it a consolation prize.
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By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2003
With an impressive victory last weekend in the Western Open, Tiger Woods seemed to quiet most of the whispers about whether the world's best golfer was in a slump. Woods led by as many as 10 strokes and won by five. A winless drought of nearly four months and five tournaments was over. But was the slump? Woods never thought he was in one to begin with, but the indisputable truth heading into this week's British Open is that Woods isn't close to the dominant player he was back when he won seven of 11 majors.
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By Chuck Culpepper and Chuck Culpepper,Tribune Newspapers | July 20, 2009
TURNBERRY, SCOTLAND - That pristine ogre known as golf has struck again, choosing a gorgeous setting by the Irish Sea to unleash its full and singular meanness upon a cherished 59-year-old man. It enticed him for four days of enchantment. It ushered him to the 72nd hole with a one-shot lead in a British Open and a chance to broaden earthly possibility. It brought Tom Watson down that No. 18 fairway to deeply felt applause, and then it threw in a blaring roar when his well-struck 8-iron approach on an 8-foot putt smacked down and bounded onto the green.
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June 9, 2011
While such PGA Tour stalwarts as David Duval , Stuart Appleby and Rocco Mediate drew followers as they went through Monday's U.S. Open qualifying, a former Open champion trudged along in near-anonymity. Steve Jones might have gotten into the Columbus, Ohio, playoff, too, if not for a bout with low blood sugar midway through his second 18 holes. Two bogeys and a double bogey in a four-hole span left him with too much ground to make up. "I felt weird," Jones said.
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