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By Leslie Anne Feagley | March 17, 1991
In traveling through Britain, I've hired cars, tried the BritRail Pass, trekked till my feet ached, rented bikes, ridden the bus and even hitchhiked. But nothing comes close to the exhilaration and rewards, or the economy, of scootering throughout the British Isles.My first scooter adventure began with a skeptical motorcycle salesman. "Let me see if I've got this straight, love," he said, undoubtedly thinking I was joking. "You're an American artist, a woman traveling alone, who wants to buy a scooter so you can bike your way across England, Ireland and Scotland -- and you've never ridden a scooter before."
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By Jeff Shain, Tribune Newspapers | June 24, 2010
It was only a few weeks ago that the LPGA was taking flak for the fact that no U.S.-born player had won a tournament this year. The ensuing weeks have produced an interesting turn of events. The LPGA can point out it has crowned an American winner more recently than its PGA Tour counterparts. While Graeme McDowell introduces himself to the U.S. sports public and pundits ponder the recent shortcomings of Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson, there's an American mini-drought going on among the game's top Y-chromosome pros.
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By Karin Esterhammer and Karin Esterhammer,Special to the Sun | December 8, 2002
At the airport in Birming-ham, England, the officer looked at our German and U.S. passports and asked what our destination was. "Isle of Man," I answered. "Oh, do you have family there?" she asked. "No, we're just going for vacation," my husband, Rolf, said. "That's rather odd, isn't it?" We must have looked confused, because she added: "Well, foreigners just never go there unless they have family." It seems she was right. Only two U.S. addresses had been entered in the guest book at our B&B since 1989--- and both belonged to Rolf.
NEWS
July 8, 2007
Common Ground on the Hill will hold a Roots Music & Arts Festival from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. today at the Carroll County Farm Museum, 500 S. Center St., Westminster. Headliners include Appalachian balladeer Jean Ritchie at 3 p.m. and Grammy Award winner Tom Chapin at 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. Music, arts and crafts, storytelling, performing arts, children's activities, ethnic foods and a Family World Village are featured. Tickets are: $20 for adults; $10 for teens 13-18; $5 for ages 6-12 with an adult; free for 5 and under with an adult.
NEWS
May 1, 1998
Milburn Henke,79, the first U.S combat soldier to set foot on the British Isles during World War II, died in Hutchinson, Minn., on Sunday.Pub Date: 5/01/98
NEWS
December 10, 1999
Kenny Baker, 78, a jazz musician who performed for sellout British audiences in the 1950s, died Tuesday in a hospital in Felpham in southern England, his manager Jim Simpson said. He had been hospitalized for three weeks with a viral infection.He is best known for his work with the jazz band Baker's Dozen and for his numerous performances on film and television soundtracks. A session musician, he performed with many stars, including Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr. and Tony Bennett. His work can also be heard on James Bond movie soundtracks.
NEWS
July 8, 2007
Common Ground on the Hill will hold a Roots Music & Arts Festival from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. today at the Carroll County Farm Museum, 500 S. Center St., Westminster. Headliners include Appalachian balladeer Jean Ritchie at 3 p.m. and Grammy Award winner Tom Chapin at 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. Music, arts and crafts, storytelling, performing arts, children's activities, ethnic foods and a Family World Village are featured. Tickets are: $20 for adults; $10 for teens 13-18; $5 for ages 6-12 with an adult; free for 5 and under with an adult.
NEWS
June 1, 2000
RESTORATION of home rule for Northern Ireland brings back the provincial government that lasted a half-century until 1971. With this difference: Instead of a government vs. opposition -- as in all other regimes in the British Isles -- the parties share executive power in rough proportion to their electoral strength. This completes the grand "devolution" that is Tony Blair's British Labor government's chief achievement. Four such regimes, analogous to American states, exist in stages from embryo to infancy.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 6, 1995
Guaranteed literal dialogue from "An Awfully Big Adventure":"Eh? Hos gwinne dwan, mite?""Euwww, noffinx. Me dwags dwan't gribe, effo."That's because the movie is in real English -- the English of the British Isles -- rather than in that fictitious, bell-clear movie language known as Middle-Atlantic, constructed to be intelligible the colonies.Thus "An Awfully Big Adventure" seems to play as if through a fog, about a third of it knowable, the rest merely to be taken on faith. It may be too much.
NEWS
By Jeff Shain, Tribune Newspapers | June 24, 2010
It was only a few weeks ago that the LPGA was taking flak for the fact that no U.S.-born player had won a tournament this year. The ensuing weeks have produced an interesting turn of events. The LPGA can point out it has crowned an American winner more recently than its PGA Tour counterparts. While Graeme McDowell introduces himself to the U.S. sports public and pundits ponder the recent shortcomings of Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson, there's an American mini-drought going on among the game's top Y-chromosome pros.
TRAVEL
By Beverly Beyette and Beverly Beyette,Los Angeles Times | August 21, 2005
Haste ye back," beckoned a sign at the car ferry terminal at Ardrossan on Scotland's western coast as the boat eased up to the dock after crossing from the Isle of Arran. It was July and I'd been distillery-hopping on Scottish islands. After two days on Arran, the largest of the Firth of Clyde islands, I had followed the whiskey trail to Islay and Jura in the southern Inner Hebrides. I'd chosen to return to Arran to further explore its heather-blanketed glens, peaceful harbors and picturesque villages.
TRAVEL
By Jane Wooldridge and Jane Wooldridge,Knight Ridder / Tribune | October 10, 2004
The prescription: a healthy bout of retail therapy in Glasgow, Scotland, a city ranked as Britain's lustiest shopping mecca outside London. It would be a weekend rage of clothes, cocktails and caloric indulgence. And then the dollar tanked, committing hari-kari at the brink of 2 to the pound (up from its usual wildly expensive rate of $1.60). Shopping -- or buying, at least -- was out. What remained was four crisp days to discover the where and why of the once-gritty city now dubbed City of Culture, City of Architecture and Design, Scotland's Capital of Cool.
TRAVEL
By Karin Esterhammer and Karin Esterhammer,Special to the Sun | December 8, 2002
At the airport in Birming-ham, England, the officer looked at our German and U.S. passports and asked what our destination was. "Isle of Man," I answered. "Oh, do you have family there?" she asked. "No, we're just going for vacation," my husband, Rolf, said. "That's rather odd, isn't it?" We must have looked confused, because she added: "Well, foreigners just never go there unless they have family." It seems she was right. Only two U.S. addresses had been entered in the guest book at our B&B since 1989--- and both belonged to Rolf.
NEWS
June 1, 2000
RESTORATION of home rule for Northern Ireland brings back the provincial government that lasted a half-century until 1971. With this difference: Instead of a government vs. opposition -- as in all other regimes in the British Isles -- the parties share executive power in rough proportion to their electoral strength. This completes the grand "devolution" that is Tony Blair's British Labor government's chief achievement. Four such regimes, analogous to American states, exist in stages from embryo to infancy.
NEWS
December 10, 1999
Kenny Baker, 78, a jazz musician who performed for sellout British audiences in the 1950s, died Tuesday in a hospital in Felpham in southern England, his manager Jim Simpson said. He had been hospitalized for three weeks with a viral infection.He is best known for his work with the jazz band Baker's Dozen and for his numerous performances on film and television soundtracks. A session musician, he performed with many stars, including Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr. and Tony Bennett. His work can also be heard on James Bond movie soundtracks.
NEWS
By Russell Working and Russell Working,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 22, 1999
VLADIVOSTOK, Russia -- "Oh, they're going around the world, too, are they?" says Peter Crichton when he hears about the Germans. "I saw their Citroen out in the car park."Round-the-world adventurers were practically tripping over each other the other day in this remote finger of Russia.Peter and Eileen Crichton, a middle-aged British couple, had driven across Eurasia from Saudi Arabia in a Land Rover Discovery.The two Germans had crossed Russia in a 1963 Citroen 2 CV, a car so ugly and undersized that it makes the old Volkswagen Bug look stylish and roomy.
NEWS
By Ann Egerton | April 22, 1991
THE PENGUIN BOOK OF BRITISH COMIC STORIES. Patricia Craig, editor. Viking. 514 pages. $24.95.MOST OF the giants of late 19th century and 20 century British literature are represented in this anthology of humorous stories. Kipling, Saki, Maugham, Dylan Thomas, Beckett, Waugh, Graham Greene, Muriel Spark -- they're all here. Arguably, of the luminaries of the period, only Aldous Huxley, James Joyce and Virginia Woolf are missing. A number of less familiar names, such as Richmal Compton, William Sansom, H.E. Bates and Michael Frayn, are also included in this collection of 42 stories by as many writers.
FEATURES
By Robert W. Butler and Robert W. Butler,Kansas City Star | July 17, 1993
He's slight and wan and has a shapeless, doughy face like a pre-adolescent boy.She has a horsy mouth, a perpetually wrinkled brow, and it's hard to decide what's sharper -- her nose or her jaw line.But put Kenneth Branagh and Emma Thompson in a movie, give TTC them characters and a story to tell, and watch the sparks fly.Catch their current act in the Branagh-directed "Much Ado About Nothing," in which the married couple play Shakespeare's sharp-witted battling lovers, Beatrice and Benedick, and you'll see the most intoxicating kind of movie magic.
NEWS
May 1, 1998
Milburn Henke,79, the first U.S combat soldier to set foot on the British Isles during World War II, died in Hutchinson, Minn., on Sunday.Pub Date: 5/01/98
NEWS
October 12, 1997
Schools must do more to close computer gapIn response to your editorial on the computer education gap (Sept. 29), the program that the county has to help teachers finance their purchase of computers is certainly a step in the right direction, but it will hardly plug the gap we have in technology education.To start filling this gap, the state and all the counties need to decide if computer education is going to be part of the curriculum and if it then is the duty of the different boards of education to fund all schools equally.
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