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By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2003
A British intelligence employee is under criminal investigation in connection with the leak of a National Security Agency memorandum calling for stepped-up eavesdropping on countries whose United Nations Security Council votes on Iraq could be crucial, police reported. The investigation of a 28-year-old female employee of Government Communications Headquarters, known as GCHQ, appears to confirm the authenticity of the NSA memo printed last week in The Observer, a British newspaper. An NSA spokesman declined to comment yesterday.
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NEWS
By Ray McGovern | July 30, 2012
Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney's strong pro-Israel statements over the weekend, including his endorsement of Jerusalem as Israel's capital (a reversal of long-standing U.S. policy), increases the pressure on President Barack Obama to prove that he is an equally strong backer of Israel. The key question is whether Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Defense Minister Ehud Barak will interpret the presidential campaign rhetoric as an open invitation to provoke hostilities with Iran, in the expectation that President Obama will feel forced to jump in with both feet in support of our "ally" Israel.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 22, 2008
LONDON - A British court said Monday that a terror suspect being held at Guantanamo Bay had a credible argument that the United States had illegally spirited him away to Morocco and that he was tortured there. The United States has repeatedly rejected allegations by the suspect, Binyam Mohamed, that he had been sent away and tortured, most recently in a letter to the British government last month. But the British court described the American conclusion as "untenable." It did not discuss the evidence it had seen, but said there was "no good reason" the American government had refused to turn over materials to Mohamed's lawyers that might help him prove his allegations before an American military tribunal.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 22, 2008
LONDON - A British court said Monday that a terror suspect being held at Guantanamo Bay had a credible argument that the United States had illegally spirited him away to Morocco and that he was tortured there. The United States has repeatedly rejected allegations by the suspect, Binyam Mohamed, that he had been sent away and tortured, most recently in a letter to the British government last month. But the British court described the American conclusion as "untenable." It did not discuss the evidence it had seen, but said there was "no good reason" the American government had refused to turn over materials to Mohamed's lawyers that might help him prove his allegations before an American military tribunal.
NEWS
By Sarah Weinman and Sarah Weinman,Special to The Sun | May 4, 2008
Buckingham Palace Gardens By Anne Perry The Darkroom of Damocles By Willem Frederik Hermans Overlook / 391 pages / $28 Willem Frederik Hermans was renowned as one of the greatest 20th-century Dutch novelists, but until recently his work was scarcely available in America. Now a new translation of this 1958 novel has landed, and a half-century has not dulled the startling, Camus-like feel of what starts out as a simple tale of following orders during wartime Holland. Henri Osewoudt, a young tobacconist, starts receiving phone calls and missives from a mysterious man calling himself Dorbeck and claiming to be affiliated with British intelligence.
NEWS
By Myron Beckenstein | October 27, 1991
VISIONS OF INFAMY.William H. Honan.St. Martin's.346 pages. $22.95.THE GREAT PACIFIC WAR.Hector C. Bywater.St. Martin's.321 pages. $22.95.7/8 William Honan believes that the Japanese were entranced by Hector Bywater's 1925 book, "The Great Pacific War" -- so entranced that his book about it, "Visions of Infamy," is subtitled "The Untold Story of How Journalist Hector C. Bywater Devised the Plans that Led to Pearl Harbor." Well, maybe not quite Pearl Harbor, but close enough, he feels.Bywater was a naval scholar and journalist in an age in which the general public seems to have paid naval affairs much more attention than we do today.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | June 1, 2007
MOSCOW -- The Russian businessman accused by British prosecutors of fatally poisoning former Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko in London turned the tables yesterday and blamed the death on British secret services -- and a fierce opponent of the Kremlin who lives in self-imposed exile in Britain. Andrei Lugovoi, a former bodyguard with the KGB, also alleged that Litvinenko had been recruited as a spy for Britain's Secret Intelligence Service and that Litvinenko had tried in turn to recruit him to gather "compromising material" on Russian President Vladimir V. Putin.
NEWS
By DAVID HOLLEY and DAVID HOLLEY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 24, 2006
MOSCOW -- In an incident reminiscent of a Cold War-era James Bond movie, Russian officials accused four British diplomats of spying, saying yesterday that the alleged agents used short-range communications equipment hidden in fake rocks to exchange information with Russian sources. The Federal Security Service, or FSB, the main successor to the Soviet-era KGB, alleged that one of the diplomats, Second Secretary Marc Doe of the British Embassy's political section, also channeled money from his government to Russian human rights groups.
NEWS
By Ray McGovern | July 30, 2012
Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney's strong pro-Israel statements over the weekend, including his endorsement of Jerusalem as Israel's capital (a reversal of long-standing U.S. policy), increases the pressure on President Barack Obama to prove that he is an equally strong backer of Israel. The key question is whether Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Defense Minister Ehud Barak will interpret the presidential campaign rhetoric as an open invitation to provoke hostilities with Iran, in the expectation that President Obama will feel forced to jump in with both feet in support of our "ally" Israel.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | February 14, 2007
PHILADELPHIA -- Too bad the trial of Vice President Dick Cheney's former top aide, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, is getting only a fraction of the media fuss stirred up by the death of Anna Nicole Smith. Mr. Libby's perjury trial is crucial to U.S. security. It has laid bare how the White House skewed the intelligence on Iraq's weapons of mass destruction and sold these distortions to the media. What makes the tale even more unnerving is the possibility that the process is being repeated with Iran.
NEWS
By Sarah Weinman and Sarah Weinman,Special to The Sun | May 4, 2008
Buckingham Palace Gardens By Anne Perry The Darkroom of Damocles By Willem Frederik Hermans Overlook / 391 pages / $28 Willem Frederik Hermans was renowned as one of the greatest 20th-century Dutch novelists, but until recently his work was scarcely available in America. Now a new translation of this 1958 novel has landed, and a half-century has not dulled the startling, Camus-like feel of what starts out as a simple tale of following orders during wartime Holland. Henri Osewoudt, a young tobacconist, starts receiving phone calls and missives from a mysterious man calling himself Dorbeck and claiming to be affiliated with British intelligence.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | June 1, 2007
MOSCOW -- The Russian businessman accused by British prosecutors of fatally poisoning former Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko in London turned the tables yesterday and blamed the death on British secret services -- and a fierce opponent of the Kremlin who lives in self-imposed exile in Britain. Andrei Lugovoi, a former bodyguard with the KGB, also alleged that Litvinenko had been recruited as a spy for Britain's Secret Intelligence Service and that Litvinenko had tried in turn to recruit him to gather "compromising material" on Russian President Vladimir V. Putin.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | February 14, 2007
PHILADELPHIA -- Too bad the trial of Vice President Dick Cheney's former top aide, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, is getting only a fraction of the media fuss stirred up by the death of Anna Nicole Smith. Mr. Libby's perjury trial is crucial to U.S. security. It has laid bare how the White House skewed the intelligence on Iraq's weapons of mass destruction and sold these distortions to the media. What makes the tale even more unnerving is the possibility that the process is being repeated with Iran.
NEWS
By WHITNEY KASSEL | January 30, 2006
KIEV, UKRAINE -- That four British diplomats allegedly were passing information from the British embassy in Moscow to MI6 headquarters in London is unrelated to the financial aid that their country gives to Russian non-governmental organizations. President Vladimir I. Putin is manipulating the recent revelation and galvanizing latent xenophobia in Russia to garner support against foreign technical assistance and aid, both of which he perceives as a threat to his power. It appears that the diplomats were using a device planted in a fake rock in a Moscow park to transmit the information.
NEWS
By DAVID HOLLEY and DAVID HOLLEY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 24, 2006
MOSCOW -- In an incident reminiscent of a Cold War-era James Bond movie, Russian officials accused four British diplomats of spying, saying yesterday that the alleged agents used short-range communications equipment hidden in fake rocks to exchange information with Russian sources. The Federal Security Service, or FSB, the main successor to the Soviet-era KGB, alleged that one of the diplomats, Second Secretary Marc Doe of the British Embassy's political section, also channeled money from his government to Russian human rights groups.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Scott Shane and Todd Richissin and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2004
LONDON - British intelligence agents were involved in intercepting conversations of U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan in the weeks before the Iraq war, according to a former Cabinet member in Prime Minister Tony Blair's administration who said she read the transcripts. The highly unusual revelation by Clare Short, former international development secretary, made public what has long been an unspoken assumption among foreign diplomats in the United States: Their phone calls and office conversations are routinely intercepted by the National Security Agency and its British equivalent, the Government Communications Headquarters, which work closely together.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | July 21, 1994
What are spies for? They recruit one another to betray their respective services, but what positive things do they accomplish?The CIA acknowledged recently that it has little current information on Africa because the actual mission of its agents in Africa had always been merely to recruit double agents in Soviet and East-bloc embassies.During its nearly five decades of existence, the CIA has been responsible for certain operations that did the reputation of the United States no good, such as the Bay of Pigs landing and the Phoenix program in Vietnam.
NEWS
By WHITNEY KASSEL | January 30, 2006
KIEV, UKRAINE -- That four British diplomats allegedly were passing information from the British embassy in Moscow to MI6 headquarters in London is unrelated to the financial aid that their country gives to Russian non-governmental organizations. President Vladimir I. Putin is manipulating the recent revelation and galvanizing latent xenophobia in Russia to garner support against foreign technical assistance and aid, both of which he perceives as a threat to his power. It appears that the diplomats were using a device planted in a fake rock in a Moscow park to transmit the information.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2003
A British intelligence employee is under criminal investigation in connection with the leak of a National Security Agency memorandum calling for stepped-up eavesdropping on countries whose United Nations Security Council votes on Iraq could be crucial, police reported. The investigation of a 28-year-old female employee of Government Communications Headquarters, known as GCHQ, appears to confirm the authenticity of the NSA memo printed last week in The Observer, a British newspaper. An NSA spokesman declined to comment yesterday.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 18, 2002
JERUSALEM -- Abba Eban, an eloquent statesman whose passionate oratory helped persuade the United Nations to approve the creation of the Jewish state 54 years ago, died yesterday at a hospital outside Tel Aviv. He was 87. The veteran diplomat made a career defending Israel in times of war and trouble, captivating audiences with his polished British accent and ability to converse fluently in 10 languages. He backed his rhetorical skills with a pragmatic willingness to compromise, giving Israel an authoritative and sophisticated voice as the state he helped found in 1948 struggled through the first three decades of its turbulent history.
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