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February 10, 2005
A SERIES OF terrorist attacks in 1974 led the British government to launch a crackdown employing police powers that were unseemly by what were then American standards of due process - but that pale next to the system the United States is constructing today. The Patriot Act, the incarceration without charge of such citizens as Jose Padilla and Yaser Hamdi, the secret roundups of illegal aliens - these make the British tactics look almost quaint by comparison. Nonetheless, 11 innocent people spent years in British prisons as a result of that earlier campaign against terror.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 22, 2008
LONDON - A British court said Monday that a terror suspect being held at Guantanamo Bay had a credible argument that the United States had illegally spirited him away to Morocco and that he was tortured there. The United States has repeatedly rejected allegations by the suspect, Binyam Mohamed, that he had been sent away and tortured, most recently in a letter to the British government last month. But the British court described the American conclusion as "untenable." It did not discuss the evidence it had seen, but said there was "no good reason" the American government had refused to turn over materials to Mohamed's lawyers that might help him prove his allegations before an American military tribunal.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 22, 2008
LONDON - A British court said Monday that a terror suspect being held at Guantanamo Bay had a credible argument that the United States had illegally spirited him away to Morocco and that he was tortured there. The United States has repeatedly rejected allegations by the suspect, Binyam Mohamed, that he had been sent away and tortured, most recently in a letter to the British government last month. But the British court described the American conclusion as "untenable." It did not discuss the evidence it had seen, but said there was "no good reason" the American government had refused to turn over materials to Mohamed's lawyers that might help him prove his allegations before an American military tribunal.
NEWS
April 9, 2007
If lasciviously evaluating the British sailors and marines newly freed from Iran is wrong, America doesn't want to be right! Pip-Pip, Cheerio, these 14 blokes and one bird are HOT. My colleagues and I are rating the hostages on a scale of 1 to 4 handheld GPS units showing they were never in Iranian waters in the first place! Ahoy, mateys! - Colleen Werthmann on Huffingtonpost.com It's hard to say what was more troubling about the latest ordeal - Iran's immoral and illegal seizure of 15 British sailors or the fond farewells the ex-hostages bid their captors.
NEWS
By Ron DePasquale and Ron DePasquale,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 3, 2005
BELFAST, Northern Ireland - British plans for halving the number of its troops in Northern Ireland threaten the safety of Protestants and could delay progress in the province's stalled peace process, Protestant unionist leaders said yesterday. In response to the Irish Republican Army's pledge last week to end its armed struggle, the British army said it would reduce its strength to the lowest point since Northern Ireland's "Troubles" erupted in 1969. Hard-line Democratic Unionists said yesterday that that it could take two years for the peace process to lead to power sharing with Sinn Fein, the IRA's political ally.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 3, 2002
LONDON -- Feel free to repeat what you will about President Bush's intelligence, make up your own jokes about his odds of spelling Mensa, much less testing his way into it, see how many variations you can come up with of "he's one sandwich short of a picnic" or "he's one banana short of a bunch." Just don't try to do it in a British television commercial. The British government has banned a promotional spot that shows a cartoon Bush trying to play a video by placing it in a bread toaster.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 17, 2004
LONDON - Britain's highest court ruled yesterday that the British government cannot indefinitely detain foreigners suspected of terrorism without charging or trying them. It called the process a violation of European human rights laws. A specially convened panel of judges in the Law Lords ruled 8-1 in favor of nine foreign, Muslim men who have been in detention, most of them in Belmarsh Prison in London, for as long as three years. The prison has been called "Britain's Guantanamo" by human rights groups.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2001
As the United States moves its military toward a possible war with Afghanistan, bombers are gathering on a lush island south of India that has a dark history. Diego Garcia, a U-shaped island 37 miles long that was once a British coconut plantation, was secretly emptied of its native population by the British from 1966 to 1971 so the United States could build a military base there. The British government, which owns the island, transplanted thousands of natives more than 1,200 miles, dumping them in the slums of Mauritius, an island east of Africa.
NEWS
March 13, 1992
Envy the British. They were informed on March 11 of a national election. Late on April 9, they will hear the returns come in. Where Americans endure an endless campaign, the British will get it all done in 29 days. The transition in power, if mandated, will take place the next afternoon.But duration aside, the prognosis for this election is bleak. A hung Parliament, perhaps. The same plague-on-both-houses that American anti-incumbent sentiment displays.British people are tired of the Conservative government after 13 unbroken years, and a worse recession than ours.
NEWS
April 9, 2007
If lasciviously evaluating the British sailors and marines newly freed from Iran is wrong, America doesn't want to be right! Pip-Pip, Cheerio, these 14 blokes and one bird are HOT. My colleagues and I are rating the hostages on a scale of 1 to 4 handheld GPS units showing they were never in Iranian waters in the first place! Ahoy, mateys! - Colleen Werthmann on Huffingtonpost.com It's hard to say what was more troubling about the latest ordeal - Iran's immoral and illegal seizure of 15 British sailors or the fond farewells the ex-hostages bid their captors.
NEWS
By Ron DePasquale and Ron DePasquale,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 3, 2005
BELFAST, Northern Ireland - British plans for halving the number of its troops in Northern Ireland threaten the safety of Protestants and could delay progress in the province's stalled peace process, Protestant unionist leaders said yesterday. In response to the Irish Republican Army's pledge last week to end its armed struggle, the British army said it would reduce its strength to the lowest point since Northern Ireland's "Troubles" erupted in 1969. Hard-line Democratic Unionists said yesterday that that it could take two years for the peace process to lead to power sharing with Sinn Fein, the IRA's political ally.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 2, 2005
MARTIN O'Malley expected to be asked about this one day - whether his recent collegial encounters with the British government (a trip to London for a speech in October 2003, and again last week for a consultation with municipal officials) conflict with his deep-seated belief in the end of British control and the creation of a unified Ireland. In statement and in song over the years, as a brash Baltimore city councilman condemning the appearance of a royal regiment at the Baltimore Arena 12 years ago and as lead singer in his Celtic rock band singing "Give Ireland Back to the Irish," O'Malley has cried out for freedom for Northern Ireland and recalled the long history of British occupation.
NEWS
February 10, 2005
A SERIES OF terrorist attacks in 1974 led the British government to launch a crackdown employing police powers that were unseemly by what were then American standards of due process - but that pale next to the system the United States is constructing today. The Patriot Act, the incarceration without charge of such citizens as Jose Padilla and Yaser Hamdi, the secret roundups of illegal aliens - these make the British tactics look almost quaint by comparison. Nonetheless, 11 innocent people spent years in British prisons as a result of that earlier campaign against terror.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 17, 2004
LONDON - Britain's highest court ruled yesterday that the British government cannot indefinitely detain foreigners suspected of terrorism without charging or trying them. It called the process a violation of European human rights laws. A specially convened panel of judges in the Law Lords ruled 8-1 in favor of nine foreign, Muslim men who have been in detention, most of them in Belmarsh Prison in London, for as long as three years. The prison has been called "Britain's Guantanamo" by human rights groups.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 17, 2004
LONDON - Prime Minister Tony Blair's government has taken a hard look at England and delivered its assessment yesterday: It's an island of too many inhabitants who are fat, clumsy, promiscuous, drug-abusing, chain-smoking, pub-crawling drunks who are sleeping, binge drinking and puffing their way to sterility, liver disease and lung cancer. This from a prime minister who is seeking re-election. But enough is enough, the government announced yesterday. Led by Blair, the ruling Labor Party has blown the whistle and told the slackers of the country to shape up. And, in some ways, England will have no choice.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 16, 2003
LONDON - The ways the U.S. and British governments have handled news surrounding the capture of Saddam Hussein could hardly be more different, and with good reason: While the accomplishment has given an instant and significant boost to President Bush, Prime Minister Tony Blair's political fortunes continue to be hampered by the situation in Iraq. Hussein's humiliation has been nearly the only topic on Britain's 24-hour news channels since the story broke, and yesterday most newspapers devoted their entire front page to his capture.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 19, 2003
LONDON - The arms expert at the center of a dispute about whether the British government doctored its intelligence reports on Iraq's weapons programs to gain public support for going to war was found dead on yesterday morning near his home in Oxfordshire, his wife said. The weapons specialist, Dr. David Kelly, left his home on Thursday afternoon saying he was going for a walk, and never returned, his wife, Janice Kelly, said in a telephone interview on yesterday. Janice Kelly said yesterday that the police had confirmed that the body was her husband's and that the cause of death was suicide.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 2, 2005
MARTIN O'Malley expected to be asked about this one day - whether his recent collegial encounters with the British government (a trip to London for a speech in October 2003, and again last week for a consultation with municipal officials) conflict with his deep-seated belief in the end of British control and the creation of a unified Ireland. In statement and in song over the years, as a brash Baltimore city councilman condemning the appearance of a royal regiment at the Baltimore Arena 12 years ago and as lead singer in his Celtic rock band singing "Give Ireland Back to the Irish," O'Malley has cried out for freedom for Northern Ireland and recalled the long history of British occupation.
NEWS
November 19, 2003
Britons are full of opinions about the United States and its president as George Bush begins his state visit. Newspaper editorials thunder for and against him, making the British newspapers even livelier than usual. Here is a sampling of what people are saying, as seen through letters to the editor and an editorial: Letters to George Bush in The Guardian Dear George, Please, please, please don't kick the Queen out of Buckingham Palace so you can give it to Halliburton to rebuild. William Dampier Dear George, Welcome to Britain.
NEWS
July 19, 2003
Bush vouched for the veracity of British claim Neither the writer of the editorial "Urgent and wrong" (July 15) nor Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld is right that the president's statement in the State of the Union address that "the British government has learned that Saddam Hussein recently sought significant quantities of uranium from Africa" was even "technically correct." The president did not say "the British government believes" or "the British government has told us." He said "the British government has learned."
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