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By William Pfaff | November 4, 1996
LONDON -- The British Empire came to an end just 40 years ago, its death agony lasting from the 31st of October to the 6th of November, 1956. The proximate cause of death is known. The real cause remains a mystery.The proximate cause is called by historians ''Suez.'' The agents of the empire's execution were Gamal Abdel Nasser and Anthony Eden. Colonel Nasser was considered by Eden, then Britain's prime minister, as ''a new Hitler.'' He was the first of the Western-designated ''new Hitlers'' to appear in the Middle East.
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NEWS
By From Sun news services | July 11, 2009
Michael Jackson's drug history to be probed Detectives investigating the death of Michael Jackson are looking at his prescription drug history and trying to talk with his numerous former doctors, the Los Angeles police chief said. Jackson's father, Joe Jackson, told ABC News in an interview that he believed "foul play" was involved in his son's death. But in the interview aired Friday on Good Morning America, Jackson did not elaborate. Los Angeles Police Chief William Bratton told CNN that police are waiting for the coroner's report before ruling out any possibilities in their "comprehensive" investigation into the sudden death of the 50-year-old pop star two weeks ago. The coroner's report will determine the cause of death and hinges on time-consuming toxicology tests.
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NEWS
February 21, 2007
?The unique thing about it is, it provides real-time, 3-D, actionable intelligence.? Don Ryan, Proxy Aviation Systems CEO, on a new drone aircraft tested by the Germantown company Article, PG 1d Up Next Tomorrow Southern Sounds Southern and proud, Florida-born JJ Grey talks about his Alligator Records debut, Country Ghetto. His sound, mixing country, funk and blues, can be heard Feb. 28 at the Recher Theatre. in Live! Friday Abolition Amazing Grace, Michael Apted's drama about the drive to end slavery in the British Empire, opens.
NEWS
January 31, 2009
JOHN MARTYN, 60 British singer and songwriter British singer-songwriter John Martyn, whose soulful songs were covered by the likes of Eric Clapton, died Thursday in Ireland. Mr. Martyn's official Web site announced the musician's death, but it did not give a cause of death. A skilled guitarist and earthy vocalist influenced by folk, blues and jazz, Mr. Martyn performed with - and was admired by - musicians including Mr. Clapton, Pink Floyd's David Gilmour and Phil Collins. He took up the guitar in his teens, moved to London and released a series of enduring albums, including The Road to Ruin and Solid Air, regarded by some critics as one of the best British albums of the 1970s.
NEWS
September 13, 1992
Col. Frederick Stansbury Haydon, an author and a member of the Order of the British Empire, died in his sleep at the Meridan Nursing Center in Randallstown on Thursday.A military funeral for the 85-year-old Great Neck, N.Y., native will be held at 1:30 p.m. tomorrow at the Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery, 11501 Garrison Forest Road, Owings Mills.Reared in Towson, Colonel Haydon was a graduate of the Boys' Latin School and the Johns Hopkins University, where he completed his undergraduate work in three years.
NEWS
January 31, 2009
JOHN MARTYN, 60 British singer and songwriter British singer-songwriter John Martyn, whose soulful songs were covered by the likes of Eric Clapton, died Thursday in Ireland. Mr. Martyn's official Web site announced the musician's death, but it did not give a cause of death. A skilled guitarist and earthy vocalist influenced by folk, blues and jazz, Mr. Martyn performed with - and was admired by - musicians including Mr. Clapton, Pink Floyd's David Gilmour and Phil Collins. He took up the guitar in his teens, moved to London and released a series of enduring albums, including The Road to Ruin and Solid Air, regarded by some critics as one of the best British albums of the 1970s.
NEWS
February 15, 2002
THE MAN who led New York through its darkest hours now becomes a knight of the British Empire. Taking the Mother Country by storm this week, Rudolph Giuliani, "lately mayor of New York," got his new title Wednesday from Queen Elizabeth II. The ceremony provided another glimpse of a politician's metamorphosis, proof again that in politics a few hours can be a lifetime. Thought of before the attack as a somewhat edgy and authoritarian leader, Mr. Giuliani became the resilient and empathetic symbol of a city and nation that refused to buckle after the twin towers attack.
NEWS
December 10, 1999
Kenny Baker, 78, a jazz musician who performed for sellout British audiences in the 1950s, died Tuesday in a hospital in Felpham in southern England, his manager Jim Simpson said. He had been hospitalized for three weeks with a viral infection.He is best known for his work with the jazz band Baker's Dozen and for his numerous performances on film and television soundtracks. A session musician, he performed with many stars, including Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr. and Tony Bennett. His work can also be heard on James Bond movie soundtracks.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau of The Sun | January 7, 1992
LONDON -- As it nearly always does, the queen of England's honors list this year provoked some controversy and displeasure.One writer to the Daily Telegraph complained of "dishing out honors" to ex-hostages, rugby players, television personalities and others "just because they have been creditably in the news."Knights bachelors were made, as were barons and baronets. There were investitures in the Order of the Bath, and archaic titles bestowed, such as Commander of the British Empire and the lowlier Order of the British Empire.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | March 5, 1993
LONDON -- For the past 70 years a British firefighter who rescued a child from a burning building might get a spot on the queen's honors list, and an award grandiosely called a British Empire Medal (BEM).A soldier of the ranks who saved his comrades by charging an enemy machine-gun nest might be nominated for the Military Medal.But neither hero could aspire to much higher. These were the awards reserved for the working classes and enlisted ranks.Grander honors, such as the MBE (Member of the British Empire)
NEWS
February 21, 2007
?The unique thing about it is, it provides real-time, 3-D, actionable intelligence.? Don Ryan, Proxy Aviation Systems CEO, on a new drone aircraft tested by the Germantown company Article, PG 1d Up Next Tomorrow Southern Sounds Southern and proud, Florida-born JJ Grey talks about his Alligator Records debut, Country Ghetto. His sound, mixing country, funk and blues, can be heard Feb. 28 at the Recher Theatre. in Live! Friday Abolition Amazing Grace, Michael Apted's drama about the drive to end slavery in the British Empire, opens.
NEWS
By DAVID PITTS | July 26, 2006
In the current flare-up in the Middle East, America is clearly seen around the world as an ally of Israel. That has been the reality for decades. But there was a time when the United States took the side of the Arabs against Israel and our European allies. The occasion was the Suez crisis that began fifty years ago today, an event with profound consequences that extend into the current conflicts involving Israel and Iraq. It was triggered when Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser nationalized the Suez Canal on July 26, 1956.
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III | September 12, 2004
LONDON - Pulling into Paddington Station here last week on the train from Heathrow Airport I noticed a memorial statue at the far end of one of the platforms and went to see what it was. It was a monument to men who had died in World War I and World War II, these particular casualties employees of the Great Western Railway, all 3,700 of them. Three thousand, seven hundred men! All from one company. No names were on the monument, only a large figure of a World War I soldier standing with his head bowed and his helmet in his folded hands.
TOPIC
By Jacob Heilbrunn and Jacob Heilbrunn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 20, 2004
Neoconservatism is finished. According to the conventional wisdom, the Pentagon's top neocons, like Paul D. Wolfowitz, Douglas J. Feith and William J. Luti, have been discredited by the insurgency in Iraq, by Abu Ghraib and by growing public discontent with the war. The United Nations has been invited back - begged, really - while the organization's chief opponent, Richard Perle, has been marginalized. The exposure of Iraqi exile leader Ahmad Chalabi as a charlatan, and possibly an Iranian spy, has delivered the knockout punch.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 8, 2004
A ragtime-pianist priest and a dancing nun are among the four Maryland talents selected to appear in a local performance of Nunsense, which opens next month at the Lyric Opera House. The comic tale depicts nuns who are forced to raise money to cover funeral expenses after most of their order succumbs to food poisoning. On Feb. 4, as part of a benefit-talent-show scene, Sister Teresa Leimbach will dance to a traditional Polish folk tune, and Sister Wanda Zdziarska will sing. Both are members of the Sister Servants of Mary Immaculate convent in Catonsville.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Paul Duke and Paul Duke,Special to the Sun | December 28, 2003
Historians are a pertinacious breed. Never ever do they concede that the knowledge of any one subject has been exhausted, which explains why the life of Winston Churchill continues to serve as a limitless fount of exploration. This is mostly good news. Despite some 650 biographies and other interpretive works already on the shelves, new books with new and fascinating nuggets about the 20th-century's grand old warrior keep rolling out. To a large degree, this reflects the long-standing British mastery of biography, but in the case of Churchill it is much more, something akin to an insatiable and movable love feast.
NEWS
April 3, 1995
HE [H. L. MENCKEN] remained a newspaperman because he liked to sound off, to make a noise. In that respect he did not, in one sense, differ from any other person who has written for a living, whether fiction or fact, prose or poetry. . ."But there were particular compulsions at work within him that made it vital that he do his sounding-off in newsprint. . ."I will remark only on a few of the various needs that propelled him along his way, without attempting to inquire into why they might have done so. These were:"(1)
NEWS
By From Sun news services | July 11, 2009
Michael Jackson's drug history to be probed Detectives investigating the death of Michael Jackson are looking at his prescription drug history and trying to talk with his numerous former doctors, the Los Angeles police chief said. Jackson's father, Joe Jackson, told ABC News in an interview that he believed "foul play" was involved in his son's death. But in the interview aired Friday on Good Morning America, Jackson did not elaborate. Los Angeles Police Chief William Bratton told CNN that police are waiting for the coroner's report before ruling out any possibilities in their "comprehensive" investigation into the sudden death of the 50-year-old pop star two weeks ago. The coroner's report will determine the cause of death and hinges on time-consuming toxicology tests.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 3, 2003
Richard Branson's 15th-century home in Oxfordshire, 70 miles northwest of London, is modest by the standards of his fellow British billionaires. Ducks and geese gather on the streams that run into a nearby lake. It's a tranquil scene, far from the glitter the 53-year-old entrepreneur displays to promote his burgeoning Virgin Group. A year ago, he pumped $160 million of his money into his latest venture, the telecommunications firm Virgin Mobile USA. To publicize the venture, he stripped down to a muscle-enhancing bodysuit with the Broadway cast of The Full Monty on a giant mobile phone dangling above New York's Times Square.
NEWS
February 15, 2002
THE MAN who led New York through its darkest hours now becomes a knight of the British Empire. Taking the Mother Country by storm this week, Rudolph Giuliani, "lately mayor of New York," got his new title Wednesday from Queen Elizabeth II. The ceremony provided another glimpse of a politician's metamorphosis, proof again that in politics a few hours can be a lifetime. Thought of before the attack as a somewhat edgy and authoritarian leader, Mr. Giuliani became the resilient and empathetic symbol of a city and nation that refused to buckle after the twin towers attack.
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