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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 26, 1996
LONDON -- Banned by the European Union and banished by Burger King, British beef suffered another beating yesterday in the wake of the "mad cow disease" crisis.While the British government continued to insist that no other steps were needed to contain the disease, others joined the growing worldwide movement to just say no to British beef.European Union veterinary officials, in a 14-1 vote with Britain standing alone, imposed an immediate and indefinite ban on British beef imports. Nearly all the member states had instituted bans, anyway, and the move doesn't affect Britain's domestic beef trade.
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NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 16, 2000
LONDON -- When your relationship is forged on battlefields like Hastings, Agincourt and Waterloo, there are bound to be a few ups and downs over the years. The British and French just love a good spat. They're in the middle of another one these days, over beef. That's bully to the British, entrecote to the French. More than three years after the "mad cow disease" crisis devastated Britain's beef industry, British beef is back on the world market courtesy of the European Union, which lifted an export ban in August.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 6, 1996
LONDON -- The European Union partly lifted a ban on British beef yesterday, but the action failed to defuse Britain's "mad cow" war against its closest trading partners.European Commission President Jacques Santer told community leaders in Brussels, Belgium, that he hoped the action would lead Britain to abandon its policy of blocking all measures before EU bodies in protest of the ban. But the government of Prime Minister John Major indicated that the British offensive would continue until a full lifting of the export prohibitions.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | November 25, 1998
Georgia's anti-sodomy law conforms to the U.S. Constitution but not to Georgia's constitution. Next question.The stock market is a yo-yo that just hit the top. Guess where it's heading next.Don't look now, but the Glendening cabinet is starting to resemble a Townsend cabinet. He could become her lieutenant governor in four years.Cheer up. British beef is coming back on the market.Pub Date: 11/25/98
BUSINESS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 24, 1998
LONDON -- British beef, anyone?That culinary question may soon be heard in restaurants and butcher shops worldwide as European Union farm ministers voted yesterday to end the international ban on British beef exports imposed 2 1/2 years ago in the wake of the "mad cow" disease crisis.While the first helpings of British roasts and steaks won't hit international tables until early next year, the news that boned beef may soon be exported was greeted with relief by a local industry that has seen its reputation plummet and its finances crippled.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 16, 2000
LONDON -- When your relationship is forged on battlefields like Hastings, Agincourt and Waterloo, there are bound to be a few ups and downs over the years. The British and French just love a good spat. They're in the middle of another one these days, over beef. That's bully to the British, entrecote to the French. More than three years after the "mad cow disease" crisis devastated Britain's beef industry, British beef is back on the world market courtesy of the European Union, which lifted an export ban in August.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | November 25, 1998
Georgia's anti-sodomy law conforms to the U.S. Constitution but not to Georgia's constitution. Next question.The stock market is a yo-yo that just hit the top. Guess where it's heading next.Don't look now, but the Glendening cabinet is starting to resemble a Townsend cabinet. He could become her lieutenant governor in four years.Cheer up. British beef is coming back on the market.Pub Date: 11/25/98
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 7, 1996
LONDON -- Humiliation. In Great Britain, it's the word of the moment as a nation tries to come to terms with the collapse of its $6.5 billion beef industry in the wake of the "mad cow" disease scare.Farmers are furious, slaughterhouses are empty and restaurants are filling their menus with items like kangaroo and ostrich. But the biggest problem is that British beef exports are still banned to every country in the world.British beef remains off the world menu until the European Union lifts the export ban it imposed March 27. And that blockade may not end for a month or more as Britain fashions a plan for the compulsory slaughter of animals most likely to have been exposed to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 11, 1996
PARIS -- In what it called a goodwill gesture in its conflict with its European partners over beef sales, Britain, which has vowed to block European Union decisions until its partners lift a ban on British beef exports, allowed two key measures to go through yesterday.British Foreign Secretary Malcolm Rifkind said at a meeting of European Union foreign ministers in Luxembourg that Britain had decided to show its good will by voting for a European trade pact with Algeria and for an agreement to provide $3.6 million from the European Union to help pay for elections in Bosnia.
NEWS
April 4, 1996
THIRTY SCIENTISTS convened in Geneva by the World Health Organization concluded yesterday that no link is proven between British cattle with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and ten young people who contracted a new strain of Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease (CJD). The experts are confident there is no risk from milk.Simultaneously, yesterday, the agriculture ministers of 15 member countries of the European Union meeting in Brussels condemned 4.7 million British cattle to death over the next six years.
BUSINESS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 24, 1998
LONDON -- British beef, anyone?That culinary question may soon be heard in restaurants and butcher shops worldwide as European Union farm ministers voted yesterday to end the international ban on British beef exports imposed 2 1/2 years ago in the wake of the "mad cow" disease crisis.While the first helpings of British roasts and steaks won't hit international tables until early next year, the news that boned beef may soon be exported was greeted with relief by a local industry that has seen its reputation plummet and its finances crippled.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 6, 1997
LONDON -- Want a sure-fire way to increase sales of beef on the bone?Try to ban it.That seems to be the latest lesson of Britain's struggle with "mad cow" disease.T-bone steaks, ox tails and rib roasts have been cuts of choice at local butcher shops ever since Wednesday, when the British government announced an impending ban on beef on the bone.The ban may not take effect until January after legislation is passed.But meanwhile, British consumers succumbed to a wave of panic buying."I've sold more beef on the bone in the last three days than I had in the last three weeks," said Mark Wormald, who runs a London butcher shop.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 11, 1996
PARIS -- In what it called a goodwill gesture in its conflict with its European partners over beef sales, Britain, which has vowed to block European Union decisions until its partners lift a ban on British beef exports, allowed two key measures to go through yesterday.British Foreign Secretary Malcolm Rifkind said at a meeting of European Union foreign ministers in Luxembourg that Britain had decided to show its good will by voting for a European trade pact with Algeria and for an agreement to provide $3.6 million from the European Union to help pay for elections in Bosnia.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 6, 1996
LONDON -- The European Union partly lifted a ban on British beef yesterday, but the action failed to defuse Britain's "mad cow" war against its closest trading partners.European Commission President Jacques Santer told community leaders in Brussels, Belgium, that he hoped the action would lead Britain to abandon its policy of blocking all measures before EU bodies in protest of the ban. But the government of Prime Minister John Major indicated that the British offensive would continue until a full lifting of the export prohibitions.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 7, 1996
LONDON -- Humiliation. In Great Britain, it's the word of the moment as a nation tries to come to terms with the collapse of its $6.5 billion beef industry in the wake of the "mad cow" disease scare.Farmers are furious, slaughterhouses are empty and restaurants are filling their menus with items like kangaroo and ostrich. But the biggest problem is that British beef exports are still banned to every country in the world.British beef remains off the world menu until the European Union lifts the export ban it imposed March 27. And that blockade may not end for a month or more as Britain fashions a plan for the compulsory slaughter of animals most likely to have been exposed to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)
NEWS
April 4, 1996
THIRTY SCIENTISTS convened in Geneva by the World Health Organization concluded yesterday that no link is proven between British cattle with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and ten young people who contracted a new strain of Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease (CJD). The experts are confident there is no risk from milk.Simultaneously, yesterday, the agriculture ministers of 15 member countries of the European Union meeting in Brussels condemned 4.7 million British cattle to death over the next six years.
NEWS
March 28, 1996
THE DESTRUCTION of confidence in its beef is a tragedy for Britain. The European Union is attempting to impose a world ban on exports of British beef products ranging from beef to cheese to cosmetics. The Irish government is patrolling the border to prevent cattle smuggling.Britain's $6 billion beef industry, the herd of 11 million cattle, the land that raises feed and the farmers who care for them are endangered. So are the government of Prime Minister John Major, accused anew of indecision, and the British place in Europe.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 6, 1997
LONDON -- Want a sure-fire way to increase sales of beef on the bone?Try to ban it.That seems to be the latest lesson of Britain's struggle with "mad cow" disease.T-bone steaks, ox tails and rib roasts have been cuts of choice at local butcher shops ever since Wednesday, when the British government announced an impending ban on beef on the bone.The ban may not take effect until January after legislation is passed.But meanwhile, British consumers succumbed to a wave of panic buying."I've sold more beef on the bone in the last three days than I had in the last three weeks," said Mark Wormald, who runs a London butcher shop.
NEWS
March 28, 1996
THE DESTRUCTION of confidence in its beef is a tragedy for Britain. The European Union is attempting to impose a world ban on exports of British beef products ranging from beef to cheese to cosmetics. The Irish government is patrolling the border to prevent cattle smuggling.Britain's $6 billion beef industry, the herd of 11 million cattle, the land that raises feed and the farmers who care for them are endangered. So are the government of Prime Minister John Major, accused anew of indecision, and the British place in Europe.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 26, 1996
LONDON -- Banned by the European Union and banished by Burger King, British beef suffered another beating yesterday in the wake of the "mad cow disease" crisis.While the British government continued to insist that no other steps were needed to contain the disease, others joined the growing worldwide movement to just say no to British beef.European Union veterinary officials, in a 14-1 vote with Britain standing alone, imposed an immediate and indefinite ban on British beef imports. Nearly all the member states had instituted bans, anyway, and the move doesn't affect Britain's domestic beef trade.
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