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By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | October 6, 2002
TODAY WE HAVE an important art news update from England, or Great Britain, or the United Kingdom, or whatever they're calling it these days. As you may recall, the last time we checked in on the British art community, it had awarded a major art prize, plus 20,000 pounds (about $30,000) to an artist named Martin Creed, for a work entitled The Lights Going On and Off. It consisted of a vacant room in which the lights went on and off. Yes. He got thirty grand for that. Why? Because The Lights Going On and Off possesses the quality that your sophisticated art snot looks for above all else in a work of art, namely: No normal human would ever mistake it for art. Normal humans, confronted with a room containing only blinking lights, would say: "Where's the art?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
In naming Julia Marciari-Alexander as executive director on Wednesday, the Walters Art Museum board of directors entrusted one of Baltimore's most important arts institutions to a rising star — and signaled an emphasis on community engagement even more than on a long history of leading an organization. The Yale-trained Marciari-Alexander, 45, serves as the San Diego Museum of Art's head curator and starts her new post April 1. She will succeed Gary Vikan, who is retiring in June after 27 years at the Walters and who helped the museum become a national leader in rethinking the traditional role of arts institutions.
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NEWS
February 5, 1999
BALTIMOREANS who visit the National Gallery of Art to commune with Rembrandt and Monet without paying should thank a shy billionaire who lived the private life. The gallery was Andrew Mellon's vision, but Paul Mellon's creation.The old man, Andrew, made fortunes through an inherited bank in Pittsburgh. As secretary of the Treasury for Presidents Harding, Coolidge and Hoover in the 1920s, he managed the nation's prosperity and, some say, its subsequent collapse.Andrew concluded that Washington needed a National Gallery of Art like London's after serving as ambassador to Britain.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | May 18, 2003
IT'S TIME FOR an update on the British art world, which, as far as I can tell, exists mainly to provide me with material. As regular readers of this column are aware, British art institutions have taken to paying large sums of money for works of art that can only be described as extremely innovative (I am using "innovative" in the sense of "stupid"). Here are two examples that I've written about: * An artist named Martin Creed won the prestigious Turner Prize, plus 20,000 pounds (about $30,000)
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | May 18, 2003
IT'S TIME FOR an update on the British art world, which, as far as I can tell, exists mainly to provide me with material. As regular readers of this column are aware, British art institutions have taken to paying large sums of money for works of art that can only be described as extremely innovative (I am using "innovative" in the sense of "stupid"). Here are two examples that I've written about: * An artist named Martin Creed won the prestigious Turner Prize, plus 20,000 pounds (about $30,000)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
In naming Julia Marciari-Alexander as executive director on Wednesday, the Walters Art Museum board of directors entrusted one of Baltimore's most important arts institutions to a rising star — and signaled an emphasis on community engagement even more than on a long history of leading an organization. The Yale-trained Marciari-Alexander, 45, serves as the San Diego Museum of Art's head curator and starts her new post April 1. She will succeed Gary Vikan, who is retiring in June after 27 years at the Walters and who helped the museum become a national leader in rethinking the traditional role of arts institutions.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1997
Bagpipes wailed. Punch squabbled with Judy. And Queen Victoria, or someone who looked remarkably like her, strolled regally through the Baltimore Museum of Art.The museum marked the opening yesterday of its most expensive and ambitious exhibition yet with free admission and festivities that ranged from tea parties to puppet shows -- and drew an estimated 4,500 people to view the art, nibble cookies or just make merry."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 22, 2001
LONDON - It's another hard day of performance art and clearing out of closets for Michael Landy. Dressed in a blue boiler suit and standing on a scaffold, the 37-year-old British artist is watching as his lifetime's possessions literally pass along a conveyor belt, each object destined for an industrial shredding machine. He is examining them this one last time in company with an audience of strangers. David Bowie records? To be sent to the shredder. An air intake box from a 1988 Saab 900?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun foreign staff | November 21, 1999
LONDON -- Step inside the Tate Gallery and enjoy a great British modern art duel. In one corner is the Bloomsbury group, the early 20th-century artists and intellectuals who were as renowned for their private affairs as their public works in painting, pottery, furniture and literature. In the other corner is the latest batch of hip, young artists nominated for Britain's top art award, the Turner Prize. Paint is not their thing. And in one famous case, neither is making a bed. From the lines snaking through the galleries and the whirring of cash registers, it's clear that the exhibitions create good box office, while also serving as bookends to Britain's artistic century.
NEWS
September 13, 2000
Donald Gallup, 87, a bibliographer of the poets Ezra Pound and T.S. Eliot, and a benefactor of the Yale Center for British Art, died last Wednesday in New Haven, Conn. The Yale Collection of American Literature, where he had been curator, is preparing to open an exhibit of his collection on Sept. 20. Mr. Gallup confirmed the discovery of a lost Eliot manuscript for "The Waste Land" in 1968. William "Porky" Hill IV, 51, the longtime drummer for the Cate Brothers band, died Saturday in Little Rock, Ark. He had been diagnosed with a blood disorder.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | October 6, 2002
TODAY WE HAVE an important art news update from England, or Great Britain, or the United Kingdom, or whatever they're calling it these days. As you may recall, the last time we checked in on the British art community, it had awarded a major art prize, plus 20,000 pounds (about $30,000) to an artist named Martin Creed, for a work entitled The Lights Going On and Off. It consisted of a vacant room in which the lights went on and off. Yes. He got thirty grand for that. Why? Because The Lights Going On and Off possesses the quality that your sophisticated art snot looks for above all else in a work of art, namely: No normal human would ever mistake it for art. Normal humans, confronted with a room containing only blinking lights, would say: "Where's the art?
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 22, 2001
LONDON - It's another hard day of performance art and clearing out of closets for Michael Landy. Dressed in a blue boiler suit and standing on a scaffold, the 37-year-old British artist is watching as his lifetime's possessions literally pass along a conveyor belt, each object destined for an industrial shredding machine. He is examining them this one last time in company with an audience of strangers. David Bowie records? To be sent to the shredder. An air intake box from a 1988 Saab 900?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun foreign staff | November 21, 1999
LONDON -- Step inside the Tate Gallery and enjoy a great British modern art duel. In one corner is the Bloomsbury group, the early 20th-century artists and intellectuals who were as renowned for their private affairs as their public works in painting, pottery, furniture and literature. In the other corner is the latest batch of hip, young artists nominated for Britain's top art award, the Turner Prize. Paint is not their thing. And in one famous case, neither is making a bed. From the lines snaking through the galleries and the whirring of cash registers, it's clear that the exhibitions create good box office, while also serving as bookends to Britain's artistic century.
NEWS
February 5, 1999
BALTIMOREANS who visit the National Gallery of Art to commune with Rembrandt and Monet without paying should thank a shy billionaire who lived the private life. The gallery was Andrew Mellon's vision, but Paul Mellon's creation.The old man, Andrew, made fortunes through an inherited bank in Pittsburgh. As secretary of the Treasury for Presidents Harding, Coolidge and Hoover in the 1920s, he managed the nation's prosperity and, some say, its subsequent collapse.Andrew concluded that Washington needed a National Gallery of Art like London's after serving as ambassador to Britain.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1997
Bagpipes wailed. Punch squabbled with Judy. And Queen Victoria, or someone who looked remarkably like her, strolled regally through the Baltimore Museum of Art.The museum marked the opening yesterday of its most expensive and ambitious exhibition yet with free admission and festivities that ranged from tea parties to puppet shows -- and drew an estimated 4,500 people to view the art, nibble cookies or just make merry."
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau | September 16, 1993
*TC LONDON -- When a nest of 10 100-million-year-old petrified dinosaur eggs fetches $76,000, it seems only right to praise the common hen, whose eggs are fresher, cheaper and no doubt taste better soft-boiled.At the Bonham's gallery auction yesterday, the eggs from a sauropod, a long-necked plant-eater of the Jurassic period, looked like very, very old blue-gray cupcakes set in mud. But an anonymous and tenacious American buyer bought them, sight unseen, with a telephone bid.He outbid French and German collectors, also on the phone, 1,000-pound bid by 1,000-pound bid. The heated contest ended with applause from the audience as auctioneer Nicholas Bonham banged his gavel on the final bid of 46,000 pounds -- plus a 10 percent "buyer's premium."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 3, 1999
Paul Mellon, the patrician art collector who turned philanthropy into his personal art form, above all through his stewardship of the National Gallery of Art, died on Monday at his home in Upperville, Va. He was 91.Paul Mellon turned from his family's world of banking and business to become an inventive benefactor of the nation's cultural life. The Mellons' gifts to museums, libraries and other causes from parks to poetry to medicine have been estimated at nearly a billion dollars. The money has gone to save seashores and encourage scholars.
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