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By Blair Kamin and Blair Kamin,Chicago Tribune | January 30, 1992
CHICAGO -- The Louvre museum of Paris and Encyclopaedia Britannica Inc. announced Tuesday that the Chicago-based company will distribute a new line of art videos in the United States and Canada, including an acclaimed, behind-the-scenes look at the world-famous French institution.The target market for the videos, which carry retail prices of less than $40, are schools, colleges, public libraries, museum gift shops and videocassette recorder owners in search of a break from Grade B movies.
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Susan Reimer | March 19, 2012
In 1797, the Shaw of Persia received a set of Encyclopedia Britannica to celebrate his elevation. He read it in its entirety - it was shorter then - and in celebration of this accomplishment, he added "Most Formidable Lord and Master of the Encyclopedia Britannica" to his list of titles. I know this because I read it in Wikipedia. It was included in the entry about the Britannica, which had, of course, just been updated to reflect the fact that it would no longer be available in printed form after 244 years and would complete its migration to the Internet.
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By Los Angeles Times | January 23, 1992
The propaganda war over the use of animals in biomedical research has shifted to an improbable battleground -- the august pages of the 224-year-old Encyclopaedia Britannica and, specifically, the latest entry under the heading "Dogs."There, buried in the usual boilerplate -- descendant of wolves, etc. -- the Britannica's dog expert has included what biomedical researchers describe as a little anti-vivisection agitprop."Another common use of dogs, especially purpose-bred beagles, is in biomedical research," part of the offending entry reads.
NEWS
June 26, 2005
Harford County had the first Maryland chapter of the nationally affiliated American Women's Voluntary Services, a social service organization that provided material aid, assistance and information to American armed forces and civilians during World War II. The Harford group was active from June 27, 1941, to June 27, 1947. Members were trained in ambulance driving, evacuation, mobile-kitchen operation, first aid and other emergency services. The entry of the United States into the war increased the number of volunteers, and training in automobile mechanics, cryptography, switchboard operation and other skills was added to the program.
NEWS
By Janny Scott and Janny Scott,Los Angeles Times | January 23, 1992
The grueling propaganda war over the use of animals in biomedical research has shifted to an improbable battleground -- the august pages of the 224-year-old Encyclopaedia Britannica and, specifically, the latest entry under the heading "Dogs."There, buried in the usual boilerplate -- descendant of wolves, impressive olfaction, et cetera -- the Britannica's anointed dog expert has seen fit to include what biomedical researchers, in high dudgeon, describe as a little anti-vivisection agitprop.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 20, 1999
CHICAGO -- Encyclopaedia Britannica, by legend at the top of the knowledge pyramid but nearly toppled by the information age, radically changed course yesterday by offering its mammoth compendium of knowledge on the Internet -- for free."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Patti Hartigan and Patti Hartigan,BOSTON GLOBE | December 20, 1999
When Encyclopedia Britannica announced last month that it was offering its 32-volume set for free on the Internet, up to 15 million people flocked to the Web site, which crashed within hours and was down for days. In a single day, the site attracted more traffic than last month's star-studded Net-Aid concert and last year's Victoria's Secret fashion show combined.Why? Apparently, folks are desperate for credibility on the Internet, and the 231-year-old publisher has a reputation for reliability if not technical prowess.
NEWS
October 28, 1994
John Lautner, 83, an architect whose contemporary design was epitomized by the flying saucer-like Chemosphere House featured in the movie "Body Double," died Monday in Los Angeles. The Encyclopedia Britannica deemed the Chemosphere House in the city's Hollywood Hills the "most modern home built in the world" in 1961.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1999
Vachel Lindsay (1879-1931)American poetVachel Lindsay believed it wasn't enough just to write poetry -- a poet needed to read it as well.Committed to reviving poetry as an oral art form of the common people, Lindsay wrote and read compositions with powerful rhythms that had immediate appeal. Among the 20 or so poems that audiences demanded to hear were "General Booth Enters into Heaven," "The Congo" and "The Santa Fe Trail."Lindsay's popularity declined during the 1920s. He committed suicide by drinking poison.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 4, 1994
In 1994, families with multimedia personal computers are expected to snap up 3 million CD-ROM encyclopedias. But only 500,000 to 700,000 print encyclopedias will be sold, perhaps half the number of five years ago.Families are entranced with getting 20 to 25 volumes of text on a single disk, physically identical to a music CD, for as little as $99, and parents are taking notice of their children's increasing interest in learning from a computer rather than...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Larry Magid and Larry Magid,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 29, 2002
A generation or two ago, encyclopedia salesmen would scour neighborhoods, knocking on doors in search of parents willing to part with several months' pay to help ensure the educational success of their children. Their wares often became a fixture of family rooms, growing old, dusty and woefully out of date. Now you can free up those bookcases for novels or knickknacks and use your personal computer to consult an even more impressive set of up-to-date reference works. There are basically two approaches.
FEATURES
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2001
Baltimore can abide taunting from Washington toadies, forever endure dissing from New York glitterati and may yet survive a possible cold shoulder by the U.S. Olympic Committee. But neglected by Encyclopedia Britannica? When word leaked recently that the consummate chronicler of worldly knowledge had commissioned a set of potentially punky, impressionistic pieces about American places, we called to find out just who would account for Baltimore's magical grit. "Alas, Baltimore is not represented among the cities about which we have these subjective, impressionistic, personal city essays," said Tom Panelas, Britannica's public relations director.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Monty Phan and Monty Phan,NEWSDAY | April 2, 2001
You don't have to go far to find documentation on the decline of the printed encyclopedia. All you need is an Internet connection. And therein lies the problem. As the Net's popularity has risen, the public's interest in shelling out thousands of dollars for dozens of leather-bound reference books has dropped. But don't take our word for it: Check out the "Electronic encyclopaedias" entry at Britannica.com: "By the 1980s and '90s," the entry says, "the phenomenal growth of telecommunications networks and personal computer systems presented a new possibility to the publishing industry - the delivery of encyclopaedic databases through a medium other than the printed page ... "As computer technology continues to develop and is used with greater sophistication, there exists the further possibility that the electronic encyclopaedia will become less a version of the print set than a product in its own right, presenting the database in a manner best suited to exploit the advantages of the electronic medium.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 24, 2000
He was known as "The Man of a Thousand Faces," a master of makeup whose appearance changed from movie to movie. "Don't step on that spider," went a popular joke of the 1920s, "it might be Lon Chaney." But that famous monicker seriously undervalued Chaney, whose acting abilities were far greater than the sum of his grease pencils. He was a marvelously expressive actor, with an unrivaled ability to infuse even the most grotesque characters with a certain nobility, if not make them downright likable.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2000
Encyclopaedia Britannica the most prestigious reference work on the broad range of human knowledge in the years before the 21st century when information was commonly distributed in tightly bound, ink-covered pages known as "books." The Encyclopaedia Britannica was widely admired as comprehensive and authoritative. It was aggressively promoted to parents by a skillful, guilt-inducing sales force. Still, when revolutionary changes in information technology occurred at the end of the 20th century, Britannica proved far too slow-moving.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Patti Hartigan and Patti Hartigan,BOSTON GLOBE | December 20, 1999
When Encyclopedia Britannica announced last month that it was offering its 32-volume set for free on the Internet, up to 15 million people flocked to the Web site, which crashed within hours and was down for days. In a single day, the site attracted more traffic than last month's star-studded Net-Aid concert and last year's Victoria's Secret fashion show combined.Why? Apparently, folks are desperate for credibility on the Internet, and the 231-year-old publisher has a reputation for reliability if not technical prowess.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Larry Magid and Larry Magid,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 29, 2002
A generation or two ago, encyclopedia salesmen would scour neighborhoods, knocking on doors in search of parents willing to part with several months' pay to help ensure the educational success of their children. Their wares often became a fixture of family rooms, growing old, dusty and woefully out of date. Now you can free up those bookcases for novels or knickknacks and use your personal computer to consult an even more impressive set of up-to-date reference works. There are basically two approaches.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1999
Flannery O'Connor 1925-1964After graduating from Georgia State College for Women, Milledgeville, O'Connor studied creative writing at the University of Iowa. Her first novel, "Wise Blood" (1952), explored, in her own words, "religious consciousness without a religion." The work combines the keen ear for common speech, caustic religious imagination and flair for the absurd -- all traits that were to characterize her subsequent novel and collections of short stories. She is regarded as a master of the short story and one collection in particular, "A Good Man is Hard to Find," is a classic.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 20, 1999
CHICAGO -- Encyclopaedia Britannica, by legend at the top of the knowledge pyramid but nearly toppled by the information age, radically changed course yesterday by offering its mammoth compendium of knowledge on the Internet -- for free."
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