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By Anthony Lewis | June 24, 1991
Oxford, England -- IMAGINE RIP VAN Winkle awakening afte decades and finding the politicians of his country arguing exactly the same issue as when he went to sleep. That is what he would find in Britain today: the same old arguments, long since threadbare, about Britain's place in a uniting Europe.Here are the same old fears of wily Continentals and Brussels bureaucrats, the same obsession with "sovereignty." And the same delusion that Britain can go it alone.To find those attitudes still is to confront a painful truth about Britain.
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NEWS
July 4, 2014
Within months of the first shots of what was to become America's Revolutionary War, Maryland mustered troops to join the Continental Army and help newly appointed general George Washington drive the British from Boston. But the willingness to support the armed struggle did not correspond with an inclination toward independence. As was the case generally throughout the colonies in 1775, Maryland's leaders remained steadfast in their hope for a redress of grievances with Great Britain and a peaceable reunion with the crown.
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NEWS
February 22, 2009
On February 19, 2009 ANNA M. BRITAIN. On Wednesday, friends may call at VAUGHN C. GREENE FUNERAL SERVICES (RANDALLSTOWN), 8728 Liberty Road from 4:00-8:00 p.m. On Thursday, Mrs. Britain will lie in state at Progressive First Baptist Church, 3220 Garrison Blvd., where the family will receive friends from 10:00-10:30 a.m. with services to follow. Inquiries to 410-655-0015.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | May 24, 2014
President Barack Obama Wednesday replayed a familiar scenario when dealing with scandal, in this case delays for treatment, deaths, alleged cover-ups and other acts of malfeasance reported at Veterans Administration hospitals in the United States: first express outrage, next announce an investigation and then say he won't comment on the scandal until the results of the investigation are in, promising people will be held "accountable," if they violated...
NEWS
November 27, 1990
LONDON -- Chancellor of the Exchequer John Major was assured today of becoming Britain's next prime minister after both rivals in a Conservative Party leadership election conceded victory to him.Major won 185 votes, two less than the simple majority required for election. Former Defense Secretary Michael Heseltine had 131 votes; Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd had 56 votes.Hurd said that the party rules required a third ballot, even though he and Heseltine had conceded that Major would be the winner.
NEWS
By Adrian Wooldridge | November 7, 1997
IMAGINE an America in which President Clinton enjoys almost untrammeled power. The Republicans are reduced to a tiny rump, brain dead and rudderless, while the Democrats, newly instructed in the art of party discipline, stand at their leader's beck and call. The think tanks, pressure groups and shock jocks of the right, once so cocky and cacophonous, have fallen silent.Adjust for national differences and that, more or less, is the state of politics in Britain. In the 1980s, when Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher was in her pomp and the Labor Party was divided and irrelevant, the left complained that Britain had become a one-party state; even some Thatcherites worried that ''bourgeois triumphalism'' was leaving the poor without a voice.
NEWS
October 15, 1990
Britain's sudden entry into the European Monetary System after 11 years of staying out is a welcome U-turn by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. It suggests that Britain means to play its full role in Europe as a counterweight to united Germany, and feels up to it. Only a year ago, the highly respected chancellor of the exchequer, Nigel Lawson, resigned when Mrs. Thatcher vetoed his effort to link the pound to the European Community currencies. Now Mr. Lawson's successor, John Major, has done it with her blessing.
SPORTS
By Don Markus | June 26, 1992
WIMBLEDON, England -- Jeremy Bates, Britain's last hope at Wimbledon, continued his run with a straight-set victory over Javier Sanchez of Spain.Bates, criticized by the local press for years, kept his battle with Fleet Street reporters alive after his 7-6 (7-4), 6-3, 6-4 victory."I don't have a deal with the press. I honestly don't. A lot of this is in your mind," said Bates, who advanced to the third round for the first time since 1987. "I had people taking pictures of my house yesterday.
NEWS
By Jonathan Power | May 9, 1997
LONDON -- If Britain's defeated prime minister, John Major, had any real commitment to Europe he betrayed it by the timing of his resignation as leader of the Conservative party.Privately he touts as his successor Chris Patten, the most pro-Europe of senior Conservatives, but by resigning immediately he has made it impossible for Mr. Patten to throw his hat in the ring. Mr. Patten's current preoccupation as governor of Hong Kong precludes involvement with British electoral politics until the hand-over of Hong Kong to China in seven weeks.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | May 3, 1992
LONDON -- Is socialism trying to creep into Britain through the back door of Europe, as Margaret Thatcher once warned? It may be.To prevent that in 1989, Britain's then-prime minister and apostle of the free market rejected the so-called "social charter" advanced by most other members of the European Community. It would have regulated the wages, hours, working conditions for women and children, and holidays across the whole of the EC.Prime Minister John Major, convinced that Mrs. Thatcher was right to do this, went to the EC summit at Maastricht in the Netherlands last December and excluded Britain from the Social Chapter of the treaty that the summit produced.
NEWS
November 28, 2013
Columnist Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s suggestion that "the transformative promises of the British Labor Party in 1945 are remarkably similar to progressives' promises of today" is a stretch way too far from reality, even when wrapped up in Winston Churchill's halo ( "The challenges Churchill faced nearly 70 years ago mirror those of today," Nov. 24). The last time I looked, American progressives were not advocating the nationalization of coal, utilities, steel and transportation, as the Labor government did after World War II. And the UK's National Health Service bears little resemblance to the Affordable Care Act. The NHS is a single-payer system that avoids the byzantine nonsense that has been foisted on the American people in the name of compromise.
NEWS
October 30, 2013
(Originally published December 26, 1943) For an hour yesterday, over a radio network that extended through Maryland and into Pennsylvania and Virginia, a special Sunpapers' Christmas broadcast brought to their folk and friends back home the voices and music of more than two-score soldiers from the three states who are stationed in the British Isles. The broadcast came from an army camp “somewhere in England” where invasion forces are training, and from a base of the Eighth Air Force elsewhere in the British Isles, through arrangements with the Army Special Services and the British Broadcast Corporation.
NEWS
July 29, 2013
In response to the commentary, "The royal treatment" (July 25), I would like as a British national to acknowledge that not all of us revel in the antiquated institution known as the monarchy. I refer to the 1975 film, "Monty Python and The Holy Grail" and the "How do you become king then" conversation to put the matter in appropriate context. Mark Hopwood
NEWS
April 16, 2013
While the mainstream media in America love to wax poetic about former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, the sainted "Iron Lady" of the Cold War, it might be wise to remember the real person behind the carefully polished myth ("Margaret Thatcher made history by standing firm," April 11). Let's not forget that while she often played up her "blue collar" roots, her sudden rise to fame and fortune was actually bankrolled by her husband Dennis, a millionaire businessman, and that her economic policies resulted in the disappearance of countless small businesses and their replacement by mega-corporations like Walmart.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 3, 2013
The government in Britain recently did something interesting. It asked everyone receiving an "incapacity benefit" -- a disability program slowly being phased out under new reforms -- to submit to a medical test to confirm they were too disabled to work. A third of recipients (878,000 people) didn't even bother and dropped out of the program rather than be examined. Of those tested, more than half (55 percent) were found fit for work, and a quarter were found fit for some work. But that's Britain, where there's a long tradition of gaming the dole.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Prepare for the British Invasion. This one, however, will be of the floral, not musical, variety. The nearly 200-year-old Philadelphia Flower Show runs March 2-10 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. This year's theme is "Brilliant!" with exhibits focusing on the landscapes, culture and beauty of Great Britain. The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society , which sponsors the event, has teamed up with Britain's Royal Horticultural Society to bring British designers, experts and presentations to the show, including Mark Lane, the head gardener for Buckingham Palace.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | December 29, 1990
LONDON -- Britain yesterday began drafting military reservists for service in the Persian Gulf after too few responded to a call for volunteers.The move provoked immediate protests from some reservists, who said they enrolled in the part-time military service to defend Britain from external attack, not to fight in a foreign country.In a protest broadcast on the BBC, one reservists asked: "Why should I put my life on the line to defend one dictatorship from another?"A nursing director told Independent Television News she felt "ambiguous" about going to the gulf, reluctant to leave her civilian responsibilities here but ready to fulfill her military role there.
BUSINESS
July 4, 1997
For the first time, shippers have a weekly consolidation service that moves cargo directly between the Britain and Baltimore without stopping in other ports.The service was launched recently by Samuel Shapiro & Co., a Baltimore-based freight forwarder and customs broker that acts as a travel agent for cargo. Sailing from Liverpool every Saturday and arriving in Baltimore 13 days later, the service cuts transit times by two to three days.Consolidated service is used by shippers who need to move goods between two points but don't have enough to fill an entire 20- or 40-foot steel box, known as a shipping container.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | August 2, 2012
Mitt Romney and I are competing in a new Olympic event that involves proffering unvarnished criticism of the Olympics themselves. We're the Lochte and Phelps of this event -- appearing united when necessary and when it serves us both, and appearing divided when Mitt says something really stupid. Last week, I blamed cronyism for the awarding of the sole-source security contract for the entire Olympic Games to a company that failed to deliver, requiring the British military to step in at the last minute to pick up the slack.
TRAVEL
By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
As excitement builds for this week's opening of the Summer Olympics, many an armchair athlete may yearn to hop a transcontinental flight to London. But if a trip overseas isn't in the cards right now, why not discover a taste of jolly olde England closer to home? The nation's capital offers its own brand of proper British attractions, dining and lodging, say experts, suitable for even the most discerning Anglophile. "There are actually quite a few similarities between Europe and Washington, D.C., and one can certainly discover elements of British culture close to home," says Georgia Johnson Kicklighter of American Express Travel.
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