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SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | September 9, 2013
One might think it would be tough to find a positive in the Ravens secondary after Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning threw for seven touchdowns Thursday night. After all, Corey Graham had his rockiest game with the Ravens, Michael Huff did not cover or tackle well and Jimmy Smith got beat for a touchdown, too. But in his return to a real game after his second anterior cruciate ligament injury in four years, Lardarius Webb gave the Ravens a little something to feel good about by playing 62 of the 71 defensive snaps against the Broncos -- and playing well.
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NEWS
By Diana Nguyen and Capital News Service | January 25, 2010
Hermine Duebsie needs this job. She holds her application and I-9 Employment Eligibility Verification Form in hand and waits for a proctor from the U.S. Census Bureau to administer a basic skills test. The test, meant to be fairly simple - gauging skills in reading, basic math, map reading and following instructions - is a deciding factor in securing a part-time, six-to-10-week interviewer's job with a flexible schedule and $18.50 an hour, a rate that varies by location. "The pay is great, and it's a government job. I think this job is most important," said Duebsie, a Montgomery County Community College student with no other source of income.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2010
Mercy Medical Center is converting a former Giant grocery store in Lutherville into a hub where patients can go for lab work, minor surgeries and to visit primary care physicians. Urgent care centers such as Patient First and Doctors Express are taking over retail spaces in high-traffic areas, including where a Roy Rogers fast-food restaurant was once located. And Thomson Reuters this summer opened its first branch dedicated to health care research in Woodlawn office space, where more than two dozen employees will provide data and analysis to the federal government.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | May 16, 2002
I CATCH UP with Allan Prell at the sumptuous Reisterstown home of Morris the Remodeler, where the two are rehearsing a TV commercial that may set the advertising industry back 200 years. Right now, they're strolling with umbrellas in Morris' driveway and croaking their way through "Singin' in the Rain," thus doing permanent damage to the memory of Gene Kelly and the 1952 classic. "It may be so dreadful, it's good," Prell says of the commercial for his longtime buddy, home-remodeling guru Morris Ellin.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | March 17, 2000
It's no secret that sports television is an analyst-driven medium, and no more so than during the NCAA tournament. Sure, the play-by-play man frames the action, but it's the color guy who sets the tone and benevolently dictates how we, the home viewer, will see what we see. In that regard, there is no more kindly dictator than CBS analyst Bill Raftery, who is working the tournament games from Minneapolis, including tomorrow's second-round action....
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry | November 25, 1991
Loyola dropped its first two games on the West Coast in the Apple Invitational Tournament at Stanford, but the box scores from those contests indicate Greyhound followers will get a real treat when Michael Reese makes his Baltimore debut Dec. 3.Reese, a 6-foot-8 transfer from Boston College, made an impressive Loyola debut, averaging 26 points and 7.5 rebounds, and was the only Greyhound on the all-tournament team. Reese had 18 points and seven rebounds in Friday's 98-56 loss to host Stanford and followed with a 34-point, eight-rebound effort in Saturday's 90-82 loss to Pacific in the consolation game.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | November 25, 1991
Not all the news from Annapolis has been gloomy this year. Lottery players, at least, are holding up their end of the state budget.The Maryland Lottery Agency said today the state netted $6.4 million more during the first four months of this fiscal year than during the same period last year, a gain of more than 6 percent.By comparison, the state's total lottery revenues climbed $4.4 million in all of fiscal 1991 compared with the year before."We are up in net earnings as well as total sales in spiteof the recession and the economy," said lottery spokesman Carroll H. Hynson Jr. He credited the agency's "tremendous effort insofar as changing the games and being creative."
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | February 3, 2002
ORANGES HELP ME make it through the winter. Their bright color, their tangy flavor and their powerful aroma stand in marked contrast to days that are often dim, dull and repetitive. Traditionally one bright spot in the gray season has been the arrival of a box of navel oranges from Arizona. They are part of a cross-country exchange of holiday foodstuffs among family members. My sister-in-law ships oranges from Phoenix to Baltimore, and we in turn ship homemade fruitcake from Baltimore to Phoenix.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | July 9, 2000
As the Orioles limp into the All-Star break in the same, sad shape as a year ago, former manager Ray Miller, the anointed scapegoat for the debacle of 1999, surely is feeling vindicated. The 2000 season has been a carbon copy of '99 in many ways, with a weak bullpen, a lack of speed and general mediocrity consigning the Orioles to the depths of the American League East. Replacing Miller with Mike Hargrove hasn't seemed to help much, at least not with the won-lost record. But when you dig below the record, you find evidence that, strangely enough, the disappointing first half of 2000 actually has confirmed that Hargrove is a major upgrade over his fired predecessor.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | March 31, 2001
I DON'T THINK there's a room in my house I can't associate with Hilda Wilson, the lampshade diva of Towson. Mrs. Wilson, as she was known, was an indomitable businesswoman who sold lampshades and lamp parts from an old-fashioned store on the York Road in the heart of old Towson. Mrs. Wilson, who died last week at 95 and is being buried today, was a character. A staunch and effective proponent of boosting the Baltimore County seat she so admired, she was also a presence in the domain of home lighting.
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