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NEWS
By Al Haas and Al Haas,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 16, 1992
The sporty new Paseo is a handsome little coupe. But beauty is only skin deep, and beneath this particular epidermis is the worst Toyota I've ever driven.That's not to say it's a bad automobile. It isn't. But it is a pretty poor effort from an automaker of Toyota's caliber. Driving it is sort of like reading a D-plus paper by a student who usually does A and B work. Its base price is $9,988. The test model price was $12,043.The Paseo is a sporty coupe spinoff on the Tercel, Toyota's econobox.
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FEATURES
March 25, 2003
Maybe we should have hired a bracket-picking monkey after all. As the NCAA men's basketball tournament heads into the Sweet 16, the Today section's randomly filled-out bracket is not doing so hot. In the opening round of 32 games, we went 12-20 with our picks, chosen out of a hat by a pair of slightly higher primates, college interns. In the second round of 16 games completed Sunday, our record was a spectacularly awful 3-13. But what can you expect when the random selection process gives you Texas Southern in the Sweet 16, San Diego in the Elite 8, and IUPUI in the Final Four?
NEWS
May 20, 1999
This is an excerpt of an editorial published Tuesday in Tages-Anzeiger of Zurich, Switzerland.WHO is to blame? In Russian history, so rich in tragedy, this question is asked again and again. Because the individual was not ready to assume the responsibility, the questions could also be suppressed in the collectivity. Nobody was called to account.In the debate over impeaching President Boris Yeltsin, the Russian parliament was again asking the question "Who is to blame?" This time it was over the responsibility for the emotions and mistakes of the previous 10 years: the breakup of the Soviet Union, the war against Chechnya, the failed economic reforms.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | March 9, 2003
U.S. home prices rose 0.83 percent in the fourth quarter, the smallest gain in five years, as the economy slowed, a government report showed last week. The rate of increase dropped from a revised 1.46 percent gain in the prior quarter and a 2.38 percent jump in the second quarter, according to the Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight, a government agency that oversees mortgage buyers Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. In Maryland, home prices rose 1.27 percent in the quarter and 10.82 percent for the year - the sixth best in the nation.
NEWS
December 28, 2001
HOW MANY kids attend Baltimore's public schools? How often do teachers miss work? What's the relationship between class size, poverty rate and test scores? If you know the answers to those questions, you've got one on city school officials. For years, they've run the system virtually blindfolded -- unable to see clearly what goes on in each and every building, with each and every child they're educating. No wonder many of their decisions have seemed like frantic grasps in the dark. They'll finally see the light next week, though, when SchoolStat, a derivative of the comprehensive data-tracking systems that now shape Police Department and city government policies, makes its debut.
NEWS
June 17, 2004
FOR TEACHERS and principals of Baltimore's public schools, and for the students themselves, the double-digit rise in test scores announced this week feels like vindication. They achieved welcome academic gains in every grade and almost every subject on statewide exams while enduring a fiscal disaster. Amid layoffs, political fights, management upheaval and calls for wage concessions, the teachers taught and the students learned. The Maryland School Assessments were administered to students at the height of the chaos.
BUSINESS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1995
It looks like a rerun. After a year of weak retail sales, analysts say they are expecting few dramatic changes in 1996."Still sluggish at best," said Mark A. Millman, president of Millman Search Group Inc., a leading retail consulting firm in Lutherville. "People are cautious. They can make do with what they have. They're spending money on big-ticket items. The days of the '80s and yuppies and having the import designer label is out. People are more conscious of pricing. Department stores have gotten more promotional, and everything's on sale all the time.
SPORTS
By Tara Finnegan and Tara Finnegan,Contributing Writer | March 3, 1993
There were ups and downs, but it was a roller-coaster ride Don DeVoe was prepared to take in his first season as Navy men's basketball coach.Before coming to Navy, DeVoe had rebuilt programs at Virginia Tech and Tennessee. Now, in Annapolis, in the first of a five-year contract, he is attempting another renovation."It's everything I thought it would be," said DeVoe, who is in his 20th season of Division I coaching. "I still consider this to be my ultimate challenge."This season didn't get off to the best of starts for DeVoe and the Midshipmen.
BUSINESS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | May 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Limp consumer demand and poor export performance reduced the nation's economic growth during the first quarter to its weakest pace in more than a year, according to revised figures released yesterday.Gross domestic product, the total output of goods and services in the United States, clocked in at a sluggish annual growth rate of 0.9 percent, well below official and private expectations and far behind the robust 4.9 percent spurt in the final quarter of last year. The level was just half the preliminary estimate of 1.8 percent released a month ago.The anemic domestic growth was compounded by recession in Europe and Japan, which held down demand in two of the nation's major export markets and left the United States with its largest trade gap in four years, a revised $29.07 billion for the first quarter.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | July 6, 2005
SO THIS IS what we've come to as the Orioles limp toward the All-Star break looking less and less like a serious playoff contender: Ray Miller may have to change his signature slogan to "Work fast. Throw strikes. Duck!" The latest starter to employ this new philosophy was Rodrigo Lopez, who took the mound on three days' rest yesterday and quickly surrendered 10 runs, which - if you're still looking for bright spots - at least erased any chance of the Orioles wasting another exciting comeback.
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