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Bright Red

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NEWS
By William Amelia | October 15, 1993
In the garden,red runs throughthe month of October.The dogwood's leaves twistand turn to scarletthen curl and fall.The tree's fruit shinesa bright red, attractingneighborhood cardinals.Soon the berries are goneand the color chain is brokenuntil an unusual visitor,a rose breasted grosbeak,its rose-red patch vivid,stokes the garden's fire.
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NEWS
By Kathy Van Mullekom and Kathy Van Mullekom,Daily Press | February 18, 2007
Doris and Jim Eagle are avid gardeners who want their yard to look good any time of the year. During winter, they know Father Time tells roses and hydrangeas to slumber, so they turn to Mother Nature's wakeup call for plants that produce wintertime berries. For several years, they've enjoyed the cold weather beauty of a pyracantha bush - laden with orange-red fruits - they've slowly trained into a taller-than-Doris wreath. "The wreath has been fun to play with - trimming and having birds build nests in it - and decorating it with my giant Halloween spider web in the center for fall," says Doris, who is a Yorktown, Va., resident and longtime master gardener.
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FEATURES
February 8, 1996
Valentine's Day is the occasion for romantic gifts. Beyond the traditional roses, scent and chocolates there other creative ways to say "I love you." Here are some suggestions from the folks at Aveda and Sears.* Create a romantic setting and "dinner for two." Fill a basket with red wine, cheeses and warm, toasty loaves of French bread. Add jellies or jams, candy, spiced apple tea and a heart-patterned tablecloth and napkins* For the woman who loves to garden, spray a large watering can with glossy, bright red paint and include a mix of garden supplies -- red apron or work gloves, seed packs of red peppers, red flowers, tomatoes.
NEWS
By Norman Winter and Norman Winter,Knight Ridder / Tribune | April 4, 2004
Sometimes we garden writers get presumptuous and assume that everyone is growing a certain plant, so I was taken aback a little the other day when I did an informal survey during a seminar. Only a small minority raised their hands when asked if they were growing the 'Dragon Wing,' which I consider the most beautiful landscape begonia in world. The 'Dragon Wing' red begonia works great in full sun or partial shade. In full sun, the plant is more compact and the foliage develops a reddish cast.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | February 17, 1999
So you're driving one night along U.S. 29 in suburban Columbia toward your home on Happy Heart Lane, when, suddenly, you find yourself wondering: What's that bright red glow coming from across the Town Center lakefront?And then you realize: Why, it's a great big neon sign!This is not a vision seen very often in Columbia, a planned community known, among other things, for its strict rules on signage. Its marketing motto might be: No 50-foot golden arches or gas station markers here.Which is why some locals have been surprised to see the shining red advertisement on two sides of the 10-story Sheraton hotel in the middle of what was intended to be Columbia's downtown.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | July 22, 2001
IT HAS BEEN a big week for berries. Recently, I wrote about discovering the fact that dewberries, wild blackberries, were growing here in Maryland. Since then I have been deluged with letters, calls and tips from fans of various local berries. William H. Sewell of Kingsville wrote in to say he understood why dewberry picking had received little publicity. When you pick dewberries, he said, you often end up covered with bug bites. "When I was growing up across the road from my grandparents' farm in Abingdon, Harford County, we children would frequently pick dewberries on the farm," he wrote.
FEATURES
By David Birchman | March 18, 1998
Deep dark down - I mean,deep deep dark down in the bayou -where the bones of the band in a jumble lie,there rests the blues in a pool of oozewith the ghosts of the bygone-bye.Long ago when it was wondrous warmand steamy swamps spread all across this land,you could feel the heat off Basin Streetfrom Billy Bronto's Band.Man, the place was a kitchen!And that kitchen was hot cause the band was cookin'!There was Rex the King Tyrone on the slide tromboneand Brother Billy on the bass.There was a mean allosaurus saxophonistnicknamed Lizard Lips Grace.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | January 5, 2003
It's hard to say what's most striking about Chicago showgirl Velma Kelly -- the bright red lips, the smoky eyes, the short dresses with sequined strands that seductively dust her behind, or the fact that she shot her husband with no regrets. The combination of elements, however, makes for a stirring, dangerous beauty that men want to touch and women want to possess. Velma (played by Catherine Zeta-Jones) and her Chicago showgirl-inmate counterparts are the latest permutations of femme fatales on the American big screen.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 1, 2003
THE LADY in red's flouncing her way across her own private emotional ZIP code. Oblivious to the big crowd behind her, and absent all sense of inhibition, she's dancing in front of the bandstand in Patterson Park all by herself, with a bottle of water in one hand and a diet soda in the other, while a group called Patrick Alban y Noche Latina plays acoustic rock with a Latin beat. The lady's beautiful to behold. Outfitted in bright red minidress, bright red hat, high black boots and black bloomers that unfortunately begin to appear beneath her abbreviated hem line, she's shaking everything in her considerable frame under a relentless Saturday afternoon sun at LatinoFest 2003.
NEWS
By Ellen Kirvin Dudis | May 24, 1991
IT HAPPENED shortly before Easter.The man and his wife were working in the nursery behind their house. House and nursery sit a good way back in the field, on the east side of their farm near Pocomoke City. Glancing up, the couple saw a bright red car stop on the county road which bounds their property on the south. There, covering the little hill, where one of two tall pines sports a "No Trespassing" sign, spring's first explosion of daffodils was in full bloom.A woman got out of the car and began picking flowers.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 1, 2003
THE LADY in red's flouncing her way across her own private emotional ZIP code. Oblivious to the big crowd behind her, and absent all sense of inhibition, she's dancing in front of the bandstand in Patterson Park all by herself, with a bottle of water in one hand and a diet soda in the other, while a group called Patrick Alban y Noche Latina plays acoustic rock with a Latin beat. The lady's beautiful to behold. Outfitted in bright red minidress, bright red hat, high black boots and black bloomers that unfortunately begin to appear beneath her abbreviated hem line, she's shaking everything in her considerable frame under a relentless Saturday afternoon sun at LatinoFest 2003.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | January 5, 2003
It's hard to say what's most striking about Chicago showgirl Velma Kelly -- the bright red lips, the smoky eyes, the short dresses with sequined strands that seductively dust her behind, or the fact that she shot her husband with no regrets. The combination of elements, however, makes for a stirring, dangerous beauty that men want to touch and women want to possess. Velma (played by Catherine Zeta-Jones) and her Chicago showgirl-inmate counterparts are the latest permutations of femme fatales on the American big screen.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | November 18, 2001
For a restaurant whose founder is a celebrity TV chef and cookbook author, Roy's arrival on the Baltimore dining scene in late August was remarkably quiet. Roy is Roy Yamaguchi, and Roy's is one of a new breed of upscale casual restaurants that don't quite fall into the chain category, even though Roy's Baltimore is No. 25. When you get this kind of sticker shock at the end of a meal -- we spent $75 a person -- you want to think of the restaurant as one of a kind. Roy's executive chefs create their own menus at individual locations, which gives each Roy's an independent restaurant feel.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | July 22, 2001
IT HAS BEEN a big week for berries. Recently, I wrote about discovering the fact that dewberries, wild blackberries, were growing here in Maryland. Since then I have been deluged with letters, calls and tips from fans of various local berries. William H. Sewell of Kingsville wrote in to say he understood why dewberry picking had received little publicity. When you pick dewberries, he said, you often end up covered with bug bites. "When I was growing up across the road from my grandparents' farm in Abingdon, Harford County, we children would frequently pick dewberries on the farm," he wrote.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2000
Traditionally winter apples have been as bright red as a fire truck. A box of glowing, Red Delicious apples, grown on the slopes of Washington state and shipped across the country, has been a common gift, a quick, often last-minute answer to the question of what to get the far-flung relatives or favored clients at year's end. But lately there is talk among apple aficionados that redder is not necessarily better. A near-record harvest this fall has left a glut of apples on the market and a lingering concern that the Red Delicious, long regarded as the crown prince of the 2,500 apple varieties grown in the United States, is not what it used to be. In the pursuit of a prettier, more uniform apple, growers have over the years introduced new harvesting techniques and new types of Red Delicious.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | February 17, 1999
So you're driving one night along U.S. 29 in suburban Columbia toward your home on Happy Heart Lane, when, suddenly, you find yourself wondering: What's that bright red glow coming from across the Town Center lakefront?And then you realize: Why, it's a great big neon sign!This is not a vision seen very often in Columbia, a planned community known, among other things, for its strict rules on signage. Its marketing motto might be: No 50-foot golden arches or gas station markers here.Which is why some locals have been surprised to see the shining red advertisement on two sides of the 10-story Sheraton hotel in the middle of what was intended to be Columbia's downtown.
FEATURES
By Liz Rittersporn and Liz Rittersporn,New York Daily News | October 23, 1991
Any minute now, you'll reach for your trusty winter coat. And horrors! That same warm wrap that saw you through several years of weather both fair and foul may look a little wilted, a little tired around the edges.The very idea of buying a new coat is daunting. Unlike purchasing a new dress or sweater, buying a winter coat is a real commitment. It will have to see you through snow and slush, and it will have to cover you (and most of the clothes you own) from dawn through dusk for at least a couple of years.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2000
Traditionally winter apples have been as bright red as a fire truck. A box of glowing, Red Delicious apples, grown on the slopes of Washington state and shipped across the country, has been a common gift, a quick, often last-minute answer to the question of what to get the far-flung relatives or favored clients at year's end. But lately there is talk among apple aficionados that redder is not necessarily better. A near-record harvest this fall has left a glut of apples on the market and a lingering concern that the Red Delicious, long regarded as the crown prince of the 2,500 apple varieties grown in the United States, is not what it used to be. In the pursuit of a prettier, more uniform apple, growers have over the years introduced new harvesting techniques and new types of Red Delicious.
FEATURES
By David Birchman | March 18, 1998
Deep dark down - I mean,deep deep dark down in the bayou -where the bones of the band in a jumble lie,there rests the blues in a pool of oozewith the ghosts of the bygone-bye.Long ago when it was wondrous warmand steamy swamps spread all across this land,you could feel the heat off Basin Streetfrom Billy Bronto's Band.Man, the place was a kitchen!And that kitchen was hot cause the band was cookin'!There was Rex the King Tyrone on the slide tromboneand Brother Billy on the bass.There was a mean allosaurus saxophonistnicknamed Lizard Lips Grace.
FEATURES
February 8, 1996
Valentine's Day is the occasion for romantic gifts. Beyond the traditional roses, scent and chocolates there other creative ways to say "I love you." Here are some suggestions from the folks at Aveda and Sears.* Create a romantic setting and "dinner for two." Fill a basket with red wine, cheeses and warm, toasty loaves of French bread. Add jellies or jams, candy, spiced apple tea and a heart-patterned tablecloth and napkins* For the woman who loves to garden, spray a large watering can with glossy, bright red paint and include a mix of garden supplies -- red apron or work gloves, seed packs of red peppers, red flowers, tomatoes.
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