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By Elsa Klensch and Elsa Klensch,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 25, 1997
I don't think my wardrobe bothered her before we were married, but my new bride now complains that the colors I mix are so flashy they give her a headache.I love the look and I'm not eager to change the way I dress just to please her. To get her off my back, however, I am willing to compromise.How can I wear strong, bright colors and still be in style?I posed your question to Italian designer Kean Etro whose fall collection shows ways to layer with strong colors and patterns.He's all for adding spice to a man's wardrobe, and for Etro the stronger the color the better:"The key to mixing colors is to stay within the same chromatic boundaries.
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By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2012
An assessment of Stacy Keibler's attire this awards season reads like a children's bedtime story. Her Snooki-esque poofed hair and simple black dress lacked sophistication at the Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala on Jan. 7. Her updo and crystal embellished gown screamed "too matronly" at the National Board of Review Awards gala on Jan. 10. But fashion critics said she hit her stride at the Golden Globe Awards on Jan. 15 with a...
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FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1998
In a world where gray is the new black, Ellen Morriss is a bold champion of color.It's a cause that goes way back: During her senior year at art school, Morriss, 38, made a "coat of many colors" from more than 100 knitted and crocheted patches. Tall and lanky, Morriss wears her own loom-knitted sweater coats, sweaters, vests and jackets with elegant ease.But the North Baltimore mother of two boys also designs with women of all shapes and sizes in mind, as will be colorfully clear at her booth (#82)
EXPLORE
October 27, 2011
Before I get down to the nitty gritty, let me say that I fully agree with The Aegis' sports editor Randy McRoberts, who voiced his distaste in Wednesday's paper on how the MPSSAA decided to move Class 2A teams into the 1A field hockey tournament in order to better fill out the brackets. That move does not sit well with me, and if I were a coach or player on the Havre de Grace, Perryville or Bohemia Manor teams, which are the only true 1A schools playing in the North bracket, I'd write a strongly worded letter to the powers that be. I am not trashing the efforts of the MPSSAA, which, like every scholastic athletic association in the country has a tough, thankless job, and I appreciate the work it puts forth (seriously, in four-plus years of trying to pick fights with various people, teams, organizations, coaches, etc. with this column, the only time I ever wrote anything bad about the MPSSAA was after some goon with a walkie talkie tried to beat me up for attempting to do an on-field interview with Fallston's Caitlin Dempsey, after she scored a double-overtime goal in the Cougars' 1-0 victory over Bethesda-Chevy Chase in the 2007 Class 3A state title game)
NEWS
By Cheryl Johnston and Cheryl Johnston,Sun Staff | August 31, 2003
Decorating the dorm has come a long way since the days of using an old trunk as a table and cinder blocks to raise the bed. Dorm furnishings and accessories are now so stylish, compact and affordable that they are winning fans who graduated from college long ago. "We do see quite a bit of crossover. The design is universal," says Brie Heath, spokeswoman for Target, which has a line of trendy home furnishings by designer Todd Oldham. After all, who couldn't use a new futon, desk organizer, storage unit or lamp?
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | April 20, 1997
We're expecting our first child, and would like some ideas on how to design the baby's room. The space we'll be using is larger than most nurseries -- big enough, in fact, to serve as a bedroom as the child grows older. We'd therefore appreciate tips on adapting and converting the original design to meet changing needs.Your approach is a smart one. And with some careful planning, the project won't be difficult to carry out.To design a nursery successfully, one needs to know a bit about child development.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | April 20, 1997
We're expecting our first child, and would like some ideas on how to design the baby's room. The space we'll be using is larger than most nurseries -- big enough, in fact, to serve as a bedroom as the child grows older. We'd therefore appreciate tips on adapting and converting the original design to meet changing needs.Your approach is a smart one. And with some careful planning, the project won't be difficult to carry out.To design a nursery successfully, one needs to know a bit about child development.
FEATURES
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | July 20, 1997
Grab your sunglasses. Brights are back.Mango and tangerine make bold statements next to strawberry or electric grape, and citrus shades of lemon and lime are electrifying side by side with cobalt blue and turquoise. In short, fruity hues are juicing up the home fashion scene, just as they're adding sparkle to apparel.And the trend isn't restricted to walls, fabrics and furnishings. Sassy solids and perky patterns are coloring utilitarian objects such as toothbrushes, razors, scissors, tape dispensers, plastic storage containers, dinnerware and candlestick holders.
FEATURES
By YOLANDA GARFIELD | April 28, 1991
Summertime, and living's easier in the freshest, airiest rooms this side of a greenhouse. Special paint effects and clear, bright colors, a-sizzle with cool style, transform the soo-so to spectacular.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts | August 29, 1993
The vest has achieved new status. No longer the third wheel of a three-piece suit, it now makes itself known in bright colors, lavish fabrics and ornate details. It can come in tweed, brocade ++ or velvet. It can be knitted, embroidered or patched. It may be finished with fancy leathers, applique or precious buttons.The one thing it can't be, is dull.
EXPLORE
June 8, 2011
It's June, the month of the strawberry moon, according to Native American lore. In our neighborhood, it is the month of roses. Guilford's gardens are abloom with roses of every variety and hue. At our house, careful watering through the recent heat wave have produced a plethora of blooms, many of them from heirloom plants, a legacy of a former owner. From palest pink to deepest crimson, they are a joy to behold. We do not grow strawberry plants, but we do see tiny pears on our tree, a promise of luscious fruits in just a few weeks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2010
Maybe it is the bright lights on its facade, or the vivid colors of the dining room walls, or Sinatra crooning over its sound system. Whatever the reason, Tony's Diner reminds me of dining in an Atlantic City hotel. First a note on the restaurant's exterior: It is cool. At night, seven pillars of colored lights wash the upper reaches of the restaurant's front. The lights slowly change colors. This brightens a stretch of Park Avenue just north of 1st Mariner Arena and blends in nicely with the neon glow of a sign reading "Tony's Diner."
BUSINESS
By Anne Kenderdine and Anne Kenderdine,The Washington Post | May 17, 2009
Real estate agents, home stagers and decorators strongly recommend painting a home in neutral colors to help it sell faster. Why? "Today's buyer doesn't want any work," says home stager Carol Buckalew of Frederick. You don't want buyers to walk into a house and immediately think about the extra costs of repainting because they have a strong reaction to a color, she says. Neutral colors also help a property look best in photographs online, says Long & Foster real estate agent Deb Gorham.
NEWS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2008
This is the time of year pumpkins take center stage. But if there were a Robin to the pumpkin's Batman, it would certainly be the gourd. Gourds are as much a part of autumn as their big orange cousin. And, in some cases, even more so because gourds are often displayed well into November, long after pumpkins have become pie. Gourds come in bright colors, some sporting warts, stripes, bi-colors and even wings. But these welcome decorations are only part of the picture. Gourds are also used as spoons, bowls, musical instruments, art, dolls and sponges.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Sun | March 16, 2007
Many of Judy Templeton's friends call her Columbia townhouse "the whimsical wonderland." She is pleased with the compliment. "This is my little-girl playhouse," said the holistic health counselor who also teaches musical theater and dance. "My home is an amalgam of everything that makes me happy." Ironically, the year in which it was planned followed one of the most difficult periods of her life. Templeton's husband died unexpectedly while out of town on a golfing trip. That was almost three years ago. At the time, the couple shared a villa-style townhouse on a golf course in Howard County.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | February 15, 2007
Austin Grill This Tex-Mex restaurant in Canton has colorful decor and live music regularly. Where -- The Can Company, 2400 Boston St. Call -- 410-534-0606 Web site -- austingrill.com Notable -- The late-night happy hour, which runs from 10 p.m. to close every day and includes buy-one-get-one-free margaritas, $2 drafts and food specials. Vibe -- Fun. The walls are painted in bright colors and covered in random decorations. Crowd -- Older during the day and usually younger at night.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | February 15, 2007
Austin Grill This Tex-Mex restaurant in Canton has colorful decor and live music regularly. Where -- The Can Company, 2400 Boston St. Call -- 410-534-0606 Web site -- austingrill.com Notable -- The late-night happy hour, which runs from 10 p.m. to close every day and includes buy-one-get-one-free margaritas, $2 drafts and food specials. Vibe -- Fun. The walls are painted in bright colors and covered in random decorations. Crowd -- Older during the day and usually younger at night.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gaile Robinson and Gaile Robinson,Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 22, 1999
Apple dropped the tutti-frutti bomb a year ago when iMac computers were deployed encased in transparent skins of blueberry, strawberry, grape, tangerine and lime.Instantly, life as we know it changed.The fallout from the sale of more than 2 million colorful iMacs realigned target customers, diverted the product design palette to preschool color preferences and cloaked spiritual issues in a colorful shroud of commercial exploitation.Sounds like a lot to pin on the chromatic difference between tan and tangerine, but there it is.The happy-color bomb, designed in Northern California Apple labs, targets the most desirable customer -- the trend-setting generations younger than the baby boomers, known as Gen X, Gen Y and the echo boomers.
FEATURES
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | May 3, 2006
German troops may have been marching outside his studio door in Nice in the summer of 1943, but the late works of French artist Henri Matisse (1869-1954) nonetheless shine with a joyful celebration of life. That's the optimistic message of Jazz, an artist book of 20 stencil prints on the theme of the circus that Matisse created from cut-paper collages during the final creative period of his life. Now that work, one of the most influential artist books of the 20th century, is the centerpiece of a lovely one-gallery exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Matisse: Jazz runs through Aug. 27 at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive.
NEWS
By ERICKA BLOUNT DANOIS and ERICKA BLOUNT DANOIS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 2, 2006
Baltimore designers have an eye for fashion -- including what's hot and what's not for men's fashion in Charm City. Here, a few weigh in with their projections of what men can expect to wear this spring. DERMAINE JOHNSON, 33 For spring, Johnson will be introducing a high-end premium denim line and a men's Madison Walker logo for polo shirts, T-shirts and pants. "My men's line consists of classics with a twist," says Johnson (left), who has been designing for the past 10 years and divides his time among Baltimore, New York and occasionally London.
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