Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBrigadier General
IN THE NEWS

Brigadier General

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | April 25, 1994
Dorothy B. Pocklington thought she was signing up for a two-year stint in the Army when she quit her job teaching nursing at the University of Southwestern Louisiana.Thirty years later, the 60-year-old Howard County resident has retired from the Army Reserve as the organization's first female brigadier general."I was thrilled to be a general officer (GO)," said General Pocklington, who has lived in Ellicott City for 17 years. "It was wonderful."Last month, the nurse marked the culmination of her 30-year Army career with a retirement at the Pentagon where she received the prestigious Distinguished Service Medal, the Army's highest medal for a noncombat role.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 20, 2014
Brigadier General Bruce T. Crawford officially assumed command of the Army Communications-Electronics Command and of Aberdeen Proving Ground on Tuesday during a 10 a.m. ceremony at the post's C4ISR Center of Excellence Campus. Gen. Dennis L. Via, commanding general of the Army Materiel Command, presided over the ceremony and welcomed Crawford to the AMC family. Both generals greeted the more than 400 soldiers, dignitaries, employees and assembled guests. "Brig. Gen. Crawford knows communications, he knows the warfighter and he is well respected within the Army's Signal community and the Joint C4 [command, control, communications, computers]
Advertisement
NEWS
May 25, 2005
William Seawell, 87, a former brigadier general who served as commandant of cadets at the Air Force Academy and later as president and chairman of now-defunct Pan American World Airways, died Friday in Pine Bluff, Ark. After serving with the Army Air Forces in World War II, General Seawell held numerous military positions, including military assistant to the secretary of the Air Force and military assistant to the deputy secretary of defense. A West Point graduate, he was named commandant of cadets at the Air Force Academy in 1961 and attained the rank of brigadier general just before he retired in 1963.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | October 7, 2006
Jack D. Kaufman, a retired Maryland National Guard brigadier general who had headed the Maryland Military Academy and was former state Selective Service director, died of heart failure Tuesday at Northwest Hospital Center. The longtime Pikesville resident was 86. General Kaufman, who was born and raised in Baltimore, was the son of Morris Kaufman, who had served with the 110th Field Artillery in Europe during World War I. He was a 1937 graduate of City College and enlisted in the Maryland National Guard's 110th Field Artillery, 29th Division, in 1940.
NEWS
January 3, 2003
WASHINGTON - Marine Col. John R. Allen, who a year ago was named to the highest position ever held by a Marine at the Naval Academy, has been nominated by President Bush to become a brigadier general, Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld announced yesterday. Allen, 49, the Naval Academy's commandant of midshipmen, must be confirmed by the U.S. Senate, a Department of Defense spokeswoman said. He is a 1976 academy graduate and career officer. "There are many outstanding colonels in the Marine Corps today who would make superb general officers," Allen said in a statement released yesterday, "so to be selected is truly a humbling experience."
NEWS
July 12, 1997
Charles L. Drake,72, a geologist who theorized that volcanoes led to the extinction of dinosaurs, died after a heart attack Tuesday in Norwich, Vt.He was a leading advocate for the argument that volcanic eruptions in India spewed lava over 200,000 square miles, releasing chlorine, sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide that led to the dinosaurs' demise.A now widely accepted compromise theory suggests that a meteorite hit Earth and caused the extinctions.Godfrey McHugh,85, a retired brigadier general who served as an Air Force aide to President John F. Kennedy, died July 5 in Palm Beach, Fla., of cardiac arrest.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2005
John Franklin Burk Jr., a retired brigadier general and advertising executive who was a past chairman of the state's World War II memorial at Annapolis, died of heart and kidney failure Friday at the Department of Veterans Affairs nursing home in Northwood. The Timonium resident was 87. Born in Baltimore and raised in Long Green in Baltimore County, he was a 1935 graduate of Towson High School. Drafted into the Army in 1941, he rose during World War II to the rank of captain and earned the Combat Infantry Badge, three Bronze Stars and three battle stars for his service in the Battle of the Bulge, the Rhineland and in Central Europe.
NEWS
By Tiffany Vallo and Tiffany Vallo,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2005
It was about midday on July 1, 1863, that Brig. Gen. Alexander Schimmelfennig's 1st Brigade of the 11th Corps' 3rd Division arrived at Gettysburg, Pa. Shortly after his brigade's arrival, however, there was a flank attack and stampede of the 11th Corps through Gettysburg, the men seeking refuge on Cemetery Hill. Injured by a shell concussion and probably very confused, Schimmelfennig sought shelter from pursuing Confederates in a pigsty behind a house on Baltimore Street, according to John Heiser, a ranger and historian at Gettysburg National Military Park.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 25, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Autopsy reports on 44 prisoners who died in U.S. custody in Iraq and Afghanistan indicate that 21 were the victims of homicide, including eight who appear to have been fatally abused by their captors, the American Civil Liberties Union reported yesterday. Detainees were smothered, beaten or exposed to the elements, sometimes during interrogations. Many of these cases had been brought to light previously but now have been confirmed through autopsies; some of the deaths followed abusive interrogations by elite Navy SEALs, military intelligence and the CIA, the ACLU said.
NEWS
July 11, 2006
On July 4, 2006, GEORGIANNA H. PRICE of Columbia, MD. Mrs. Price is survived by her mother, Mrs. Anna De Costa Hunter, her husband of 51 years, Brigadier General (Ret) George B. Price, four children and their spouses and families, Katherine and Benny Dukes, James and Donna Price, William and Soney Price, Robert and Barbara Price and her brother George W. Hunter, Jr. along with 12 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. A Wake will be held at the Witzke Funeral Home, 5555 Twin Knolls Rd. in Columbia, MD on Thursday, July 13, 2006 from 3 to 5 P.M. and 7 to 9 P.M. Her funeral service will be held at the Post Chapel at Ft. Meyer, VA on Friday, July 14, 2006 at 10 A.M. with interment to be held immediately afterwards in Arlington National Cemetery.
NEWS
July 11, 2006
On July 4, 2006, GEORGIANNA H. PRICE of Columbia, MD. Mrs. Price is survived by her mother, Mrs. Anna De Costa Hunter, her husband of 51 years, Brigadier General (Ret) George B. Price, four children and their spouses and families, Katherine and Benny Dukes, James and Donna Price, William and Soney Price, Robert and Barbara Price and her brother George W. Hunter, Jr. along with 12 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. A Wake will be held at the Witzke Funeral Home, 5555 Twin Knolls Rd. in Columbia, MD on Thursday, July 13, 2006 from 3 to 5 P.M. and 7 to 9 P.M. Her funeral service will be held at the Post Chapel at Ft. Meyer, VA on Friday, July 14, 2006 at 10 A.M. with interment to be held immediately afterwards in Arlington National Cemetery.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 25, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Autopsy reports on 44 prisoners who died in U.S. custody in Iraq and Afghanistan indicate that 21 were the victims of homicide, including eight who appear to have been fatally abused by their captors, the American Civil Liberties Union reported yesterday. Detainees were smothered, beaten or exposed to the elements, sometimes during interrogations. Many of these cases had been brought to light previously but now have been confirmed through autopsies; some of the deaths followed abusive interrogations by elite Navy SEALs, military intelligence and the CIA, the ACLU said.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2005
John Franklin Burk Jr., a retired brigadier general and advertising executive who was a past chairman of the state's World War II memorial at Annapolis, died of heart and kidney failure Friday at the Department of Veterans Affairs nursing home in Northwood. The Timonium resident was 87. Born in Baltimore and raised in Long Green in Baltimore County, he was a 1935 graduate of Towson High School. Drafted into the Army in 1941, he rose during World War II to the rank of captain and earned the Combat Infantry Badge, three Bronze Stars and three battle stars for his service in the Battle of the Bulge, the Rhineland and in Central Europe.
NEWS
By Tiffany Vallo and Tiffany Vallo,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2005
It was about midday on July 1, 1863, that Brig. Gen. Alexander Schimmelfennig's 1st Brigade of the 11th Corps' 3rd Division arrived at Gettysburg, Pa. Shortly after his brigade's arrival, however, there was a flank attack and stampede of the 11th Corps through Gettysburg, the men seeking refuge on Cemetery Hill. Injured by a shell concussion and probably very confused, Schimmelfennig sought shelter from pursuing Confederates in a pigsty behind a house on Baltimore Street, according to John Heiser, a ranger and historian at Gettysburg National Military Park.
NEWS
May 25, 2005
William Seawell, 87, a former brigadier general who served as commandant of cadets at the Air Force Academy and later as president and chairman of now-defunct Pan American World Airways, died Friday in Pine Bluff, Ark. After serving with the Army Air Forces in World War II, General Seawell held numerous military positions, including military assistant to the secretary of the Air Force and military assistant to the deputy secretary of defense. A West Point graduate, he was named commandant of cadets at the Air Force Academy in 1961 and attained the rank of brigadier general just before he retired in 1963.
TRAVEL
By Jerry V. Haines and Jerry V. Haines,Special to the Sun | February 20, 2005
There's a monument at the corner of Washington Avenue and Pitt Street in Fredericksburg, Va., engraved to proclaim that the woman buried below it is "Mary, the Mother of Washington." It sounds almost biblical, consistent with the high regard many people had for George Washington and his family. (Lots of people disliked him, too; they just didn't make statements in marble about it.) But to me what's attractive about Fredericksburg is the opportunity it gives us to sweep away the legendary stuff -- good or bad -- and see the day-to-day realities of Washington's life and the lives of people of his time.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | March 6, 1994
About 1,500 people gathered last night amid pomp andpageantry for the Maryland National Guard's military ball marking the 50th anniversary of the D-Day invasion in World War II and the promotion of the guard's first black brigadier general.Maj. Gen. James F. Frettered, the guard's adjutant general, also used the occasion of the 22nd annual ball at Baltimore's Fifth Regiment Army to officially announce that 200 Maryland National Guard volunteers will embark on an 11-month peacekeeping mission in the Middle East.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | October 7, 2006
Jack D. Kaufman, a retired Maryland National Guard brigadier general who had headed the Maryland Military Academy and was former state Selective Service director, died of heart failure Tuesday at Northwest Hospital Center. The longtime Pikesville resident was 86. General Kaufman, who was born and raised in Baltimore, was the son of Morris Kaufman, who had served with the 110th Field Artillery in Europe during World War I. He was a 1937 graduate of City College and enlisted in the Maryland National Guard's 110th Field Artillery, 29th Division, in 1940.
NEWS
January 3, 2003
WASHINGTON - Marine Col. John R. Allen, who a year ago was named to the highest position ever held by a Marine at the Naval Academy, has been nominated by President Bush to become a brigadier general, Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld announced yesterday. Allen, 49, the Naval Academy's commandant of midshipmen, must be confirmed by the U.S. Senate, a Department of Defense spokeswoman said. He is a 1976 academy graduate and career officer. "There are many outstanding colonels in the Marine Corps today who would make superb general officers," Allen said in a statement released yesterday, "so to be selected is truly a humbling experience."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2001
Brig. Gen. George Morris Brooks, the first African-American colonel in the history of the Maryland National Guard, who also served in World War II and Korea, died Tuesday of cancer at Maryland General Hospital. He was 77 and lived in West Baltimore. General Brooks enlisted as a private in the Army in 1943, and served with the infantry in Europe and the Pacific. In 1946, he was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Maryland National Guard's 231st Transportation Truck Battalion. The battalion traces its history to the First Separate Company (Monumental City Guards)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.