Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBridget Fonda
IN THE NEWS

Bridget Fonda

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Carrie Rickey and Carrie Rickey,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 20, 1997
A new-age spiritual quest in the guise of an old film noir, the romantic thriller "Rough Magic" stars that enchantress Bridget Fonda as a sorcerer's apprentice who discovers she possesses true supernatural powers.If you like your magic realism hard-boiled, your spiritualism screwball or Fonda any way you can get her (and she is irresistible here), the awkwardly made fairy tale is appealing.But it is hard to imagine a stranger brew than Clare Peploe's love potion of a film set in 1950. This is a movie that is equal parts Lewis Carroll and Carlos Castaneda and as uneven as it is potent.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
December 30, 2005
Bridget Fonda (above) plays a scientist who is in over her head trying to stop a huge killer crocodile in Lake Placid (9 p.m.-11 p.m., A&E).
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 6, 2001
Fans of old Hollywood movies live in hope - and usually in vain - for a male-female team with the oomph and durability of Hepburn and Tracy or O'Hara and Wayne. Since most films these days are designed as single-star vehicles, the balance typically isn't there and the possibilities elicit boredom or derision. This spring, the romantic hit of the season was "Bridget Jones's Diary," a showcase for Renee Zellweger with Hugh Grant and Colin Firth in supporting roles. Occasionally you get a Richard Gere willing to step back and showcase a Julia Roberts ("Pretty Woman," "Runaway Bride")
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 6, 2001
Fans of old Hollywood movies live in hope - and usually in vain - for a male-female team with the oomph and durability of Hepburn and Tracy or O'Hara and Wayne. Since most films these days are designed as single-star vehicles, the balance typically isn't there and the possibilities elicit boredom or derision. This spring, the romantic hit of the season was "Bridget Jones's Diary," a showcase for Renee Zellweger with Hugh Grant and Colin Firth in supporting roles. Occasionally you get a Richard Gere willing to step back and showcase a Julia Roberts ("Pretty Woman," "Runaway Bride")
FEATURES
December 30, 2005
Bridget Fonda (above) plays a scientist who is in over her head trying to stop a huge killer crocodile in Lake Placid (9 p.m.-11 p.m., A&E).
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | March 28, 1991
''Past Midnight,'' shooting in Seattle, stars Rutger Hauer and Natasha Richardson in a psychological thriller about a social worker who befriends a client convicted of a heinous murder. Also shooting in Seattle is ''Singles'' for Warner Bros. Cameron Crowe follows "Say Anything" with this romantic comedy that looks at a group of young folks who alternately search for and run from that thing called love. Bridget Fonda, Campbell Scott, Kyra Sedgwick, Shella Kelly, Matt Dillon and Bill Pullman are in the cast.
FEATURES
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2001
Did you ever have such a bad dream that you feel relieved that the details are lost in the fuzz of waking up? "Monkeybone" has the same effect. Brendan Fraser is Stu Miley, whose Monkeybone loony-toon is on the verge of becoming the next big thing in the animation industry. Plagued by nightmares until he's treated by Bridget Fonda's earnest doctor Julie McElroy, Stu channels his repressed bad boy tendencies into his simian sidekick. An accident sends Stu into Downtown, a kind of purgatory where souls await their fate.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 20, 1993
"Point of No Return" isn't a remake so much as a tracing of another movie, Luc Besson's original "La Femme Nikita" of just three years ago. So in a certain respect it feels dead; it has glitz, glamour and pizazz but no personality or spontaneity; it feels as if it were directed by a robot. Whatever it represented to Besson, I'll tell you what it represented to John Badham: a paycheck.Still . . . it kind of packs a punch. OK, I watched, I rooted, I enjoyed and, toward the end, I was involutarily pulling the trigger along with our heroine.
FEATURES
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1999
A 30-foot crocodile?A flying cow?A Golden Girl who curses like a "South Park" kid on crack?Who writes stuff like this, anyway? David E. Kelley, of course.No longer content to write some of the quirkiest material on television, Kelley has loosed his fateful pen on the screenplay of "Lake Placid," a thriller that is not quite as thrilling as it could be or as clever as it thinks it is.Don't misunderstand. "Lake Placid" has its share of terrifying moments. And Kelley is too accomplished a writer not to produce snappy dialogue from time to time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | August 2, 1991
Among the noisome offerings that the film studios typically send our way in August, "Doc Hollywood" should be one of the least offensive. This modest feature could have been a made-for-TV movie: It has a cast that includes several TV stars and there are more than a few jokes aimed at that medium's audience.Michael J. Fox plays a young surgeon named Ben Stone. On his way to Los Angeles, where he plans to make his fame and fortune as a plastic surgeon to the stars, he ends up stranded in a little South Carolina town named Grady.
FEATURES
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2001
Did you ever have such a bad dream that you feel relieved that the details are lost in the fuzz of waking up? "Monkeybone" has the same effect. Brendan Fraser is Stu Miley, whose Monkeybone loony-toon is on the verge of becoming the next big thing in the animation industry. Plagued by nightmares until he's treated by Bridget Fonda's earnest doctor Julie McElroy, Stu channels his repressed bad boy tendencies into his simian sidekick. An accident sends Stu into Downtown, a kind of purgatory where souls await their fate.
FEATURES
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1999
A 30-foot crocodile?A flying cow?A Golden Girl who curses like a "South Park" kid on crack?Who writes stuff like this, anyway? David E. Kelley, of course.No longer content to write some of the quirkiest material on television, Kelley has loosed his fateful pen on the screenplay of "Lake Placid," a thriller that is not quite as thrilling as it could be or as clever as it thinks it is.Don't misunderstand. "Lake Placid" has its share of terrifying moments. And Kelley is too accomplished a writer not to produce snappy dialogue from time to time.
FEATURES
By Carrie Rickey and Carrie Rickey,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 20, 1997
A new-age spiritual quest in the guise of an old film noir, the romantic thriller "Rough Magic" stars that enchantress Bridget Fonda as a sorcerer's apprentice who discovers she possesses true supernatural powers.If you like your magic realism hard-boiled, your spiritualism screwball or Fonda any way you can get her (and she is irresistible here), the awkwardly made fairy tale is appealing.But it is hard to imagine a stranger brew than Clare Peploe's love potion of a film set in 1950. This is a movie that is equal parts Lewis Carroll and Carlos Castaneda and as uneven as it is potent.
FEATURES
By Chris Vognar and Chris Vognar,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | April 19, 1997
The terms "cable movie" and "minimalist filmmaking" aren't often used together in the same sentence.But most cable movies don't possess the quiet polish and power of "In the Gloaming," Christopher Reeve's directorial debut, which airs tomorrow on HBO."In the Gloaming" has been much publicized as the return of former Superman Reeve, paralyzed from the neck down in an equestrian accident two years ago. While Reeve's bravery certainly makes for a moving sidelight, the film itself has folks buzzing about his promise behind the camera.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 14, 1997
Zany, wacky, goofy and even pretty darn nutty, here comes "Touch," which refers not to low-impact football but to the finger of the Almighty.Derived from an Elmore Leonard novel by Paul ("Taxi Driver") Schrader and starring Christopher Walken, the movie carries with it expectations that everybody is only too happy to smash to pieces. No, darn it, it's not a sleazy, violent, tensely plotted, quirky tale of small-beer crooks and cops, as one might expect from the magic teaming of the Leonard, Schrader and Walken sensibilities.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1995
The previews you are about to read are true. The names have not been changed, since there are no innocent. On Dec. 29, "Dragnet" is pulled off the Nick-at-Nite schedule. In a few paragraphs, the results of that decision.* "Great Performances" (9:30 p.m.-11 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- Hear the works of the man who is possibly America's greatest living Broadway lyricist, as Betty Buckley, Glenn Close, Bill Irwin, Madeline Kahn and others join together for "Sondheim: A Celebration at Carnegie Hall."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 14, 1997
Zany, wacky, goofy and even pretty darn nutty, here comes "Touch," which refers not to low-impact football but to the finger of the Almighty.Derived from an Elmore Leonard novel by Paul ("Taxi Driver") Schrader and starring Christopher Walken, the movie carries with it expectations that everybody is only too happy to smash to pieces. No, darn it, it's not a sleazy, violent, tensely plotted, quirky tale of small-beer crooks and cops, as one might expect from the magic teaming of the Leonard, Schrader and Walken sensibilities.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1995
The previews you are about to read are true. The names have not been changed, since there are no innocent. On Dec. 29, "Dragnet" is pulled off the Nick-at-Nite schedule. In a few paragraphs, the results of that decision.* "Great Performances" (9:30 p.m.-11 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- Hear the works of the man who is possibly America's greatest living Broadway lyricist, as Betty Buckley, Glenn Close, Bill Irwin, Madeline Kahn and others join together for "Sondheim: A Celebration at Carnegie Hall."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 20, 1993
"Point of No Return" isn't a remake so much as a tracing of another movie, Luc Besson's original "La Femme Nikita" of just three years ago. So in a certain respect it feels dead; it has glitz, glamour and pizazz but no personality or spontaneity; it feels as if it were directed by a robot. Whatever it represented to Besson, I'll tell you what it represented to John Badham: a paycheck.Still . . . it kind of packs a punch. OK, I watched, I rooted, I enjoyed and, toward the end, I was involutarily pulling the trigger along with our heroine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | August 2, 1991
Among the noisome offerings that the film studios typically send our way in August, "Doc Hollywood" should be one of the least offensive. This modest feature could have been a made-for-TV movie: It has a cast that includes several TV stars and there are more than a few jokes aimed at that medium's audience.Michael J. Fox plays a young surgeon named Ben Stone. On his way to Los Angeles, where he plans to make his fame and fortune as a plastic surgeon to the stars, he ends up stranded in a little South Carolina town named Grady.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.