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NEWS
By Lorraine Gingerich and Lorraine Gingerich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 21, 2000
Bertucci's advertises itself as a "brick oven pizzeria," but it serves much more than pizza. The menu includes a variety of appetizers and main course dinners. High ceilings and spaciousness greet you as you enter the restaurant. There is a mix of booths and tables, with the kitchen open and visible to the guests. The large brick oven, which cooks pizza and other dishes, sits beside the kitchen. "The brick oven is fashioned after the ones used in Italy," said Ken Jednachowski, the general manger.
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NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | September 20, 2009
Think of it as Woodberry Kitchen, the Inner Harbor Edition. Of course, no restaurant wants to be known as a clone of another restaurant, and this one isn't; but the new B&O American Brasserie ought to take the comparison as a compliment. Woodberry Kitchen is one of our few success stories in the past couple of years. The B&O American Brasserie is the restaurant adjacent to the Hotel Monaco Baltimore. It's a handsome, contemporary space on two levels, with a mezzanine overlooking the bar and exhibition kitchen.
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NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2000
Ricciuti's Brick Oven Pizza isn't just for pizza lovers anymore. In the four years since the restaurant opened in Hickory Ridge Village Center, Ricciuti's has expanded its menu to include gazpacho, grilled salmon, spinach lasagna and other Italian dishes. "Pizza is only one-third of our sales," said James Ricciuti, who owns the Columbia restaurant with his wife, Amy, and partner Adam Harman. True, when you come into the cheery restaurant with its warm yellow walls and forest-green trim your eye is drawn to the fiery glow of the pizza oven behind the counter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2009
There was another brick-oven pizza joint on the same corner spot in Little Italy where Isabella's is now. That place was good, but Isabella's, open now for 2 1/2 years, is better. I'm sorry I hadn't made it there sooner. The truth is that there's a good range of eating choices in Little Italy, from unpretentious family fare to high cuisine, and Isabella's occupies its own niche. Isabella's is the kind of order-at-the-counter joint you'd drop into a couple of times a week to order a pizza or a good sandwich.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | September 4, 2007
Heat from a pizzeria's brick oven sparked the fire that destroyed two buildings and severely damaged another in a reviving stretch of downtown Mount Airy, the state fire marshal's office said yesterday. The extent of the destruction may have been worsened by the positioning of electric lines on Main Street, which forced fire trucks to wait while a crew from Allegheny Power came and disconnected the wires. Deputy Fire Marshal W. Faron Taylor said the fire started early Sunday in Laurienzo's Brick Oven Cafe at 200 S. Main St. Although the oven was vented, enough heat escaped into the walls of the 1924 building to ignite the frame construction, Taylor said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2009
There was another brick-oven pizza joint on the same corner spot in Little Italy where Isabella's is now. That place was good, but Isabella's, open now for 2 1/2 years, is better. I'm sorry I hadn't made it there sooner. The truth is that there's a good range of eating choices in Little Italy, from unpretentious family fare to high cuisine, and Isabella's occupies its own niche. Isabella's is the kind of order-at-the-counter joint you'd drop into a couple of times a week to order a pizza or a good sandwich.
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2000
To Claudie Lefilliatre, the smell of bread baking is so familiar that she can sense if a loaf has the right mix of ingredients just by the aroma seeping from the oven. She was raised on that smell, working at her father's bakery in France as a child and later in her own Paris bakery. About three years ago, Lefilliatre and her husband, Pierre, brought the well-known scent to the United States. The couple owns Bonaparte, a French bakery with stores in Fells Point and Howard County's Historic Savage Mill.
FEATURES
By KAROL V. MENZIE | January 2, 1994
Donna's Restaurant, 800 N. Charles St. (410) 539-8051. All major credit cards. Open for lunch 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mondays to Fridays; for dinner 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Sundays to Thursdays and 5:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. No-smoking area: yes. Wheelchair-accessible: no. Prices: appetizers, $3.95-$6.95; entrees, $10.95-$15.95.Most people would rest on their laurels after opening a pair of wildly successful coffee bar-cafes within a year or so, but restaurateur Donna Crivello has never been one to abandon challenge.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | April 2, 2000
I wouldn't be reviewing Bistro Sensations, Towson Town Center's newest eating place, if I didn't think it's an example of the restaurant of the future. You'll find the half-market, half-cafe on the mall's lowest level where the Garden Cafe used to be. Its bright neon sign is softened by a warm yellow-and-blue color scheme, hand-painted murals, decorative tile and a fire glowing in the brick pizza oven. The staff is attentive, friendly and eager to please (although that may not be true when they get swamped; things were slow the evening we were there)
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1998
Reading the dirt for signs of Baltimore seamstress Mary Pickersgill's "beehive" brick oven yesterday, archaeologist Esther Doyle Read pointed to a mix of black and yellow soil and drew a very important line.Tracing the long-vanished oven's outline was the discovery she and a six-member team had worked for during their 10-day excavation of part of the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House grounds. They reached the object of their quest on the seventh day: the foundation of the oven the Pickersgill household used when it lived in the two-story federal brick house on East Pratt Street from 1807 to 1857.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | September 4, 2007
Heat from a pizzeria's brick oven sparked the fire that destroyed two buildings and severely damaged another in a reviving stretch of downtown Mount Airy, the state fire marshal's office said yesterday. The extent of the destruction may have been worsened by the positioning of electric lines on Main Street, which forced fire trucks to wait while a crew from Allegheny Power came and disconnected the wires. Deputy Fire Marshal W. Faron Taylor said the fire started early Sunday in Laurienzo's Brick Oven Cafe at 200 S. Main St. Although the oven was vented, enough heat escaped into the walls of the 1924 building to ignite the frame construction, Taylor said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 29, 2004
Rapidly gentrifying Belvedere Square is becoming an important destination for area foodies. A year ago, the vastly improved Belvedere Square Market opened, with vendors selling smoked meats, sushi and fresh soups. The shopping center across from the Senator Theatre on York Road now boasts the Grand Cru wine bar and an Irish pub called Ryan's Daughter, as well as other chic stores. Egyptian Pizza, which has been in the square since 1990, is one of the few survivors from the square's less upscale days.
NEWS
By Jody Vilschick and Jody Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 12, 2001
As its name implies, pizza is Bella Mia Pizza's stock in trade. "Large cheese pizzas are probably our most popular item," says Ali Shenas, the restaurant's owner. Shenas is proud of his brick oven pizzas. "It definitely gives them a special flavor," he says. "That flavor comes from the way it's made. Like in old-fashioned Italian restaurants, we make the pizza crust onto wood boards and then transfer them onto slabs of hot brick in our wood-burning oven." The high temperature of the bricks - from 500 to 600 degrees Fahrenheit - gives the pizzas their crispy crust.
NEWS
By Lorraine Gingerich and Lorraine Gingerich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 21, 2000
Bertucci's advertises itself as a "brick oven pizzeria," but it serves much more than pizza. The menu includes a variety of appetizers and main course dinners. High ceilings and spaciousness greet you as you enter the restaurant. There is a mix of booths and tables, with the kitchen open and visible to the guests. The large brick oven, which cooks pizza and other dishes, sits beside the kitchen. "The brick oven is fashioned after the ones used in Italy," said Ken Jednachowski, the general manger.
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2000
To Claudie Lefilliatre, the smell of bread baking is so familiar that she can sense if a loaf has the right mix of ingredients just by the aroma seeping from the oven. She was raised on that smell, working at her father's bakery in France as a child and later in her own Paris bakery. About three years ago, Lefilliatre and her husband, Pierre, brought the well-known scent to the United States. The couple owns Bonaparte, a French bakery with stores in Fells Point and Howard County's Historic Savage Mill.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2000
Ricciuti's Brick Oven Pizza isn't just for pizza lovers anymore. In the four years since the restaurant opened in Hickory Ridge Village Center, Ricciuti's has expanded its menu to include gazpacho, grilled salmon, spinach lasagna and other Italian dishes. "Pizza is only one-third of our sales," said James Ricciuti, who owns the Columbia restaurant with his wife, Amy, and partner Adam Harman. True, when you come into the cheery restaurant with its warm yellow walls and forest-green trim your eye is drawn to the fiery glow of the pizza oven behind the counter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 29, 2004
Rapidly gentrifying Belvedere Square is becoming an important destination for area foodies. A year ago, the vastly improved Belvedere Square Market opened, with vendors selling smoked meats, sushi and fresh soups. The shopping center across from the Senator Theatre on York Road now boasts the Grand Cru wine bar and an Irish pub called Ryan's Daughter, as well as other chic stores. Egyptian Pizza, which has been in the square since 1990, is one of the few survivors from the square's less upscale days.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | September 20, 2009
Think of it as Woodberry Kitchen, the Inner Harbor Edition. Of course, no restaurant wants to be known as a clone of another restaurant, and this one isn't; but the new B&O American Brasserie ought to take the comparison as a compliment. Woodberry Kitchen is one of our few success stories in the past couple of years. The B&O American Brasserie is the restaurant adjacent to the Hotel Monaco Baltimore. It's a handsome, contemporary space on two levels, with a mezzanine overlooking the bar and exhibition kitchen.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | April 2, 2000
I wouldn't be reviewing Bistro Sensations, Towson Town Center's newest eating place, if I didn't think it's an example of the restaurant of the future. You'll find the half-market, half-cafe on the mall's lowest level where the Garden Cafe used to be. Its bright neon sign is softened by a warm yellow-and-blue color scheme, hand-painted murals, decorative tile and a fire glowing in the brick pizza oven. The staff is attentive, friendly and eager to please (although that may not be true when they get swamped; things were slow the evening we were there)
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1998
Reading the dirt for signs of Baltimore seamstress Mary Pickersgill's "beehive" brick oven yesterday, archaeologist Esther Doyle Read pointed to a mix of black and yellow soil and drew a very important line.Tracing the long-vanished oven's outline was the discovery she and a six-member team had worked for during their 10-day excavation of part of the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House grounds. They reached the object of their quest on the seventh day: the foundation of the oven the Pickersgill household used when it lived in the two-story federal brick house on East Pratt Street from 1807 to 1857.
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