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Brick By Brick

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NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2000
Imagine Memorial Stadium imploding in a flash storm of dust. The stadium on East 33rd Street, which the Orioles and Ravens left in the 1990s after stadiums were built downtown, could be demolished as early as November, a city task force learned this week. No demolition bids have been received. City and state officials are considering two ways of taking down the stadium, which was built in 1954: implosion or brick by brick. "Implosion is more likely, but at this point we need to preserve our options," said Edward Cline, deputy director of the Maryland Stadium Authority, the state agency managing the survey, preparation and demolition.
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NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2010
Yes, Lego makes trains. And no, there's no telling how many thousands of bricks went into the making of this particular train garden. Abe Friedman smiles as he recounts the most frequent questions he's hearing this weekend at the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Museum, where an amazingly intricate and wondrously expansive Lego creation is kicking-off this season's Holiday Festival of Trains. Each weekend through the holiday season, different model railroading clubs will be setting up train gardens in the museum's roundhouse.
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FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2005
He doesn't much look like it now, at 85, what with the thinning hair, stooped shoulders and sweat pants hitched up nearly chest-high beneath his British prep school blazer. And, safari suit notwithstanding, Basil Saffer didn't much look like it then, either: bespectacled, slight Englishman that he was, three cameras dangling from his neck as he roamed ancient lands in a 20-year quest for treasure - or at least what he viewed as such. "The Indiana Jones of Brick" they called him, and some still do - a testament not to Harrison Ford-like looks, not to particularly swashbuckling adventures, but to Saffer's determined and meticulous efforts to research, seek out, obtain and preserve ancient brick.
NEWS
By RICHARD C. PADDOCK and RICHARD C. PADDOCK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 29, 2006
BAWURAN, Indonesia -- His village is a huge pile of rubble today, and for Sopo Nyono the reason seems simple: bricks without mortar. For years, people in this part of Java built their houses by piling bricks on top of each other with only layers of dirt between them. There was no mortar or reinforcing bars, just a coating of cement to keep the stack from toppling over. When a 6.3-magnitude earthquake struck central Java on Saturday, hundreds, perhaps thousands, of these buildings turned into tombs.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1996
He lives off Ritchie Highway in Pasadena, past the McDonald's that has ditched drive-through intercoms for a "Face to Face" window service that takes all the joy out of screaming garbled orders back and forth at each other. He is Stan Gembicki, the brick man of Pasadena, and he is out back of his home on G Street.Stan extends his tanned tough hand, jacks up his jeans and wonders out loud why the heck anyone would want to see his brick work. And why the heck did his wife, Edith, write the Sunpapers about it."
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,Sun Staff Writer | July 18, 1995
The owners of historic Samuel Owings House want to move the 18th-century building to a new site in Reisterstown, where it would be restored and returned to its original use -- as a private home.Built as the home of Samuel Owings II, for whom Owings Mills was named, the house is occupied by a restaurant and flower shop in a neighborhood now largely commercial.Plans call for it to be moved to a more rustic, 7-acre site near Reisterstown, in the Valley of David section off Nicodemus Road. It would be restored, and become the home of Dr. David Miller, one of the owners.
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | April 7, 1991
The world may seem awash in hotels, but a few with new wrinkles are still starting up.In Columbia, Md., the Courtyard by Marriott is rising -- not brick by brick -- but room by room.The $10 million hotel, being assembled with 152 factory-built guest rooms, will be the first steel-frame, midrise modular hotel in the United States.It went from foundation to four stories in less than three weeks, compared with at least twice that long if it were conventional construction.Marriott Corp. is trying modular construction as an experiment in saving time and money.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer | June 10, 2004
The Band: Black-Eyed Susan Hometown: Baltimore Current Members: Aaron Levy, keyboards and vocals; Adam Chase, drums; Matt Chase, guitar and vocals; David Markowitz, bass and vocals. Founded in: 1997 Style: Jam-rock Influenced by: Steely Dan, Crosby, Stills & Nash and Santana Notable: This local quartet broke into the East Coast's jam band circuit two years ago and never looked back. Since then, they've toured extensively and even shared bills with major influences, including Santana.
NEWS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2000
Demolish it, and they will come. In anticipation of the razing of Memorial Stadium later this fall, nostalgic Orioles and Colts fans began yesterday buying up bits and pieces of the place. Seats, concession-stand signs, section railings - the old ball- yard on 33rd Street was being sold off brick by brick to help fund the demolition. Literally, brick by brick: Fans could order stadium bricks for $25 apiece, available for shipment or pickup after the walls are torn down. The sale began at 10 a.m., but fans had begun queuing up at the fence beyond center field well before that.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2002
Anthony "Nino" Cricchio, who with his brother turned Caesar's Den into one of Little Italy's most popular restaurants, died Wednesday of a heart attack at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 80. The longtime Original Northwood resident was born and raised in Palermo, Sicily, the son of a ship-carpenter father and dressmaker mother. Mr. Cricchio graduated from a trade school with a degree in diesel engineering. He had served in the Italian Navy during World War II until being discharged in 1945.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2005
He doesn't much look like it now, at 85, what with the thinning hair, stooped shoulders and sweat pants hitched up nearly chest-high beneath his British prep school blazer. And, safari suit notwithstanding, Basil Saffer didn't much look like it then, either: bespectacled, slight Englishman that he was, three cameras dangling from his neck as he roamed ancient lands in a 20-year quest for treasure - or at least what he viewed as such. "The Indiana Jones of Brick" they called him, and some still do - a testament not to Harrison Ford-like looks, not to particularly swashbuckling adventures, but to Saffer's determined and meticulous efforts to research, seek out, obtain and preserve ancient brick.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer | June 10, 2004
The Band: Black-Eyed Susan Hometown: Baltimore Current Members: Aaron Levy, keyboards and vocals; Adam Chase, drums; Matt Chase, guitar and vocals; David Markowitz, bass and vocals. Founded in: 1997 Style: Jam-rock Influenced by: Steely Dan, Crosby, Stills & Nash and Santana Notable: This local quartet broke into the East Coast's jam band circuit two years ago and never looked back. Since then, they've toured extensively and even shared bills with major influences, including Santana.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith James and Meredith James,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2003
For as long as the stories that make up the Bible have been written down, their authors have been adapting them in varying ways. From the Hebrew Bible to the St. James Bible to more recent versions such as the Precious Moments Bible and the Extreme Teen Bible, the text's sacred stories have been tailored for different audiences. The oddest new addition to this genre may be The Brick Testament (Quirk Books, $14.95), 10 stories from the book of Genesis "re-sculpted" using Lego toy building bricks.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2002
Anthony "Nino" Cricchio, who with his brother turned Caesar's Den into one of Little Italy's most popular restaurants, died Wednesday of a heart attack at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 80. The longtime Original Northwood resident was born and raised in Palermo, Sicily, the son of a ship-carpenter father and dressmaker mother. Mr. Cricchio graduated from a trade school with a degree in diesel engineering. He had served in the Italian Navy during World War II until being discharged in 1945.
NEWS
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | October 7, 2001
Picture Martha Stewart in a $5,000 tufted armchair, dressed in fabric as soft as her Hermes angora-and-wool cable turtleneck. She's oh-so-comfy in her Westport, Conn., living room, with a ramekin of spicy seafood stew capped with a puff pastry beside her. She made it, of course, and you can, too, with her recipe. It's such a good thing. If it all seems too perfect, that's part of the attraction. Her magazine, Martha Stewart Living, celebrated its 10th anniversary this summer, and its loyal readers are eager for decades more of good things -- flower arrangements, luscious recipes, design tips, how-to crafts and housekeeping features.
NEWS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2000
Demolish it, and they will come. In anticipation of the razing of Memorial Stadium later this fall, nostalgic Orioles and Colts fans began yesterday buying up bits and pieces of the place. Seats, concession-stand signs, section railings - the old ball- yard on 33rd Street was being sold off brick by brick to help fund the demolition. Literally, brick by brick: Fans could order stadium bricks for $25 apiece, available for shipment or pickup after the walls are torn down. The sale began at 10 a.m., but fans had begun queuing up at the fence beyond center field well before that.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff writer | December 19, 1990
UNION BRIDGE - Two years ago, an artist searching for a studio with doors wide enough to drive a truck through found a home here.The quest for a space to sculpt and a gallery in which to show ended when Jo C. Israelson saw the old, empty fire station on East Broadway.She called the two-story brick building, built in 1884, the ideal stop in her journey as a sculptor. The station is rich in history, well-suited for her present needs and full of future possibilities.She saw herself lifting the bay doors and emptying loads of stone into a first-floor workroom, which once housed fire engines.
NEWS
By RICHARD C. PADDOCK and RICHARD C. PADDOCK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 29, 2006
BAWURAN, Indonesia -- His village is a huge pile of rubble today, and for Sopo Nyono the reason seems simple: bricks without mortar. For years, people in this part of Java built their houses by piling bricks on top of each other with only layers of dirt between them. There was no mortar or reinforcing bars, just a coating of cement to keep the stack from toppling over. When a 6.3-magnitude earthquake struck central Java on Saturday, hundreds, perhaps thousands, of these buildings turned into tombs.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2000
Imagine Memorial Stadium imploding in a flash storm of dust. The stadium on East 33rd Street, which the Orioles and Ravens left in the 1990s after stadiums were built downtown, could be demolished as early as November, a city task force learned this week. No demolition bids have been received. City and state officials are considering two ways of taking down the stadium, which was built in 1954: implosion or brick by brick. "Implosion is more likely, but at this point we need to preserve our options," said Edward Cline, deputy director of the Maryland Stadium Authority, the state agency managing the survey, preparation and demolition.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | November 26, 1999
Although Western Maryland's offense is powerful, having averaged just under 35 points per game this season, it's been that way in Westminster since Tim Keating took over as head coach in 1993.But the difference between the 17-18-3 record of Keating's first four seasons at WMC and the 31-2 record over the past three is a defense that has given up an average of less than 10 points over those past 33 games.Five seniors -- Anthony Burgos, Marvin Deal, Rob McCracken, Matt Meiklejohn and Tommy Salecky -- have played a major role in that success, the latest example coming during last Saturday's 20-16 win over Catholic in the first round of the NCAA Division III playoffs.
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