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NEWS
By P.J. Huffstutter and P.J. Huffstutter,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 7, 2006
CHICAGO -- Former Illinois Gov. George H. Ryan, a controversial politician who was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize, was sentenced yesterday to 6 1/2 years in prison for his conviction in a sweeping federal graft and corruption scandal. Before hearing U.S. District Judge Rebecca R. Pallmeyer's decision, Ryan, 72, acknowledged for the first time that he failed the public and his family and that his poor health could mean he will die behind bars. Yet as he has throughout this case, Ryan remained defiant that he was not responsible for the rampant corruption in his administration - which led to the end of a political career that spanned three decades.
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NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | July 28, 2006
A former Baltimore police officer who demanded money from a suspect in September in exchange for not appearing at the man's trial pleaded guilty to bribery yesterday but was spared jail time. Walter Jackson-Hill, 35, resigned from the force Wednesday as a condition of his plea agreement with prosecutors. His lawyer, William R. Buie III, said outside the courtroom that the officer plans to inform the department about other officers who have taken bribes. Revealing more potential corruption is not a part of Jackson-Hill's plea agreement.
NEWS
By LOUISE ROUG and LOUISE ROUG,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 13, 2006
BAGHDAD,Iraq -- The trial of Saddam Hussein saw a moment of high drama yesterday when the judge read statements from four defense witnesses recanting their testimony and swearing that the former Iraqi leader's defense team had bribed them to lie in court. Khalil Dulaimi, one of the lead defense attorneys, paid hundreds of dollars and promised lifelong salaries to the witnesses in exchange for false statements favorable to the defense, the statements said. During clandestine meetings in Syria and in Hussein's hometown of Tikrit, Dulaimi and others conspired with the witnesses, telling them what to say in court, according to the statements.
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON | June 3, 2006
A Bel Air man was sentenced yesterday to three years' supervised probation, ordered to complete 200 hours of community service and pay $10,000 in fines for his role in a bribery scheme in the Baltimore school system's maintenance department. David Joseph Clemons, 59, the owner of Polar Bear Heating and Air Conditioning Inc., pleaded guilty in Baltimore Circuit Court to bribing the former head of the school system's facilities and maintenance department, Rajiv Dixit, so that Dixit would award more contracts to Clemons' firm, according to a statement released yesterday by the state prosecutor's office.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 19, 2006
The securities class action law firm of Milberg Weiss Bershad & Schulman was charged yesterday with several criminal counts, including obstructing justice, perjury, bribery and fraud. The 20-count indictment, handed up by a federal grand jury in Los Angeles, represents the most prominent confrontation between the government and a law firm in years. While federal regulators won multimillion-dollar settlements from big corporate law firms over their role in the savings and loan scandals, no major law firm has faced a criminal indictment in recent memory.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | April 2, 2006
A Baltimore City police officer was arrested on charges that he took bribes from a suspect in return for failing to appear at the man's criminal trial, according to court records. Police charged Officer Walter Jackson-Hill, 35, with theft, bribery, extortion, obstruction of justice and other counts Friday after a six-month internal investigation revealed that he allegedly took a total of $1,150 from a man he had arrested. Jackson-Hill also agreed to try to get the suspect sentenced to probation rather than prison, according to the records.
NEWS
By TONY PERRY and TONY PERRY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 4, 2006
SAN DIEGO -- A judge rejected Randall "Duke" Cunningham's tearful bid for mercy yesterday and sentenced the war hero and disgraced former congressman to eight years and four months in federal prison for bribery. Looking thin and haggard, with head downcast, Cunningham listened as U.S. District Judge Larry A. Burns imposed the sentence. "You've undermined the opportunity [that] honest politicians have to do good," Burns said. Burns ordered Cunningham to pay $1.8 million in restitution and refused his request for a week to say goodbye to his family.
NEWS
By RALPH VARTABEDIAN and RALPH VARTABEDIAN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 12, 2006
Rep. William J. Jefferson, a Louisiana Democrat, sought bribes, jobs for his children and other favors for providing political support to a company setting up Internet service in Nigeria, according to a guilty plea entered by a former aide to the congressman yesterday in federal court in Alexandria, Va. In an alleged conspiracy that began in 2004, Jefferson, in exchange for providing political help, demanded payments and favors from a Northern Virginia company...
NEWS
By TONY PERRY and TONY PERRY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 29, 2005
SAN DIEGO -- A tearful and trembling Rep. Randy "Duke" Cunningham, a California Republican, resigned yesterday after pleading guilty to receiving $2.4 million in bribes from defense contractors and evading more than $1 million in taxes. Bribery charges involving a sitting member of Congress are relatively rare. The money involved makes Cunningham's the largest such case since several members of Congress were convicted of bribery in the early 1980s. The downfall of Cunningham, an eight-term congressman and decorated Navy fighter pilot in the Vietnam War, began with revelations about the sale of his house in Del Mar Heights to a defense contractor at an inflated price two years ago. But in a plea agreement, Cunningham admitted a pattern of bribery going back to 2000, with contractors supplying him with Persian carpets, silver candelabras, a Rolls Royce, antique furniture, travel and hotel expenses, use of a yacht and a lavish graduation party for his daughter.
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON and LYNN ANDERSON,SUN REPORTER | October 29, 2005
The man whom state prosecutors called the "ringleader" in an elaborate scheme to steal $4.2 million from the city school system over 12 years was sentenced in Baltimore City Circuit Court yesterday to five years in prison and three years of supervised probation. Rajiv Dixit, 53, of Reisterstown was led out of Judge Roger Brown's courtroom in handcuffs as his wife cried, despite the efforts of his defense team to paint him as a man who had paid dearly for his crime and whose life had been marred by mental illness.
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