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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1996
Brian Wilson is not going to go quietly.The legendarily acerbic DJ, who for much of the 1980s was one-half of the hugely popular "Brian and O'Brien Show," has filed suit against the station that fired him last November after only three months on the job.Wilson was fired from his morning show on WOCT-FM after weeks of heated complaints from people living in Dundalk, who often found their community on the receiving end of his barbed comments. Letters, community rallies and pressure put on local advertisers left no doubt that people in the southeastern Baltimore County community were not amused by the antics and few tears were shed when he was yanked off the air.The suit, filed Wednesday in Harford County, claims WOCT-FM (104.
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By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2012
Early on "That's Why God Made the Radio," the new Beach Boys album released earlier this month, comes "Isn't It Time," a breezy pop song bursting at its seams with the group's instantly recognizable vocal harmonies. "The world is changed and yet the game is still the same," sings bandleader Brian Wilson. He could be singing about dancing with his favorite girl, but it's also an apt line for California's most famous surf-rockers' current state. Time has passed, but the Beach Boys' most famous trademarks - layered, larger-than-life singing, and sunny lyrics that longingly nod to fleeting summer love - remain intact.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | August 11, 1995
If you set your clock radio to 104.3 on the FM dial, heed this reassurance: You will not be in a 10-year-old dream Monday morning when you wake up to the voice of Brian Wilson.The raucous radio personality who topped the local morning drive-time ratings in the mid-1980s -- and recently tried two-way talk radio -- is coming back with a new morning show."The Brian Wilson Show" premieres at 6 a.m. Monday on WOCT-FM (104.3), a different station but the same frequency where Mr. Wilson reigned from 1984 to 1988 as the lead voice of the funny and sometimes controversial "Brian and O'Brien" show, with Don O'Brien.
SPORTS
July 26, 2011
Beltran to Giants Dan Connolly Baltimore Sun Mets outfielder Carlos Beltran to the Giants for prospects is one trade that can make a difference. This is by default. There is no Cliff Lee on the market, no one guy that transforms a contender into a champion as Lee did with the ace-starved Rangers in 2010. If Mets shortstop Jose Reyes is traded, especially to the Giants, his energy and MVP-type numbers will carry a good team to the promised land.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | April 8, 2008
No matter what happens, Brian Wilson can't seem to stay away from Baltimore for long. From 1984 to 1988, he was among the most popular radio personalities in town. Tomorrow, seemingly a dozen jobs and just as many addresses later, he returns to Charm City's airwaves, as the afternoon voice of WHFS-FM. "It's like this elasticized umbilical cord," he says from the WSPD studios in Toledo, Ohio, where he'll continue to hold down the afternoon drive-time slot he's had since 2005. "I got out of town after '88, then snapped back in the early '90s, then left for New York, then boom, back to Baltimore.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | June 27, 1993
One of early rock's most vivid and enduring myths is that of Brian Wilson, the California dreamer. It's an image easily summoned by anyone familiar with the Beach Boys' saga: pale, pudgy Brian, sitting alone in his room with a piano and a notebook, wistfully writing odes to the waves he never rode, the hot rods he never drove, and the surfer girls he never knew.It's a powerful image despite the irony implicit in his stay-at-home existence, and a marvelous testament to an artist's ability to conjure a whole world though words and music.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2004
If you listen closely - and there is no other way to listen to Brian Wilson's Smile - you can hear Paul McCartney crunching on a stalk of celery. At least, that's who Wilson says it is. His recollections aren't always reliable because he was using a lot of drugs at the time. It was the fall of 1966. His band, the Beach Boys, had just released the instant classic Pet Sounds and was waging a lonely resistance against the British Invasion. It was in the midst of this rivalry with the Beatles that McCartney stopped by the studio where Wilson was working on his next record, what he hoped would be "a teen-aged symphony to God."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer | November 22, 1995
Dundalk won't have Brian Wilson to kick it around anymore.The acerbic morning deejay, whose persistent Dundalk-bashing infuriated residents of the blue-collar Baltimore suburb, is off the air.Ardie Gregory, vice president and general manager of WOCT-FM (104.3), confirmed yesterday that Mr. Wilson no longer works for her station. She declined any further comment, citing "unresolved contractual issues."Mr. Wilson was hired just three months ago, after abruptly giving up his talk-radio slot on WCBM.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 26, 2004
Brian Wilson, Smile (Nonesuch Records, $19.98) The legend that Smile is one of the greatest pop records ever to come undone has floated around for nearly 40 years. It was supposed to be Brian Wilson's ultimate masterstroke, an album that would surpass the magic of his previous work, the Beach Boys' celebrated Pet Sounds from 1966. The arranger-producer and driving force behind the Beach Boys would render the Beatles irrelevant with this wondrous, sonically rich dream. But the recording sessions soon became a nightmare.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 26, 1995
You hire a guy who's known for being obnoxious on the air, who's been ragging on a community in southeast Baltimore County for more than 10 years, whose stint on Baltimore's radio airwaves a decade earlier brought the kind of ratings you've been dreaming of.You ask him to recapture those halcyon days. He tries for three months, using the same on-air persona he's always had, giving you pretty much what you'd expected.Then you fire him.WOCT's Brian Wilson deserved better. He gave the station exactly what it should have expected, and for his trouble got fired only about 90 days into his show -- certainly one of the shortest tenures in local radio history.
NEWS
By Bill Shaikin, Tribune newspapers | November 2, 2010
ARLINGTON, Texas — The Giants landed on the shores of San Francisco 53 years ago, their colors worn by greats identified solely by their last name, Mays and Cepeda graced Seals Stadium. McCovey and Marichal christened Candlestick Park. Bonds lorded over AT&T Park. The statues and the records are theirs. The first World Series championship parade in San Francisco history will be led by a cast lovingly described by its manager as castoffs and misfits. Russ Hodges, rest in peace.
NEWS
By Bill Shaikin, Tribune newspapers | November 1, 2010
ARLINGTON, Texas — These Giants have not known the joy of clinching a postseason series at home, of prancing giddily around the field, of spraying their fans with assorted liquid substances. They might never know that joy. They would happily pay that price in order to win the World Series on Monday. The Giants are one victory from a championship. Never have they won a World Series in San Francisco. But never in their San Francisco history have they led a Series three games to one. They do now, thanks to a pitcher of legal drinking age for all of three months.
NEWS
By Dylan Hernandez, Tribune newspapers | October 20, 2010
SAN FRANCISCO — Matt Cain was always something of a hard-luck loser, an All-Star pitcher with an earned-run average in the mid-3s but a record that didn't reflect it. His career ERA is 3.45, and his lifetime regular-season record 57-62. But Tuesday, Cain won the Giants' most important game since they reached the World Series eight years ago, hurling seven shutout innings in a 3-0 victory over the Phillies in Game 3 of the National League Championship Series. The Giants took a 2-1 lead in the best-of-seven series and will host the next two games.
NEWS
By Dylan Hernandez, Tribune Newspapers | October 11, 2010
ATLANTA — The video scoreboard at Turner Field showed a highlight of Brooks Conrad hitting a home run. The home crowd booed. Conrad stood with his hands by his side. The worst day of his career was playing itself out on a national stage. The stone-gloved second baseman had made two errors Sunday. The Braves were able to overcome the first two. They weren't able to overcome the third. A ninth-inning grounder by Buster Posey passed through Conrad's legs, allowing Freddy Sanchez to score the go-ahead run for the Giants, who went on to claim a 3-2 victory in Game 3 of the National League Division Series.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | February 15, 2009
DAMASCUS - Sure, Brian Wilson can tell you all about his passion for parrots. It is a bond that spurred him to act two weeks ago when he got an emergency request to rescue 81 exotic birds from caged filth at a Gaithersburg townhouse. But the 53-year-old disabled ex-firefighter prefers demonstrating just how well he clicks with these brainy, vocal creatures that can live up to a century. He runs a parrot foundation from his Damascus home, though it seems like their house. His existing flock of several dozen macaws, cockatoos, African grays and other parrot types have the run of his living room, dining room, kitchen, back-room aviary and sun-filled garage.
NEWS
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | September 2, 2008
CD Brian Wilson has some old issues he finally wants to resolve in music - big, whimsical, sun-splashed music. But That Lucky Old Sun, his new CD out today, isn't just a confessional album. It's also a tribute to the time (the 1960s) and place (Southern California) that inspired and shaped his heralded work with the Beach Boys. Although the album's quirkily layered orchestrations evoke the sounds of that bygone era, That Lucky Old Sun lacks the calm and ease of Wilson's past glories, namely 1966's Pet Sounds or 2004's Smile.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | February 15, 2009
DAMASCUS - Sure, Brian Wilson can tell you all about his passion for parrots. It is a bond that spurred him to act two weeks ago when he got an emergency request to rescue 81 exotic birds from caged filth at a Gaithersburg townhouse. But the 53-year-old disabled ex-firefighter prefers demonstrating just how well he clicks with these brainy, vocal creatures that can live up to a century. He runs a parrot foundation from his Damascus home, though it seems like their house. His existing flock of several dozen macaws, cockatoos, African grays and other parrot types have the run of his living room, dining room, kitchen, back-room aviary and sun-filled garage.
NEWS
August 3, 2008
Ernestine Shepherd, 72, a certified personal trainer and aerobics instructor, continues to build on her fabulous-at-any-age image. She was featured in the February edition of UniSun. Shepherd won several awards this summer at the 15th annual 2008 Kina Elyassi NPC Natural East Coast Tournament of Champions Bodybuilding & Figure Championships held in Washington. With an already-lean body, Shepherd shrunk by 12 pounds to about 118 pounds to compete. And she didn't do it without sacrifice.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | April 8, 2008
No matter what happens, Brian Wilson can't seem to stay away from Baltimore for long. From 1984 to 1988, he was among the most popular radio personalities in town. Tomorrow, seemingly a dozen jobs and just as many addresses later, he returns to Charm City's airwaves, as the afternoon voice of WHFS-FM. "It's like this elasticized umbilical cord," he says from the WSPD studios in Toledo, Ohio, where he'll continue to hold down the afternoon drive-time slot he's had since 2005. "I got out of town after '88, then snapped back in the early '90s, then left for New York, then boom, back to Baltimore.
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