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Brian Friel

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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 29, 1999
Rep Stage, the professional theater-in-residence at Howard Community College, has announced details of its 1999-2000 season.Rep Stage's opening play, Brian Friel's "Translations," will run from Sept. 23 through Oct. 10.Kasi Campbell, one of the troupe's mainstays and a Helen Hayes Award nominee, will direct this Irish drama about the suppression of the Gaelic language in Ireland by British authorities in 1833."It's a wonderful play about people, communication and the loss of a native culture," says Valerie Costantini, a Howard Community College professor who founded Rep Stage in 1993.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 13, 2004
The 2004-2005 season at Everyman Theatre will include two Baltimore premieres and a production of Lillian Hellman's The Children's Hour that is a collaborative effort by three institutions. "I always look for collaborations where the sum is much greater than the parts, and I think this is just a natural fit all the way around," artistic director Vincent M. Lancisi says of the venture that involves Everyman, Columbia's Rep Stage and the Baltimore School for the Arts. Reflecting on the nature of the season as a whole, Lancisi cites "friendship and love" as recurring themes, along with the small and interpersonal scale of several of the plays.
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NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 7, 2002
Faith Healer, an absorbing drama by the Irish playwright Brian Friel, receives a fine production at Rep Stage under the direction of Kasi Campbell. The play is a study of three characters. Frank Hardy is an Irishman who has toured Scotland and Wales for 20 years claiming to be a faith healer. Traveling with him were Grace, his mistress who later becomes his wife, and a London man called Teddy who serves as their manager, publicist and general factotum. The three never interact on the stage but speak to the audience in monologues.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 7, 2002
Faith Healer, an absorbing drama by the Irish playwright Brian Friel, receives a fine production at Rep Stage under the direction of Kasi Campbell. The play is a study of three characters. Frank Hardy is an Irishman who has toured Scotland and Wales for 20 years claiming to be a faith healer. Traveling with him were Grace, his mistress who later becomes his wife, and a London man called Teddy who serves as their manager, publicist and general factotum. The three never interact on the stage but speak to the audience in monologues.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 9, 2000
Theatre Hopkins has opened its 2000-2001 season with Tennessee Williams' Pulitzer Prize-winning 1947 play, "A Streetcar Named Desire." Cherie Weinert stars as faded Southern belle Blanche DuBois, and Jim Gallagher is her crude brother-in-law, Stanley Kowalski, under Suzanne Pratt's direction. The play marks the theater's first Williams drama in more than 20 years. Here's the rest of the season: "Faith Healer," by Brian Friel (Feb. 23-March 25); "She Loves Me," by Joe Masteroff, Jerry Bock and Sheldon Harnick (April 20-May 20)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 13, 2004
The 2004-2005 season at Everyman Theatre will include two Baltimore premieres and a production of Lillian Hellman's The Children's Hour that is a collaborative effort by three institutions. "I always look for collaborations where the sum is much greater than the parts, and I think this is just a natural fit all the way around," artistic director Vincent M. Lancisi says of the venture that involves Everyman, Columbia's Rep Stage and the Baltimore School for the Arts. Reflecting on the nature of the season as a whole, Lancisi cites "friendship and love" as recurring themes, along with the small and interpersonal scale of several of the plays.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | December 3, 2006
Seeing Brian Friel's Faith Healer at Performance Workshop Theatre is a little like attending an actual healing. The Irish play tells the story of an itinerant faith healer named Frank Hardy and the mystery that surrounds his final attempted healing. FAITH HEALER / / Through Dec. 10 at Performance Workshop, 28 E. Ostend St. -- $20 -- 410-659-7830 or performanceworkshoptheatre.org.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joe Grossberg | March 12, 1998
Irish playwright Brian Friel brings us "Molly Sweeney," the tragic yet uplifting tale of a blind, beautiful woman and the two most important men in her life: her husband, Frank, who passionately wishes to give his wife the gift of sight, and Dr. Paddy Rice, her renowned eye surgeon.Barry Feinstein directs Cherie Weinert (pictured), J.E. Dockery and Jeff Boyce in this Fell's Point Corner Theatre production.The Fell's Point Corner Theatre, at 251 S. Ann St., will present "Molly Sweeney" from tomorrow through April 19. Performances are at 8 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and at 2 p.m. on Sundays.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 19, 1999
'Tis the time of the Irish at area theaters. "A Couple of Blaguards," a comedy by brothers Frank ("Angela's Ashes") and Malachy ("A Monk Swimming") McCourt is the first of two Irish-themed shows at Ford's Theatre in Washington. The second, "Siamsa Tire, The National Folk Theatre of Ireland," an evening of music, dance and storytelling, runs Nov. 2-14.Meanwhile, Washington's Kennedy Center has launched a multidisciplinary festival titled "Island: The Art of Ireland," with the American premiere of Lennox Robinson's domestic comedy, "The Whiteheaded Boy," produced by Barabbas.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2006
`Let My People Go' local premiere The lowdown -- The harrowing and noble history of the Underground Railroad, which led to freedom for many slaves before the Civil War, will be recalled in song and narrative by a multitude of voices Sunday afternoon. This season-opening presentation by the top-notch Baltimore Choral Arts Society, led by Tom Hall, offers the local premiere of Donald McCullough's Let My People Go, with its fresh settings of traditional spirituals. Joining the chorus will be the forces of the famed Morgan State University Choir and the City College High School Choir.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 9, 2000
Theatre Hopkins has opened its 2000-2001 season with Tennessee Williams' Pulitzer Prize-winning 1947 play, "A Streetcar Named Desire." Cherie Weinert stars as faded Southern belle Blanche DuBois, and Jim Gallagher is her crude brother-in-law, Stanley Kowalski, under Suzanne Pratt's direction. The play marks the theater's first Williams drama in more than 20 years. Here's the rest of the season: "Faith Healer," by Brian Friel (Feb. 23-March 25); "She Loves Me," by Joe Masteroff, Jerry Bock and Sheldon Harnick (April 20-May 20)
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 29, 1999
Rep Stage, the professional theater-in-residence at Howard Community College, has announced details of its 1999-2000 season.Rep Stage's opening play, Brian Friel's "Translations," will run from Sept. 23 through Oct. 10.Kasi Campbell, one of the troupe's mainstays and a Helen Hayes Award nominee, will direct this Irish drama about the suppression of the Gaelic language in Ireland by British authorities in 1833."It's a wonderful play about people, communication and the loss of a native culture," says Valerie Costantini, a Howard Community College professor who founded Rep Stage in 1993.
NEWS
November 25, 1995
Edith Haggard, 92, a New York literary agent whose clients included Adela Rogers St. Johns, Ogden Nash and Sinclair Lewis, died Thursday in the Whitney Pavilion of New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. In her 30-year career, Mrs. Haggard, who joined the Curtis Brown agency in 1937, became one of the city's best-known agents. Other clients included Nunnally Johnson, Phyllis McGinley and Vera Caspary.William Myers, 74, an actor who appeared on Broadway and television, died in New York City of pneumonia Wednesday.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | April 28, 1992
New York -- "Dancing at Lughnasa," Brian Friel's play about five unmarried sisters in the Ireland of 1936, won the Outer Critics Circle award yesterday for best Broadway play of the 1991-92 season. "Crazy for You," with music and lyrics by George and Ira Gershwin and book by Ken Ludwig, was named outstanding Broadway musical.Scott McPherson, author of "Marvin's Room," was given the John Gassner Award for an American playwright; his play also won the award for best off-Broadway play. "Song of Singapore" was chosen best off-Broadway musical and also won awards for its book, music and lyrics.
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