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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1998
As historic preservationists trekked through the tattered Brexton Apartments and pigeon feathers swirled around their feet, the group heard an impassioned rationale for saving the Victorian residential hotel where Wallis Warfield, later Duchess of Windsor, lived -- however briefly -- during her Baltimore childhood."
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FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
A few years ago, Richard Larison was leading efforts for Johns Hopkins Medicine International to expand health care access at a local hospital in Panama City, Panama, when a thought popped into his head. "You know, there are still people in my own country that still don't have access to good health care," Larison remembered thinking. Fast-forward to July 2012, when Larison stepped into a new role as CEO of Chase Brexton Health Care, a Baltimore-based nonprofit clinic embarking on an ambitious expansion in multiple suburban locations and a newly renovated headquarters in Mount Vernon.
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NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1999
ONE OF BALTIMORE'S architectural gems, the Brexton apartments in Mount Vernon, is headed for the auction block.Express Auction Marketing Specialists, headed by Larry Makowski, plans to sell the six-story brick building at 3 p.m. Wednesday in an auction on the premises at 868 Park Ave.The sale is a sign that the owner, a local investment group known as Dakota Trade Associates, has decided not to restore the Victorian landmark, which opened in 1891 as a...
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Playwright, film director and LGBT cult favorite Del Shores will be in Baltimore on Sunday for a meet-and-greet with fans, a costume contest and a double billing of two of his films: "Sordid Lives" and "Southern Baptist Sissies. " The ticket-only event was put together as an early offering from B'More QFest , which is hosting a four-day film and media festival in Baltimore in June, of which Gay in Maryland is a sponsor. The event Sunday is being called the "Southern Tragic Humor Double Bill" -- perhaps for obvious reasons.
NEWS
October 18, 1997
A City/County Digest item in Thursday's editions of The Sun gave incorrect times for viewing a panel from the Names Project AIDS Memorial Quilt. The panel will be on display from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday and Thursday at Chase-Brexton Health Services, 1001 Cathedral The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 10/18/97
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | December 4, 1993
Chase-Brexton Clinic Inc. said it will buy the 20,000-square-foot office building at 1001 Cathedral St. by the end of the month, giving the city's second-biggest AIDS clinic needed expansion space and generating a new use for a building that had been foreclosed upon."
NEWS
By Diane Winston | December 8, 1990
Fearful that medical care is being compromised by administrative mismanagement, several doctors and staff members at Baltimore's Chase-Brexton Clinic say they are considering resigning since the board of directors has refused to fire the head of the gay and lesbian health-care clinic."
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | May 4, 1995
There's a sad irony involving the Cathedral Street building that was selected as the new home for Chase-Brexton Health Services Inc.In the late 1970s and early 1980s, it was the home of Girard's, one of the most sophisticated discos Baltimore had ever seen -- the local equivalent of New York's Studio 54.Now, as the headquarters of Chase-Brexton, it's home for Maryland's largest community-based provider of HIV-related health care.And many of the people who go there now for care were once patrons of the well-known nightclub.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1995
Quaint, unassuming Tyson Street, tucked away in Baltimore's Mount Vernon District, seems an unlikely place to start a revolution.But nearly 50 years ago, artist Edward Rosenfeld did just that when he bought one of the small brick-fronted rowhouses in the 900 block, between Read Street and Park Avenue, and launched the country's first privately financed urban renaissance.Other artists and artisans followed their friend to create their own little colony. They restored the early 19th-century homes, created elaborate gardens and painted the fronts in a rainbow of colors, which led to the nickname "The Pastel Block" and inclusion in the Encyclopaedia Britannica in the 1950s.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1995
He knows he will lose them. No matter how high their red blood cell count is today, no matter how strong their pulse, his patients will all die of AIDS.Dirk Le Flore, a nurse at the Chase-Brexton Clinic, doesn't think about the inevitable. He thinks about now. And how to assure that his patients' health is as good as it can be for as long as it can be.Mr. Le Flore's devotion is eloquently expressed in a photographic exhibition, "Together: With AIDS," opening today at School 33 Art Center in observance of World AIDS Day. As part of an exploration of the bonds between people with AIDS and their care givers, Baltimore photographer Michela S. Caudill followed Mr. Le Flore for over a year, capturing his career as a home-care nurse to HIV-infected men and women as well as an evening triage nurse at Chase-Brexton Clinic.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
Advocates and health care providers for LGBT and HIV-positive residents in Maryland have been scrambling for months to gather information on how the Affordable Care Act will impact their clients -- and now they're looking to share the information. "We really need help to get the word out," said Doug Rose, a volunteer with Equality Maryland, at a public meeting on the health care rollout in Mount Vernon on Monday night. "I think a lot of people still don't know what to do. " Rose said lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals and those who are HIV-positive have experienced historic discrimination in the health insurance market -- with women and gay men at times facing steeper fees -- that the ACA now forbids.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
When it first opened its doors in 1978, Chase Brexton was a small operation of volunteers started to address the new AIDS epidemic and its effect on gay men, the population most hit at the time by the disease. The organization has since grown into one that offers a broad range of medical care. It now has a strong primary care component, a pharmacy, and mental health and dental services. Its reach spans far beyond AIDS patients - which now make up 16 percent of it clientele - and Baltimore's gay population.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
In the early days of the HIV/AIDS crisis, when diagnoses were far more likely to kill than they are today, those in Baltimore who lost their fight with the dreaded disease were memorialized with small tiles mounted in the lobby of Chase Brexton Health Care in Mount Vernon. On Thursday, as Chase Brexton prepares to move to its new offices in the historic Monumental Life Building, about 75 family members and friends of those memorialized in the "Wall of Courage" took a candlelight march to mark the transfer of the memorial.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2013
Uninsured and diagnosed with HIV in 2004, Northeast Baltimore resident Dorothea Townes visits Chase Brexton Health Services' Mount Vernon clinic at least once a month to pick up medications and get checkups. "It's a big difference," Townes, 49, said of the personalized treatment she receives compared with the care her friends get at hospitals. Community health centers such as Chase Brexton are about to play a far larger role in the nation's health care when the federal health reform law is fully implemented in January.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
Dr. Ruth H. Singer, a retired physician who was a state health administrator and later worked in AIDS and HIV treatment at Chase Brexton Health Services, died of pancreatic cancer May 27 at her North Baltimore home. She was 69. "What one loved about Ruth is that she never held back," said Dr. Alfred "Al" Sommer, dean emeritus of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. "If something was too soft and dreamy, she insisted on facing the practical nature of the course of action and hoped for an outcome.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | October 5, 2012
Chase Brexton Health Services began renovations this week on a new location in Mt. Vernon that will allow it to see four times as many medical patients. The community health center is moving next year a few blocks from its current building to the historic Monumental Life Building on Charles Street. Lt. Governor Anthony Brown and Baltimore City Health Commissioner Dr. Oxiris Barbot joined Chase Brexton staff Thursday to celebrate the beginning of renovations. The expansion into the 95,000-square-foot building will allow the 35-year-old organization to offer more services, including dental care to two times as many patients and behavioral health care to four times as many patients.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | September 30, 2001
Some 300 people in polyester and psychedelic colors, big hair and platform shoes streamed into the Waxter Center, party faces on. Inside, a huge mirrored ball hung from the ceiling, pulsing light in time to disco music. It was a pop-culture nightmare: The '70s were back -- but at least it was in the name of charity. "This is our signature event," says Karen Bellesky, a grants manager at Chase Brexton Health Services. "The reason we do a retro dance is because back in 1978, Chase Brexton [opened]
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
Dr. Robert Russell Kent, a cardiologist who left his field to serve Baltimore AIDS patients and the sick in Third World countries, died of cancer Monday at his home in Lutherville. He was 77. Born in Los Angeles and raised in Washington, D.C., he was a 1951 graduate of Woodrow Wilson High School. After attending the Johns Hopkins University for three years as an undergraduate, he entered the Air Force as a pilot. He and his wife, the former Joankay Woodside, were married at Andrews Air Force Base.
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