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ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | February 29, 2012
With a name like Heavy Seas Alehouse, you might expect that the new bar and restaurant in Little Italy/Harbor East would be a shrine to the esteemed Baltimore craft brewery. Hugh Sisson, the brewery's founder, said before the opening that licensing the name was meant as a showcase for the brand. And the beer list that was previewed underscored that point — all Heavy Seas, all the time. But for all the Heavy Seas love, this isn't a venue that appeals to just fans of the beer. In fact, it is the first great new bar of the year, more than meeting the expectations set by the Heavy Seas name.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2012
"Back again, back again, we've got Franklin D. Roosevelt back again, since Roosevelt's been re-elected moonshine liquor's been corrected, we've got legal wine, whiskey, beer and gin. " —Recorded by Bill Cox in 1936 Happy New Year! Oh, I'm sorry. I didn't mean to be so loud. If you're suffering a bit this morning from too much New Year's Eve revelry and your head feels as though it was hit by a baseball bat and your stomach is churning like an Atlantic hurricane, you might want to consider skipping this column (I promise not to be offended)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2011
So how did the new Heavy Seas Ale House happen? After all, Hugh Sisson, the Heavy Seas founder, had resisted businesses outside his brewery for years after he sold his shares in Sisson's, his first brewpub. Well, the new restaurant, which is expected to open sometime this Spring, has a new venue to thank for its creation: Leinenkugel's Beer Garden . Patrick Dahlgren, who'll be running the new pub, said that if out-of-state breweries, like Leinenkugel's, can license their name and open up a store-front in Baltimore, then it was time for a local like Heavy Seas to do the same.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2011
The Brewer's Alley brew pub in the heart of downtown has been chugging along for 15 years, slowly adding artisanal beers to its stable, resisting temptation to expand when it seemed every wannabe brewer with some start-up capital and a disdain for Budweiser got into the craft beer business. This year the pub faced a crucial test: "What we had to decide a little while ago was, either stay at capacity as a small pub, or continue to meet demand and possibly create more demand," said Tom Flores, brewmaster at Brewer's Alley.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2011
There's no denying — craft beers are more popular than they've been in decades. To keep up with demand, restaurants and bars have upped their draft selections, hosted beer tastings and started pairing food with beers. In the Baltimore region, few restaurants fill this niche as well as Frisco Taphouse and Brewery . This Columbia restaurant and bar serves a fantastic selection of beers, and backs it up with solid dishes. Crowds have responded — on a recent Wednesday night, Frisco was packed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2011
A tour of the American Brewery Building has been added to the Baltimore Beer Week schedule. The American Brewery is now in the hands of Humanin , a Columbia, Md.-based non-profit serving disabled individuals, which completed a stellar renovation of the iconic building in 2009. The organizers of the Baltimore Beer Week have arranged for the public to gain one morning's access to the building. The tour day is Saturday, Oct. 8, and the public will be admitted in beginning at 9 a.m. The last visitors will be admitted in at 12:30 p.m., and everyone has to be out by 12:45 p.m. You will be out just in time for the next Baltimore Beer Week event, which looks to be Maryland Brewer's Oktoberfest at Timonium Fairgrounds . Here's more information about the event , including parking, and more information about the building and its award-winning renovation on the Humanin website .
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | September 30, 2011
Who said Baltimore Beer Week was only about craft brews and getting drunk off samples? On Oct. 7, Flying Dog Brewery - through Habitat for Humanity of the Chesapeake - will build a house in the Jefferson Street neighborhood. If you're not in the mood to pitch in with hammers and nails, you can head over to Langermann's that night (6-10 p.m.). The Canton restaurant will donate $1 from all Flying Dog pints to Habitat for Humanity of the Chesapeake. Added bonus: the first beer is on Flying Dog for any Red Hat volunteer, AmeriCorps or person who donates/signs up to volunteer with Habitat that night.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | September 29, 2011
At last, beer - at least here in Howard County - has attained the level of sophistication that wine achieved decades ago. That is due in part to the monthly beer-tasting dinners hosted by Victoria Gastro Pub in Columbia. Usually held on Tuesday or Wednesday nights, participants - 40 or so - are treated to a variety of styles from one particular boutique brewery Such beers are a cut above the plebian beverages to which manh people become accustomed at sports bars, ball games and crab feasts.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2011
Two more firefighters battling a fire at a vacant brewery complex in Brewers Hill were treated for heat exhaustion, bringing the total injured to five, a city fire spokesman said. All but one had been treated and released by Friday morning, according to the spokesman, Capt. Roman Clark. Firefighters responded to calls for fire in part of the old Gunther Brewery complex in the 1200 block of S. Conkling St. at about 2 p.m. Thursday. Clark said it wasn't brought under control until 5:45 a.m. Friday — more than 15 hours later.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2011
Flying Dog Ales resumed public tours of their Frederick brewery in June for the first time in over a year and a half. And it seems they're going over well with the beer's fans. Ben Savage, a spokesman for the company, said public tours are booked solid through September. Reservations will open up again in October. In holding the tours, Flying Dog becomes the fourth Maryland brewery to hold public tours , after Heavy Seas, DuClaw, and on the smaller side of things, Brewer's Art. They're something of a vindication for the Frederick-based brewery, which had suspended the tours to protest a Maryland sampling law that many brewers disliked and lobbied to change.
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