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By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1997
It took three years, a change of ownership and costly renovations, but the Ellicott Mills Brewing Co. finally celebrated its grand opening in Ellicott City this past weekend.The restaurant and brew pub opened the doors of its 148-year-old, two-story granite building on Main Street almost two months ago, but didn't formally mark its opening until its first batch of German pilsner was brewed and ready for consumption, said William Pastino, one of the restaurant's four owners."This has been a long process," Pastino said.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
Ann H. Sisson, who established with her husband a popular Federal Hill restaurant and bar that later became the state's first brew pub, died June 4 from complications of dementia at Keswick Multi-Care Center. She was 89. The daughter of a civil engineer and a homemaker, the former Ann Elizabeth Hamill was born in Baltimore and raised on St. Dunstans Garth in Homeland. After graduating in 1941 from Mount St. Agnes High School, she attended Mercy Hospital School of Nursing for a year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | April 8, 1999
Sisson's at 36 E. Cross St. -- probably Baltimore's most famous brew pub, and certainly its most famous Cajun and Creole restaurant -- is for sale. When Al and Annie Sisson, the original owners, retired to North Carolina three years ago, their son Jack Callanan became manager and president. Now he's ready to move on.No word yet on who might be taking over. "I see it as a year-long process," says Callanan. "We have a commitment to keep Sisson's as it is, and thriving." Which sounds like you won't be seeing haute French cuisine served there anytime soon.
NEWS
By Donna Ellis | November 8, 2012
You have to be in pretty good shape to make it up the myriad stairs leading to the main dining room at the Ellicott Mills Brewing Company. But once there - above the din of the street level bar - you'll be glad you made the effort. The spacious 120-seat area is nicely laid out. That, and the menu, promise the opportunity to enjoy good food and conversation with your companions. This historical building at 8308 Main Street is all brick and stone and hard wood, bespeaking the solid foundations upon which this 19th century mill and railroad town were built.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | June 8, 2009
Albert F. Sisson, a founder of a popular Cross Street brew pub, died of heart failure Friday at the Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Glen Arm resident was 81. Born in Baltimore and raised on Goodwood Gardens, he left McDonogh School, where he played lacrosse and wrestled, and joined the Navy at age 18 during World War II. After the war, he returned to McDonogh and graduated in 1947. He then attended Loyola College where he also played lacrosse. A business entrepreneur, he owned and operated a rug cleaning business and later had a stainless steel fabricating firm in Locust Point.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
Ann H. Sisson, who established with her husband a popular Federal Hill restaurant and bar that later became the state's first brew pub, died June 4 from complications of dementia at Keswick Multi-Care Center. She was 89. The daughter of a civil engineer and a homemaker, the former Ann Elizabeth Hamill was born in Baltimore and raised on St. Dunstans Garth in Homeland. After graduating in 1941 from Mount St. Agnes High School, she attended Mercy Hospital School of Nursing for a year.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | August 31, 1997
Pity the Capitol City Brewing Company.The opening of Harborplace's new brew pub at the beginning of July went virtually unnoticed because the Hard Rock Cafe Baltimore, also brand-new and also in the Inner Harbor, got all the press.There are similarities between the two beyond the coincidence of their openings: Both are chains. (Capitol City has four other locations in the Washington area.) Both have major bars, and both specialize in casual food and bar fare.But the audiences are different.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | May 20, 2001
Like much of south Baltimore, Baltimore's venerable brew pub Sisson's has gotten gussied up. If the term fern bar didn't have a derogatory connotation, I could call it that. Not that there are ferns around; but the newly renovated Sisson's has that pretty blond wood, exposed brick look that will be anathema to people who hung out there in the '80s when it was still a neighborhood saloon. Sisson's has new owners, a new look and, above all, a new menu. Gone is the combination of pub grub, Cajun dishes and food cooked in beer.
NEWS
September 10, 1995
Firm wins contract to design brew pubArchitectural Design Works Inc., a Harford County-based architectural design firm, was commissioned to design the county's first micro-brewery, the DuClaw Brew Pub.The 10,000 square-foot brew pub will serve as an anchor tenant to the new 22,000 square-foot retail building that is being constructed at the Bel Air South Station shopping center, Route 24.Special features of the brew pub will include suspended taps which...
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | September 24, 1995
SEATTLE -- For beer drinkers who get sleepy after a brew or two, a new beer with a kick is on the way.Starbucks Coffee Co. and Redhook Ale Brewery have joined forces to brew Double Black Stout, a dark roasted malt beer brewed by Redhook with the added flavor of Starbucks coffee. )) The brew will have 30 milligrams of caffeine per 22-ounce bottle, one-quarter the strength of a cup of regular drip coffee. Beer ordinarily has no caffeine.As specialty and flavored beers increase in popularity, some say the coffee combination has a good chance of success.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, Special To The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
Dempsey's Brew Pub isn't quite a home run. But it is a solid hit — rounding the bases and heading for home. This newest addition to Camden Yards' eatery options, backed by legendary Oriole catcher Rick Dempsey, debuted on Opening Day this year. Housed in on the Eutaw Street side of the stadium, in the historic B&O warehouse, Dempsey's interior is a love letter to baseball, and the menu is a bar-food homage to Baltimore. The restaurant is open only to ticket-holders during home Orioles games.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
The crowd inside Pratt Street Ale House on a recent Saturday night was anemic. It was 1 a.m. and a handful of couples idled at the bar and at the sandy brown high-top tables. Some talked among themselves, others watched a hockey game on ESPN. "Don't Stop Believin'" was on. A half hour later, lights came up, and the bartenders started shooing everyone out. The scene looked like something out of a brand-new bar on a Tuesday night, not one that's been open for three years, and a place that's doubled as the home for Oliver Breweries for 19. But the same thing happened two nights earlier, also some time past midnight.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2012
In 1912, when Fenway Park opened as the home of the Boston Red Sox, fans went to a baseball game because they wanted to watch a baseball game. One hundred years later, stadiums are much more complicated places, filled with fans hoping for a variety of experiences. Some seek a hip place to socialize, others work out important business deals. Parents have taken to going to the park in search of entertainment for their kids — though not necessarily on the field — and even child care, while foodies might buy a ticket to try a new restaurant or concession stand.
TRAVEL
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | August 9, 2009
When Brian Frueh and his wife, Lynda, traveled to Ocean City this summer for a week of vacation they brought their taste for craft beer with them. And so on a recent Friday afternoon the couple was lunching at Island Oasis, a small restaurant on Route 611 just west of Ocean City. Choosing from 12 beers on tap, Frueh sampled a Pale Ale from Evolution, a new craft brewery in Delmar, Del., just north of Salisbury. After lunch he enjoyed a glass of Peg Leg Stout, made in Baltimore by Clipper City Brewing.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | June 8, 2009
Albert F. Sisson, a founder of a popular Cross Street brew pub, died of heart failure Friday at the Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Glen Arm resident was 81. Born in Baltimore and raised on Goodwood Gardens, he left McDonogh School, where he played lacrosse and wrestled, and joined the Navy at age 18 during World War II. After the war, he returned to McDonogh and graduated in 1947. He then attended Loyola College where he also played lacrosse. A business entrepreneur, he owned and operated a rug cleaning business and later had a stainless steel fabricating firm in Locust Point.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | October 25, 2007
In the past few years, a bunch of popular Baltimore bars have expanded or moved to the 'burbs. Most of them (Looney's, MaGerk's, Ropewalk, etc.) ended up with sister locations in Bel Air. So it makes sense for the folks behind the Dog Pub in Federal Hill to spawn a Columbia branch called the Pub Dog Pizza and Drafthouse. The Pub Dog opened a couple months ago, replacing a Hard Times Cafe, which apparently fell on, um, hard times. I'm not sure whether there are more plans for the pub's outer facade, but it needs more lights and a more prominently displayed sign.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 1, 2003
To be fair, Ryleigh's doesn't claim to be a restaurant. The Federal Hill establishment, which opened in November, describes itself as a brew pub and raw bar. So maybe it's not fair to expect restaurant-quality food. However, a brew pub ought to have beer that is decent, not flat and bland. I sent back my Marble Golden Ale because it had no fizz and got another that wasn't much better. Another, called Raspberry Wheat, was so sweet and carbonation-free it seemed more like a juice than a brew.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large | May 30, 1996
The brewer's artBeing a graduate student at Hopkins, Greg Santori says, afforded him plenty of time to brew beer in his basement. From that modest beginning grew the idea of a brew pub and restaurant, which will become a reality when Brewer's Art opens in late July at 1106 N. Charles St. He and co-owner Volker Stewart, formerly a librarian at the University of Maryland, have hired Michael Dalesio as a consultant and Johey Verfaille, a Donna's graduate, as...
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2007
When Sisson's became Baltimore's first brewpub in the late 1980s, beer lovers embraced the Federal Hill bar's high-quality, finely hopped ales. Within months, more than 90 percent of the beer it sold was brewed there. But two decades later, with a new owner and a new name, Ryleigh's Brew Pub, demand for the home brew had all but dried up, and the metal vats unceremoniously made way for an oyster bar. Once urban mainstays, bars that brew their own beer in-house are becoming increasingly rare in cities along the East Coast.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | September 19, 2004
Yes, you should go to the DuClaw Brewing Co. first for the beer M-y particularly if you like to experiment. This local microbrewery and pub chain offers a new seasonal beer every month, as well as six mainstays. But when a brew pub opens up in as great a location as DuClawM-Fs latest M-y Bond Street Wharf in Fells Point M-y it deserves consideration even if you have no interest in beer at all. The 7,500 square feet of bar and restaurant at Bond and Thames streets overlooks historic rowhouses and cobblestone streets; but the decor is sleekly contemporary, about as far from a conventional brew pub as you can imagine.
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