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By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2001
Did you ever have such a bad dream that you feel relieved that the details are lost in the fuzz of waking up? "Monkeybone" has the same effect. Brendan Fraser is Stu Miley, whose Monkeybone loony-toon is on the verge of becoming the next big thing in the animation industry. Plagued by nightmares until he's treated by Bridget Fonda's earnest doctor Julie McElroy, Stu channels his repressed bad boy tendencies into his simian sidekick. An accident sends Stu into Downtown, a kind of purgatory where souls await their fate.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH | October 28, 2008
[New Line Cinema] Starring Brendan Fraser, Josh Hutcherson, Anita Briem. Directed by Eric Brevig. $28.98 (Blu-ray $35.99) ** 1/2 dvds If 3-D really is the future of cinema, as some filmmakers and Hollywood executives think, then consider Journey to the Center of the Earth a harbinger of things to come - and take delight in what it has to offer. Inspired by Jules Verne's classic 19th-century adventure yarn (technically, it's something of a sequel), this Journey offers Brendan Fraser as Trevor Anderson, a professor who comes upon a book annotated by his explorer brother, who died trying to make his own journey to the Earth's core.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Staff Writer | August 5, 1994
"Airheads" is a likably breezy film that should prove successful with its target audience and even bring more than a few smiles to the face of someone much older.Three frustrated L.A. rockers, desperate to get air time for their demo tape, inadvertently take over a rock radio station because they happen to be carrying water pistols that resemble Uzis. What kind of guy still plays with water pistols? Guys like Chazz (Brendan Fraser), Rex (Steve Buscemi) and Pip (Adam Sandler), who aren't too bright.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | August 22, 2008
Capsules by Michael Sragow. Full reviews are at baltimoresun.com/movies. The Dark Knight Heath Ledger gives a bravura performance as the Joker in this handsome piece of work, but it takes you from absorption to excruciation within 20 minutes, and then goes on for two hours more. It's scaled to be an urban epic about the deterioration of hope and possibility in Batman's (Christian Bale) hometown, Gotham City, but there isn't a single inspired moment in it. Yes, Ledger detonates a savage sick joke or two. But it's a Pyrrhic acting victory.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | October 28, 2008
[New Line Cinema] Starring Brendan Fraser, Josh Hutcherson, Anita Briem. Directed by Eric Brevig. $28.98 (Blu-ray $35.99) ** 1/2 dvds If 3-D really is the future of cinema, as some filmmakers and Hollywood executives think, then consider Journey to the Center of the Earth a harbinger of things to come - and take delight in what it has to offer. Inspired by Jules Verne's classic 19th-century adventure yarn (technically, it's something of a sequel), this Journey offers Brendan Fraser as Trevor Anderson, a professor who comes upon a book annotated by his explorer brother, who died trying to make his own journey to the Earth's core.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1996
Talk-show host and so-so actress Ricki Lake is buoyed by a fortunate cast in "Mrs. Winterbourne," a modern fairy-tale that begins awkwardly but will eventually win over most romantics.It's a lot like "While You Were Sleeping" in its mistaken-identity plot (Does the line "I fell in love with you all!" sound familiar?), but "Mrs. W" is far more uneven. Still, like a vacation occasionally interrupted by bad weather, it's a pleasant escape.Lake plays Connie Doyle, a dim 18-year-old who goes to New Yawk, hooks up with a loser, gets pregnant and is thrown out on the street.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 1, 1999
``Gods and Monsters'' takes as its narrative engine the mysterious death of director James Whale in 1957 and the events that may have led up to it.A strange little film that speculates that Whale befriended a strapping young man, tried to woo him, and finally implicated him in his own suicide, ``Gods and Monsters'' features an extraordinary performance by Ian McKellen as the self-invented Whale. It also connects in a fascinating way his most famous movie -- ``The Bride of Frankenstein'' -- and the trauma he suffered in World War I.Still, an oddly misplaced temporal sense keeps ``Gods and Monsters'' from being the gripping story it should be. Director Bill Condon has carefully reconstructed Whale's gorgeous California home, but contemporary feeling still suffuses the film, which is set in the 1950s.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and SUN FILM CRITIC | January 1, 1999
"Gods and Monsters" takes as its narrative engine the mysterious death of director James Whale in 1957 and the events that may have led up to it.A strange little film that speculates that Whale befriended a strapping young man, tried to woo him, and finally implicated him in his own suicide, "Gods and Monsters" features an extraordinary performance by Ian McKellen as the self-invented Whale. It also connects in a fascinating way his most famous movie -- "The Bride of Frankenstein" -- and the trauma he suffered in World War I.Still, an oddly misplaced temporal sense keeps "Gods and Monsters" from being the gripping story it should be. Director Bill Condon has carefully reconstructed Whale's gorgeous California home, but contemporary feeling still suffuses the film, which is set in the 1950s.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 14, 2003
Looney Tunes: Back In Action proves that cinematic revivals can be done right, with all the spirit of the originals intact, yet with enough of a contemporary feel to fit right into the present day. Like the best of the old Looney Tunes, which gave the world Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, et al., Back In Action is replete with so many wisecracks, puns, double entendres and visual jokes that you almost need a flow chart to keep up with them all. But...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 18, 1992
"School Ties" is the kind of earnest, issue-oriented filmmaking that somehow doesn't seem to be in fashion any more, and it faces a real danger, lacking pyrotechnics or edge, of getting buried in the box-office deluge of a Friday with five other films opening, especially one called "Husbands and Wives."A shame. The movie is made with craft and sensitivity. It explores that troubling issue of ethnic identity and how to maintain it in the presence of mainstream pressures to conform, which seems to be today's real killer in a number of differentcommunities.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | August 1, 2008
Three yetis, a yak and a couple of yuks. That's all you get in the way of original entertainment in The Mummy: The Tomb of the Dragon Emperor, an extravagant and frenetic third entry in the franchise about adventurer Rick O'Connell (Brendan Fraser) and his continuing fights with the embalmed yet undead. It's like an Indiana Jones movie without rhythm, wit or personality, just a desperate, headlong pace. It does have a sense of the ridiculous (one character declares "You guys are like mummy magnets!"
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 14, 2003
Looney Tunes: Back In Action proves that cinematic revivals can be done right, with all the spirit of the originals intact, yet with enough of a contemporary feel to fit right into the present day. Like the best of the old Looney Tunes, which gave the world Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, et al., Back In Action is replete with so many wisecracks, puns, double entendres and visual jokes that you almost need a flow chart to keep up with them all. But...
FEATURES
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2001
Did you ever have such a bad dream that you feel relieved that the details are lost in the fuzz of waking up? "Monkeybone" has the same effect. Brendan Fraser is Stu Miley, whose Monkeybone loony-toon is on the verge of becoming the next big thing in the animation industry. Plagued by nightmares until he's treated by Bridget Fonda's earnest doctor Julie McElroy, Stu channels his repressed bad boy tendencies into his simian sidekick. An accident sends Stu into Downtown, a kind of purgatory where souls await their fate.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 1, 1999
``Gods and Monsters'' takes as its narrative engine the mysterious death of director James Whale in 1957 and the events that may have led up to it.A strange little film that speculates that Whale befriended a strapping young man, tried to woo him, and finally implicated him in his own suicide, ``Gods and Monsters'' features an extraordinary performance by Ian McKellen as the self-invented Whale. It also connects in a fascinating way his most famous movie -- ``The Bride of Frankenstein'' -- and the trauma he suffered in World War I.Still, an oddly misplaced temporal sense keeps ``Gods and Monsters'' from being the gripping story it should be. Director Bill Condon has carefully reconstructed Whale's gorgeous California home, but contemporary feeling still suffuses the film, which is set in the 1950s.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and SUN FILM CRITIC | January 1, 1999
"Gods and Monsters" takes as its narrative engine the mysterious death of director James Whale in 1957 and the events that may have led up to it.A strange little film that speculates that Whale befriended a strapping young man, tried to woo him, and finally implicated him in his own suicide, "Gods and Monsters" features an extraordinary performance by Ian McKellen as the self-invented Whale. It also connects in a fascinating way his most famous movie -- "The Bride of Frankenstein" -- and the trauma he suffered in World War I.Still, an oddly misplaced temporal sense keeps "Gods and Monsters" from being the gripping story it should be. Director Bill Condon has carefully reconstructed Whale's gorgeous California home, but contemporary feeling still suffuses the film, which is set in the 1950s.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1997
Disney's new, live-action version of the 1960s cartoon series "George of the Jungle" perfectly captures the sensibilities of the original.That's a good thing?I hated the cartoon, and not just for the most inane theme song ever produced. Even then, "George of the Jungle" typified for me a cynical adult notion that if you just put moving images on the television screen, kids would lap it up. It was one of those lazy animations where the backgrounds would loop around so that the characters in the foreground would keep running past the same items over and over again.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | August 1, 2008
Three yetis, a yak and a couple of yuks. That's all you get in the way of original entertainment in The Mummy: The Tomb of the Dragon Emperor, an extravagant and frenetic third entry in the franchise about adventurer Rick O'Connell (Brendan Fraser) and his continuing fights with the embalmed yet undead. It's like an Indiana Jones movie without rhythm, wit or personality, just a desperate, headlong pace. It does have a sense of the ridiculous (one character declares "You guys are like mummy magnets!"
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1997
Disney's new, live-action version of the 1960s cartoon series "George of the Jungle" perfectly captures the sensibilities of the original.That's a good thing?I hated the cartoon, and not just for the most inane theme song ever produced. Even then, "George of the Jungle" typified for me a cynical adult notion that if you just put moving images on the television screen, kids would lap it up. It was one of those lazy animations where the backgrounds would loop around so that the characters in the foreground would keep running past the same items over and over again.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1996
Talk-show host and so-so actress Ricki Lake is buoyed by a fortunate cast in "Mrs. Winterbourne," a modern fairy-tale that begins awkwardly but will eventually win over most romantics.It's a lot like "While You Were Sleeping" in its mistaken-identity plot (Does the line "I fell in love with you all!" sound familiar?), but "Mrs. W" is far more uneven. Still, like a vacation occasionally interrupted by bad weather, it's a pleasant escape.Lake plays Connie Doyle, a dim 18-year-old who goes to New Yawk, hooks up with a loser, gets pregnant and is thrown out on the street.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Staff Writer | August 5, 1994
"Airheads" is a likably breezy film that should prove successful with its target audience and even bring more than a few smiles to the face of someone much older.Three frustrated L.A. rockers, desperate to get air time for their demo tape, inadvertently take over a rock radio station because they happen to be carrying water pistols that resemble Uzis. What kind of guy still plays with water pistols? Guys like Chazz (Brendan Fraser), Rex (Steve Buscemi) and Pip (Adam Sandler), who aren't too bright.
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