Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBreeding Pairs
IN THE NEWS

Breeding Pairs

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1998
The peregrine falcon will be removed from the endangered species list, according to a proposal to be announced today by Bruce Babbitt, secretary of the Department of the Interior."
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2004
ABOVE THE RAPPAHANNOCK RIVER - Because it takes one to know one, Jim Wortham flies low and fast toward the river. His quarry, bobbing on the surface and resting in marsh grass, begin to rise in pairs and flocks, their shadows and the shadow of the pontoon plane skimming together along the brown water. As the formation sorts itself out, Wortham starts his head count, a sophisticated game of duck, duck, goose, with some swans thrown in for good measure. "As a biologist, there's no better perspective," says Wortham, a Baltimore resident who has been with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for eight years.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1999
Maryland's midwinter count of waterfowl showed substantial increases over last year in numbers of several duck species and the migrant population of Canada geese, which registered the highest numbers since 1995."
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2002
It sounds like a critter from a cheap science fiction movie, a companion for the Creature from the Black Lagoon. But this fish is real and it's living in a pond in Crofton. A northern snakehead, usually found in the Yangtze River region of China, was hooked by an angler last month in the pond behind the Dunkin Donuts on Route 3. Torpedo-shaped and aggressive, snakeheads lurk in the deep and gobble up every other fish in sight. They can grow to be 18 inches long, live three days out of water and, if the need arises, walk short distances on their extended fins.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1998
The hunting season for migratory Canada geese again will be closed in Maryland and the Atlantic Flyway this fall, but according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, a reopening of the season is a possibility in 1999.The season was closed by the USFWS and the state in 1995 to allow the breeding population to recover from over-hunting and several successive years of poor breeding conditions in northeastern Canada."I think we have done the right things, and the population is showing signs of recovery," said Jerry Serie, Atlantic Flyway representative for USFWS.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1996
Final revisions to regulations for the 1996-1997 waterfowl hunting seasons are complete, and Maryland has chosen a conservative four-duck daily limit and lengthened the season for canvasbacks.DNR also has elected to experiment with a winter season for resident Canada geese and hold a youth waterfowl hunt on Nov. 2.DNR secretary John R. Griffin said the season dates and limits were finalized after evaluating public testimony at a series of four waterfowl meetings held around the state.A record fall flight of ducks could have allowed five ducks per day over a 50-day season under guidelines formed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | August 10, 1995
When the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said last week that it would close the hunting season for migratory Canada geese for at least one year starting this fall, hunters, outfitters and biologists said it could be beneficial to the goose population -- so long as the closure was throughout the Atlantic Flyway.The USFWS closure is intended to cover the American states in the territory, and now Canada will follow suit with a ban on hunting in areas crucial to Maryland's migratory population of Canada geese.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | August 16, 1994
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that the continental population of Canada geese is up 14 percent from last year, and the segment of that population that uses the Atlantic Flyway is up 7 percent.One might assume those are encouraging signs for Maryland hunters, whose seasons and bag limits have been declining since the late 1980s.But the situation is not quite what it might seem.William F. Harvey, of the Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Division, said last week that while the adult population is up a little, the number of juveniles flying south this fall will be disappointing.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1998
Maryland's Wildlife Division has completed its Midwinter Waterfowl Survey, and Department of Natural Resources officials said yesterday the results were encouraging in light of the warm weather of the past few months."
NEWS
By Paul Rogers and Paul Rogers,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 11, 1992
SANTA CRUZ, Calif. -- A unique project started in Santa Cruz 17 years ago to increase California's dwindling population of peregrine falcons has made so much progress that researchers will stop breeding the birds after the spring.In what environmentalists are calling an encouraging success story similar to the recovery of the California gray whale, scientists at the Predatory Bird Research Group on the University of California, Santa Cruz campus say peregrines don't need their help to reproduce anymore.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | August 26, 1999
A limited January hunting season for migratory Canada geese came closer to approval yesterday after being endorsed by waterfowl biologists and the state's Wildlife Advisory Commission.Michael Slattery, director of DNR's Wildife and Heritage Division, said the advisory commission voted 7-2 in favor of opening the season, which has been closed since 1995.The proposal to lift Maryland's ban on shooting migratory Canada geese was forwarded to the secretary of the Department of Natural Resorces yesterday.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1999
Maryland's midwinter count of waterfowl showed substantial increases over last year in numbers of several duck species and the migrant population of Canada geese, which registered the highest numbers since 1995."
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1998
After a pair of public meetings last month, DNR has finalized its waterfowl hunting seasons and bag limits for 1998-99 and submitted them to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for approval.Among the significant changes submitted are a longer October split in the duck season and more days open for canvasbacks later in the season.The October split for ducks will run Oct. 10-17, including two Saturdays.Canvasbacks will be open to hunting during the third split of the season, Dec. 14-Jan. 20."
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1998
The peregrine falcon will be removed from the endangered species list, according to a proposal to be announced today by Bruce Babbitt, secretary of the Department of the Interior."
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1998
The hunting season for migratory Canada geese again will be closed in Maryland and the Atlantic Flyway this fall, but according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, a reopening of the season is a possibility in 1999.The season was closed by the USFWS and the state in 1995 to allow the breeding population to recover from over-hunting and several successive years of poor breeding conditions in northeastern Canada."I think we have done the right things, and the population is showing signs of recovery," said Jerry Serie, Atlantic Flyway representative for USFWS.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1998
State waterfowl hunters, who again this year will be barred from hunting migratory Canada geese, will have an opportunity to participate in an experimental season for blue-winged or green-winged teal.The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the state's Department of Natural Resources will allow the special teal season from Sept. 12 to 22 (excluding Sunday) in areas of the state east of I-95. The bag limit will be four per day, singly or in aggregate.Shooting hours will be sunrise to sunset.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | April 2, 1995
Each year, the piping plover makes its way back to pockets of shoreline along Maryland's Atlantic Coast, where the small, stocky bird nests on the beach.Since 1986, the piping plover has been listed as a threatened species. and again public access to certain state and federal lands at the shore will be restricted during the bird's nesting season.At Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge, beach closures will be in effect through Aug. 31, including the lower 2.5 miles of Assateague Island, the Wild Beach area toward the northern end of the island and refuge lands on Assawoman and Metompkin islands.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Eastern Shore Bureau of The Sun | June 14, 1995
STEVENSVILLE -- Dave Brinker could be humming that old Drifters tune, "Up on the Roof."The ornithologist is on the roof of Thompson Creek Mall hard by U.S. 50 on Kent Island. Not humming, though -- counting least tern eggs and chicks. Overhead, the annoyed parents are wheeling and chittering, their family life temporarily disturbed."It's the closest thing to barren sand they can find," Mr. Brinker said as he and an assistant walked carefully along the white-graveled roof, looking at the rocks and under all the heating and air-conditioning compressors and ducts.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1998
Maryland's Wildlife Division has completed its Midwinter Waterfowl Survey, and Department of Natural Resources officials said yesterday the results were encouraging in light of the warm weather of the past few months."
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1997
For most of the previous hour, Trapper, a young black labrador, had been roaming 20 yards ahead, edging into brush piles and running game trails, nose to the ground, tail upright, delighting in the mixture of smells and woodland mysteries.A mist left behind from an overnight rain hung under the low clouds of early morning, and even to human senses the woods smelled fresh. Fox and deer tracks were clearly defined in the soft ground.A yearling deer broke from cover in a bramble, and Trapper flinched, froze and then howled and started to give chase to the white-tail bounding away through heavy brush.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.