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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | July 6, 1997
Preliminary estimates from the annual U.S.-Canadian survey of the nesting grounds for the Atlantic Flyway population of migratory Canada geese again are encouraging, with breeding pairs up significantly over last year."
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 10, 2005
LONDON - Long before bombings ripped through London on Thursday, Britain had become a breeding ground for hate, fed by a militant version of Islam. For two years, extremists like Sheik Omar Bakri Mohammed, a 47-year-old Syrian-born cleric, have played to ever-larger crowds, calling for holy war against Britain and exhorting young Muslim men to join the insurgency in Iraq. In a newspaper interview last April, he warned that "a very well-organized" London-based group, al-Qaida Europe, was "on the verge of launching a big operation" here.
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SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1999
Waterfowl managers in Midwestern and Southern states and north-central Canada have a perplexing problem -- too many lesser snow and Ross' geese. So many of them, in fact, they are eating themselves and other migratory species out of summer tundra habitat.Over the past three decades, the number of "light" geese in the mid-continent population has grown from 800,000 birds to more than 3 million.Increased agricultural and refuge development along the flyways through the Midwest and South have provided light geese with ample forage during their annual migrations, and the population has risen dramatically as a result.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2004
WASHINGTON - Ismail Selim Elbarasse, who is accused by federal officials of helping to manage the finances of the radical Muslim group Hamas, worked for 14 years as an accountant at a Saudi school in the Washington suburbs that has been criticized as a breeding ground for Islamic extremism. Officials at Islamic Saudi Academy in Northern Virginia said yesterday that Elbarasse - who was stopped with his family near the Bay Bridge on Friday after officers spotted his wife videotaping from their car - was "terminated" from the school in 1998, the year he was jailed for refusing to cooperate with a federal investigation into Hamas' finances.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | August 10, 1995
When the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said last week that it would close the hunting season for migratory Canada geese for at least one year starting this fall, hunters, outfitters and biologists said it could be beneficial to the goose population -- so long as the closure was throughout the Atlantic Flyway.The USFWS closure is intended to cover the American states in the territory, and now Canada will follow suit with a ban on hunting in areas crucial to Maryland's migratory population of Canada geese.
NEWS
March 22, 1993
For many Marylanders, our state bird should rightly be the Canada goose, a majestic, graceful symbol of the Chesapeake Bay and the Land of Pleasant Living despite its foreign name. The graceful, fluid V-flight of the long-necked honkers is one of the most thrilling sights in nature. (The official Baltimore oriole is not a distinct species, is little seen here, and its only Maryland connection is a shared plumage with the Calvert clan.)Sadly, the numbers of Canada geese in this area have been declining for nearly a decade.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | August 16, 1994
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that the continental population of Canada geese is up 14 percent from last year, and the segment of that population that uses the Atlantic Flyway is up 7 percent.One might assume those are encouraging signs for Maryland hunters, whose seasons and bag limits have been declining since the late 1980s.But the situation is not quite what it might seem.William F. Harvey, of the Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Division, said last week that while the adult population is up a little, the number of juveniles flying south this fall will be disappointing.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2000
TUCKAHOE STATE PARK - Snow geese, once on the verge of extinction, have become such a nuisance that Maryland and Delaware have expanded their hunting seasons for the birds, established reciprocal hunting license agreements and increased bag limits. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is preparing an environmental impact statement for nontraditional methods of holding down the population of the beautiful white birds with black wing tips, including a spring hunting season, allowing hunters to use electronic calls and authorizing longer shooting hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2002
The Snow Geese, by William Fiennes. Random House. 288 pages. $24.95. This is one man's story about finding his way home. No, wait, it's about how birds find their way home. Truth be told, it's both: the story of how an Englishman follows geese from their winter sanctuary in southern Texas to their breeding grounds in northern Canada and in the process discovers what Dorothy said on the silver screen more than 60 years ago - there's no place like home. William Fiennes' first book, is an unusual breed, a part-travelogue, part-bird book that almost works to perfection.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | October 31, 1990
For a month and a half, hunters have been watching flights of Canada geese coming into Maryland, and with the opening of the hunting season for these waterfowl still two weeks away, there may be a stirring in the minds of some that perhaps the population of Canadas is strongly on the rebound.Larry Hindman, waterfowl management supervisor for the Department of Natural Resources' Forest, Park and Wildlife Service, said Monday that probably is not the case. Rather, Hindman said, unseasonably cold temperatures to the north probably have forced the Canadas south early.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2002
The Snow Geese, by William Fiennes. Random House. 288 pages. $24.95. This is one man's story about finding his way home. No, wait, it's about how birds find their way home. Truth be told, it's both: the story of how an Englishman follows geese from their winter sanctuary in southern Texas to their breeding grounds in northern Canada and in the process discovers what Dorothy said on the silver screen more than 60 years ago - there's no place like home. William Fiennes' first book, is an unusual breed, a part-travelogue, part-bird book that almost works to perfection.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2000
TUCKAHOE STATE PARK - Snow geese, once on the verge of extinction, have become such a nuisance that Maryland and Delaware have expanded their hunting seasons for the birds, established reciprocal hunting license agreements and increased bag limits. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is preparing an environmental impact statement for nontraditional methods of holding down the population of the beautiful white birds with black wing tips, including a spring hunting season, allowing hunters to use electronic calls and authorizing longer shooting hours.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | August 26, 1999
SOMEWHERE OUT there -- in Frederick County? in Washington County? in hiding, and in justifiable embarrassment? -- is state Sen. Alex Mooney, who isn't returning his telephone calls these days, perhaps because he's just begun to weigh the impact of words.Two weeks ago, Mooney sent a fund-raising letter to conservative Republicans, asking for "at least $500" each to defend his Senate seat against "militant homosexuals targeting me for defeat."Two days ago, on Mooney's home turf, members of the Ku Klux Klan sent out letters of their own attacking gays.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1999
Waterfowl managers in Midwestern and Southern states and north-central Canada have a perplexing problem -- too many lesser snow and Ross' geese. So many of them, in fact, they are eating themselves and other migratory species out of summer tundra habitat.Over the past three decades, the number of "light" geese in the mid-continent population has grown from 800,000 birds to more than 3 million.Increased agricultural and refuge development along the flyways through the Midwest and South have provided light geese with ample forage during their annual migrations, and the population has risen dramatically as a result.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1998
The hunting season for migratory Canada geese again will be closed in Maryland and the Atlantic Flyway this fall, but according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, a reopening of the season is a possibility in 1999.The season was closed by the USFWS and the state in 1995 to allow the breeding population to recover from over-hunting and several successive years of poor breeding conditions in northeastern Canada."I think we have done the right things, and the population is showing signs of recovery," said Jerry Serie, Atlantic Flyway representative for USFWS.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1998
For several years, the sounds of migrating geese have been mostly missing from the early mornings in late winter along my small portion of the Western Shore. Over a period of several days last week, however, there was a clamor shortly after dawn as successive flights of Canada geese began their journeys north.As groups of a dozen or two rose through the altitudes, calling among themselves and fitting into the slipstreams built by the familiar v formation of their flights, the pieces of their sometimes puzzling life cycle again began to fit together.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1998
The hunting season for migratory Canada geese again will be closed in Maryland and the Atlantic Flyway this fall, but according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, a reopening of the season is a possibility in 1999.The season was closed by the USFWS and the state in 1995 to allow the breeding population to recover from over-hunting and several successive years of poor breeding conditions in northeastern Canada."I think we have done the right things, and the population is showing signs of recovery," said Jerry Serie, Atlantic Flyway representative for USFWS.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | March 5, 1998
For several years, the sounds of migrating geese have been mostly missing from the early mornings in late winter along my small portion of the Western Shore. Over a period of several days last week, however, there was a clamor shortly after dawn as successive flights of Canada geese began their journeys north.As groups of a dozen or two rose through the altitudes, calling among themselves and fitting into the slipstreams built by the familiar v formation of their flights, the pieces of their sometimes puzzling life cycle again began to fit together.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | July 6, 1997
Preliminary estimates from the annual U.S.-Canadian survey of the nesting grounds for the Atlantic Flyway population of migratory Canada geese again are encouraging, with breeding pairs up significantly over last year."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 15, 1996
The Canada goose, once a solely migratory bird whose majestic V-formations filled the autumn skies, in recent years has become an all-too-familiar year-round resident of Middle Atlantic suburbs and farms, including those in Maryland.As the goose population has doubled every five years of late, the big honkers have become pests in the eyes of many people.But there is another, older image of the handsome waterfowl with the jet-black head and neck, white chinstrap, fat, cream-colored body and broad brown back.
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