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Breathing Problems

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HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | February 13, 2012
Yale medical researchers have found that C-sections may be causing breathing problems in preemies who are small for their age. The researcher reviewed eight years of birth certificates and found that babies delivered by a C-section before 34 weeks of pregnancy who were small for gestational age had higher odds of developing respiratory distress syndrome than babies born vaginally. The study was recently presented at the 32nd Annual Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM)
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HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | February 13, 2012
Yale medical researchers have found that C-sections may be causing breathing problems in preemies who are small for their age. The researcher reviewed eight years of birth certificates and found that babies delivered by a C-section before 34 weeks of pregnancy who were small for gestational age had higher odds of developing respiratory distress syndrome than babies born vaginally. The study was recently presented at the 32nd Annual Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM)
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NEWS
June 25, 1998
Air pollution in the Baltimore area is expected to reach seriously unhealthy levels today. The forecast calls for smog particles to reach more than 125 parts per billion, high enough to violate a federal anti-pollution law, make some people feel ill and pose health risks for children, the elderly and people with heart and breathing problems.Today's forecast calls for 90-degree, sunny weather to combine with pollution from cars, smokestacks and lawn mowers, creating ground-level ozone, or smog.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | May 12, 2006
The only real health problem that 3-year-old Nicholas Salter had was the occasional sore throat. Sometimes, it hurt so much that it was hard to swallow, which cut back on his appetite. And there was one more issue: "He'd snore so loudly you could hear him in his room from the top of the steps," said his mother, Jackie Salter. After two cases of strep throat within a few weeks, doctors recommended a sleep study: hooking Nicholas up to monitors overnight to make sure he was breathing properly and getting enough rest.
NEWS
July 2, 2000
A recent study reported that Anne Arundel County has the worst air pollution in the state and the 11th worst in the nation. The study, by the American Lung Association, flunked Anne Arundel and the state. That's bad news, particularly for the people suffering from such breathing problems such as asthma. And things will get worse in the summer when ozone levels are highest. We can't just hold our breath and hope this problem goes away. What should citizens and government do to clean up this filthy air?
NEWS
July 1, 2001
Watch for signs of heat stroke, which is life-threatening and can occur with any outdoor activity in extreme heat. Heat stroke means the body's temperature-control system, which causes perspiration to cool the body, stops working, causing a person's temperature to rise. Brain damage or death can occur. Symptoms: Hot, red and dry skin; changes in consciousness; rapid, weak pulse; and rapid, shallow breathing. What to do: Call 911. Move the person to a cooler place, and make sure he or she is kept lying down.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | March 5, 1995
For many people, smog causes wheezing, chest pain and lung inflammation at concentrations well below what is now deemed safe, says a new federal report.The finding could mean that people in the Baltimore region breathed unhealthful air as many as 79 days last summer, rather than the 11 reported by the state Department of the Environment.In a review of some 3,000 scientific studies, the Environmental Protection Agency established that repeated or long-term exposure to smog at levels 33 percent below the federal standard can impair breathing and cause potentially harmful changes in the lungs.
TOPIC
By Candus Thomson | August 8, 1999
MONTGOMERY COUNTY prosecutors used modern medical science to prove Garrett Eldred Wilson killed his infant son for $150,000 in insurance money.But the foundation of Wilson's July 29 conviction was built 27 years ago in a Baltimore courtroom by a brilliant but eccentric federal judge, a dogged lawyer and two young doctors.The sensational murder trial of Martha Woods in 1972 established a legal precedent and launched the careers of national experts on sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The judge in the case allowed the prosecutor to introduce evidence showing a deadly pattern to Woods' behavior.
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 26, 2005
VATICAN CITY - Pope John Paul II was resting comfortably and breathing without the help of a respirator yesterday, the day after doctors at a Rome hospital performed a tracheotomy to relieve a recurring respiratory problem. Papal spokesman Joaquin Navarro-Valls said the pope's heart and circulatory system remain sound and there was no sign of pneumonia, a major worry for elderly patients in poor health. The tracheotomy involves opening a small passage through the neck to the windpipe and inserting a tube so air can flow directly to the lungs.
NEWS
By Maria Archangelo and Maria Archangelo,Staff writer | May 19, 1991
Testimony is set to begin this morning in a Westminster doctor's appeal of a decision by the state's malpractice court that he didn't do enough to save a baby boy who died shortly after birth in 1986.InJuly, a three-member Maryland Health Arbitration Board found Dr. Karl Green negligent in his care of Brett Morris, the infant son of Robert and Barbara Morris of Westminster. The panel awarded the Morrises $550,000 in damages.Carroll County General Hospital also was named in the original suit, but was not found liable by the malpractice panel.
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 26, 2005
VATICAN CITY - Pope John Paul II was resting comfortably and breathing without the help of a respirator yesterday, the day after doctors at a Rome hospital performed a tracheotomy to relieve a recurring respiratory problem. Papal spokesman Joaquin Navarro-Valls said the pope's heart and circulatory system remain sound and there was no sign of pneumonia, a major worry for elderly patients in poor health. The tracheotomy involves opening a small passage through the neck to the windpipe and inserting a tube so air can flow directly to the lungs.
NEWS
By Maria de Cristofaro and Sebastian Rotella and Maria de Cristofaro and Sebastian Rotella,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 7, 2005
ROME - A feeble but determined-looking Pope John Paul II appeared in public yesterday for the first time since he was hospitalized last week, waving from his hospital window and giving a brief blessing in a hoarse, faint voice. The 84-year-old pontiff's 10-minute appearance reassured well-wishers that he is recovering from breathing difficulties that caused doctors to rush him to Gemelli Hospital on Tuesday night. But his frailty was reflected by the fact that he did not deliver his traditional Sunday message and Angelus.
NEWS
July 1, 2001
Watch for signs of heat stroke, which is life-threatening and can occur with any outdoor activity in extreme heat. Heat stroke means the body's temperature-control system, which causes perspiration to cool the body, stops working, causing a person's temperature to rise. Brain damage or death can occur. Symptoms: Hot, red and dry skin; changes in consciousness; rapid, weak pulse; and rapid, shallow breathing. What to do: Call 911. Move the person to a cooler place, and make sure he or she is kept lying down.
NEWS
July 2, 2000
A recent study reported that Anne Arundel County has the worst air pollution in the state and the 11th worst in the nation. The study, by the American Lung Association, flunked Anne Arundel and the state. That's bad news, particularly for the people suffering from such breathing problems such as asthma. And things will get worse in the summer when ozone levels are highest. We can't just hold our breath and hope this problem goes away. What should citizens and government do to clean up this filthy air?
TOPIC
By Candus Thomson | August 8, 1999
MONTGOMERY COUNTY prosecutors used modern medical science to prove Garrett Eldred Wilson killed his infant son for $150,000 in insurance money.But the foundation of Wilson's July 29 conviction was built 27 years ago in a Baltimore courtroom by a brilliant but eccentric federal judge, a dogged lawyer and two young doctors.The sensational murder trial of Martha Woods in 1972 established a legal precedent and launched the careers of national experts on sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The judge in the case allowed the prosecutor to introduce evidence showing a deadly pattern to Woods' behavior.
NEWS
June 25, 1998
Air pollution in the Baltimore area is expected to reach seriously unhealthy levels today. The forecast calls for smog particles to reach more than 125 parts per billion, high enough to violate a federal anti-pollution law, make some people feel ill and pose health risks for children, the elderly and people with heart and breathing problems.Today's forecast calls for 90-degree, sunny weather to combine with pollution from cars, smokestacks and lawn mowers, creating ground-level ozone, or smog.
NEWS
By Maria Archangelo and Maria Archangelo,Staff writer | May 26, 1991
Four-and-a-half days of medical testimony in a county pediatrician'sappeal against a finding of malpractice ended abruptly Friday afternoon because of technical difficulties.Testimony is set to begin again at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday in Dr. Karl Green's appeal of a decision bythe Maryland Health Arbitration Board in Sykesville that found the doctor negligent in his care of the infant son of Robert and Barbara Morris of Westminster.About 30 minutes into the videotaped cross-examination of a Canadian pediatrician, the picture became jumbled and was difficult for the jury to see clearly.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | May 12, 2006
The only real health problem that 3-year-old Nicholas Salter had was the occasional sore throat. Sometimes, it hurt so much that it was hard to swallow, which cut back on his appetite. And there was one more issue: "He'd snore so loudly you could hear him in his room from the top of the steps," said his mother, Jackie Salter. After two cases of strep throat within a few weeks, doctors recommended a sleep study: hooking Nicholas up to monitors overnight to make sure he was breathing properly and getting enough rest.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | March 5, 1995
For many people, smog causes wheezing, chest pain and lung inflammation at concentrations well below what is now deemed safe, says a new federal report.The finding could mean that people in the Baltimore region breathed unhealthful air as many as 79 days last summer, rather than the 11 reported by the state Department of the Environment.In a review of some 3,000 scientific studies, the Environmental Protection Agency established that repeated or long-term exposure to smog at levels 33 percent below the federal standard can impair breathing and cause potentially harmful changes in the lungs.
NEWS
By Maria Archangelo and Maria Archangelo,Staff writer | May 26, 1991
Four-and-a-half days of medical testimony in a county pediatrician'sappeal against a finding of malpractice ended abruptly Friday afternoon because of technical difficulties.Testimony is set to begin again at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday in Dr. Karl Green's appeal of a decision bythe Maryland Health Arbitration Board in Sykesville that found the doctor negligent in his care of the infant son of Robert and Barbara Morris of Westminster.About 30 minutes into the videotaped cross-examination of a Canadian pediatrician, the picture became jumbled and was difficult for the jury to see clearly.
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