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NEWS
November 12, 2003
ACS breakfast with elected officials to be held Tuesday The Association of Community Services (ACS) will hold its Elected Officials' Breakfast at 7:30 a.m. Tuesday at The Meeting House, 5885 Robert Oliver Place, Columbia. People directly served by ACS members will talk about the impact of current and proposed cuts on their lives with Howard County Council and state delegation representatives. The breakfast is an opportunity for directors and staff members of human service agencies and others to discuss the delivery of services in the county.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Some women at high risk for breast cancer because of an inherited gene mutation, including actress Angelina Jolie, are choosing to have preventive double mastectomies. Other women who have cancer in one breast are asking their doctors to remove the other breast removed out of caution. Whatever the reason, more women are having both breasts removed in response to cancer or a cancer threat. Dr. David Euhus, chief of breast surgery in the division of surgical oncology at Johns Hopkins Hospital, explains the trend and what happens after.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | February 1, 2008
Dr. Edward F. Lewison, an internationally recognized surgeon and authority on breast cancer who was a founder and former chief of the Johns Hopkins Hospital's Breast Clinic, died Monday of heart failure at his home in the Winthrop House condominiums on North Charles Street. He was 94. "Ed was a model practicing surgeon who had a special interest in breast cancer. He was always knowledgeable in new developments and treatments," said Dr. Richard S. Ross, former dean of the Hopkins School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | June 18, 2009
William H. Bouchelle, a retired Baltimore surgeon and a sports fan, died of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease, June 11 at his Cockeysville home. He was 63. Dr. Bouchelle, the son of a real estate executive and homemaker, was born in Portland, Ore., and was raised in Elkton and Wilmington, Del. After graduating from John Dickinson High School in Wilmington in 1963, he earned his bachelor's degree from the Johns Hopkins University in 1967. He earned his medical degree and completed an internship at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Some women at high risk for breast cancer because of an inherited gene mutation, including actress Angelina Jolie, are choosing to have preventive double mastectomies. Other women who have cancer in one breast are asking their doctors to remove the other breast removed out of caution. Whatever the reason, more women are having both breasts removed in response to cancer or a cancer threat. Dr. David Euhus, chief of breast surgery in the division of surgical oncology at Johns Hopkins Hospital, explains the trend and what happens after.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | November 19, 1996
BOSTON -- From time to time, when I hear yet another decision from the health-care honchos of America, a small sentence forms above my head like a balloon in a cartoon: Who Are These People?Do HMOs deliberately recruit their policy-makers from some small subset of Americans who have no -- repeat, no -- experience with illness? Do managed-care headhunters actively search for folks whose primary people-skill is the skill to block out people while focusing on numbers?I burst this balloon publicly after reports that the same managed-care folks that brought us drive-thru deliveries topped that public-relations disaster with a new feat: drive-thru mastectomies.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1996
Driven by insurance rules and new attitudes toward recovery, Maryland hospitals are limiting most mastectomy patients to an overnight stay or an outpatient routine that has women going home hours after surgery.A decade ago, women were hospitalized for up to a week after having a cancerous breast removed. It was a time for nurses to check drains and dressings, and for patients to begin recovering from an operation that can be painful and disfiguring.But in an era when hospitals do outpatient hernia repairs and discharge patients a day after gallbladder operations, they are preparing breast cancer patients to recover at home.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1997
When Nancy Slaterbeck came out of anesthesia after her cancerous left breast was amputated at Johns Hopkins Hospital three weeks ago, all she wanted to do was sleep and get rid of the "unbearable" pain in her arm.But the main concern for some members of the recovery room staff seemed to be getting rid of her, the 51-year-old Towson woman told a Maryland Senate committee yesterday."
FEATURES
By Michael Blowen and Michael Blowen,Boston Globe | March 12, 1995
Remember Priscilla Goodbody?She was the fictional, invisible network censor trotted out every time Johnny Carson wanted to take a jab at the prim and proper Broadcast Standards and Practices office at NBC. She was a humorless schoolmarm type who objected to the word "toilet," demanded that married men and women on TV inhabit separate beds, if not separate rooms, and was constantly on Mr. Carson's case for his legendary double-entendres. She even wanted to censor his devilish smirk.Things change.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 5, 1992
Provocative new research suggesting that the timing of breast cancer surgery in the menstrual cycle can dramatically affect its success has ignited a fierce debate among cancer specialists.Recent studies have found that pre-menopausal women newly diagnosed with breast cancer survive far longer when the operation to remove the tumor is performed during the second half of their monthly cycle."It seems that there's something biochemical that happens when surgery is performed late in the menstrual cycle that increases the probability that tumor cells that have spread beyond the breast will die," said Dr. Peter Paul Rosen, a pathologist at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, who directed one of the new studies.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | February 1, 2008
Dr. Edward F. Lewison, an internationally recognized surgeon and authority on breast cancer who was a founder and former chief of the Johns Hopkins Hospital's Breast Clinic, died Monday of heart failure at his home in the Winthrop House condominiums on North Charles Street. He was 94. "Ed was a model practicing surgeon who had a special interest in breast cancer. He was always knowledgeable in new developments and treatments," said Dr. Richard S. Ross, former dean of the Hopkins School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Scott Allen and Scott Allen,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 16, 2005
Some women in their 40s who undergo surgery to treat breast cancer may actually increase their risk of a near-term relapse, according to a controversial Harvard Medical School study that suggests cancer surgery itself may "awaken" dormant tumor cells in other parts of the body. The Harvard researchers found that, for about 20 percent of women in their 40s whose breast cancer has spread to their lymph nodes, cancer surgery seems to cause tiny tumors in other parts of their body to grow.
NEWS
November 12, 2003
ACS breakfast with elected officials to be held Tuesday The Association of Community Services (ACS) will hold its Elected Officials' Breakfast at 7:30 a.m. Tuesday at The Meeting House, 5885 Robert Oliver Place, Columbia. People directly served by ACS members will talk about the impact of current and proposed cuts on their lives with Howard County Council and state delegation representatives. The breakfast is an opportunity for directors and staff members of human service agencies and others to discuss the delivery of services in the county.
FEATURES
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2001
Dressed sharply in her green Army uniform, Bonnita Wilson charged through life. A wife and mother of three, she slept only four or five hours a night, pumped 65 push-ups in two minutes and earned early promotions. She was a fast-rising star in the U.S. Army Nurse Corps. So when Major Wilson was diagnosed with aggressive breast cancer just before she was to start graduate work at the University of Maryland School of Nursing two years ago, she did the only thing she knew how: She kept going and doing her best.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1997
When Nancy Slaterbeck came out of anesthesia after her cancerous left breast was amputated at Johns Hopkins Hospital three weeks ago, all she wanted to do was sleep and get rid of the "unbearable" pain in her arm.But the main concern for some members of the recovery room staff seemed to be getting rid of her, the 51-year-old Towson woman told a Maryland Senate committee yesterday."
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | November 19, 1996
BOSTON -- From time to time, when I hear yet another decision from the health-care honchos of America, a small sentence forms above my head like a balloon in a cartoon: Who Are These People?Do HMOs deliberately recruit their policy-makers from some small subset of Americans who have no -- repeat, no -- experience with illness? Do managed-care headhunters actively search for folks whose primary people-skill is the skill to block out people while focusing on numbers?I burst this balloon publicly after reports that the same managed-care folks that brought us drive-thru deliveries topped that public-relations disaster with a new feat: drive-thru mastectomies.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | June 18, 2009
William H. Bouchelle, a retired Baltimore surgeon and a sports fan, died of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease, June 11 at his Cockeysville home. He was 63. Dr. Bouchelle, the son of a real estate executive and homemaker, was born in Portland, Ore., and was raised in Elkton and Wilmington, Del. After graduating from John Dickinson High School in Wilmington in 1963, he earned his bachelor's degree from the Johns Hopkins University in 1967. He earned his medical degree and completed an internship at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Scott Allen and Scott Allen,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 16, 2005
Some women in their 40s who undergo surgery to treat breast cancer may actually increase their risk of a near-term relapse, according to a controversial Harvard Medical School study that suggests cancer surgery itself may "awaken" dormant tumor cells in other parts of the body. The Harvard researchers found that, for about 20 percent of women in their 40s whose breast cancer has spread to their lymph nodes, cancer surgery seems to cause tiny tumors in other parts of their body to grow.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1996
Driven by insurance rules and new attitudes toward recovery, Maryland hospitals are limiting most mastectomy patients to an overnight stay or an outpatient routine that has women going home hours after surgery.A decade ago, women were hospitalized for up to a week after having a cancerous breast removed. It was a time for nurses to check drains and dressings, and for patients to begin recovering from an operation that can be painful and disfiguring.But in an era when hospitals do outpatient hernia repairs and discharge patients a day after gallbladder operations, they are preparing breast cancer patients to recover at home.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 5, 1992
Provocative new research suggesting that the timing of breast cancer surgery in the menstrual cycle can dramatically affect its success has ignited a fierce debate among cancer specialists.Recent studies have found that pre-menopausal women newly diagnosed with breast cancer survive far longer when the operation to remove the tumor is performed during the second half of their monthly cycle."It seems that there's something biochemical that happens when surgery is performed late in the menstrual cycle that increases the probability that tumor cells that have spread beyond the breast will die," said Dr. Peter Paul Rosen, a pathologist at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, who directed one of the new studies.
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