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Breast Self Examination

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By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1998
Dr. Albert R. Milan, a noted Baltimore obstetrician-gynecologist, died of complications of a stroke Monday at Manor Care Ruxton. The Hillendale resident was 78.He practiced in Baltimore for 46 years and retired in 1996.Dr. Milan was a proponent of breast self-examination to detect cancer as early as possible. His 1980 book, "Breast Self-Examination," was a lavishly illustrated guidebook with techniques that were easy to learn and practice."The cruel realities of life," he wrote, "teach us that breast cancer is among the greatest killers of women.
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NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2010
Women are between a rock and a hard place, if you will excuse the expression, when trying to decide when, and how often, to have a screening mammogram. Start at 40? Or 50? Once a year? Every two years? Breast cancer strikes one in seven women. How do you know whether you are at risk? And when did they take breast self-exams off the to-do list? Do mammograms save lives? Or do they find tumors that would never have required treatment, putting women through the misery of surgery, chemotherapy or radiation?
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FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe | December 24, 1991
Q: When should adolescent girls begin breast self-examination?A: The major purpose of breast self-examination is to identify changes or new lumps in the breast that could signal the onset of breast cancer. Presumably, monthly exams on a regular basis will identify cancers at their earliest stage when they are most treatable.However, the chances of a teen-age girl getting breast cancer are extremely low, so there is no exact age at which a young woman must start. Rather, we advocate teaching young women to examine their breast for four reasons.
NEWS
By Fay Lande | May 1, 2003
Caryn Andrews will give a presentation about breast health awareness next week to about 150 senior girls at River Hill High School. The program also is aimed at reaching their mothers. "If one of them takes it home and gives her mother a shower card [with instructions for breast self-examination] and one lump is found and that lump is cancer, it will be worth it," said Andrews, a doctoral candidate at the University of Maryland School of Nursing. "It will be worth it if that lump is found five years from now."
NEWS
By Fay Lande | May 1, 2003
Caryn Andrews will give a presentation about breast health awareness next week to about 150 senior girls at River Hill High School. The program also is aimed at reaching their mothers. "If one of them takes it home and gives her mother a shower card [with instructions for breast self-examination] and one lump is found and that lump is cancer, it will be worth it," said Andrews, a doctoral candidate at the University of Maryland School of Nursing. "It will be worth it if that lump is found five years from now."
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff Writer | March 7, 1995
There was a moment of silence in the Overlea High School auditorium as Barbara Samuelson told 150 young women how she discovered cancer in her right breast.A mother of two young children, Mrs. Samuelson was 32 when she felt a suspicious breast lump while taking a shower. She eventually lost both breasts after her cancer was diagnosed, but the disease has not recurred. She will celebrate her 53rd birthday this month."Every cancer is different," she told the girls. "Every case is different.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | November 10, 1992
American women need to take seriously the warning from the American Cancer Society that one in nine of us will develop breast cancer. That's 175,000 new cases and an estimated 44,800 deaths each year.But there also is a group of conditions called Benign Breast Disorders, and while the word "benign" brings relief, we need to keep in mind a few things about this kind of breast disease.Q: What is the definition of Benign Breast Disorders (BBD)?A: This is a term which covers many conditions of the breast that are not malignant.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2010
Women are between a rock and a hard place, if you will excuse the expression, when trying to decide when, and how often, to have a screening mammogram. Start at 40? Or 50? Once a year? Every two years? Breast cancer strikes one in seven women. How do you know whether you are at risk? And when did they take breast self-exams off the to-do list? Do mammograms save lives? Or do they find tumors that would never have required treatment, putting women through the misery of surgery, chemotherapy or radiation?
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1996
To Judy Westphal, helping to create a mammography program for co-workers at North Arundel Hospital was "just doing a part of my job."It was taking care of family, explained the 54-year-old nurse. "We just felt like you need to look after your own family, and, of course, this was our work family."But to the Glen Burnie Business and Professional Women's Association, it was an effort that led them to name her Woman of the Year for 1996. She was selected for the award based on co-workers' nominations.
NEWS
October 1, 2000
The Women's Place at Carroll County General Hospital will recognize Breast Cancer Awareness Month during October with several programs designed to educate about the causes, prevention, detection and treatment of breast cancer. Scheduled activities include: "An Evening of Hope, Laughter and Positive Thinking" at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 11. Cost is $10. Cancer survivor Christine Clifford, a humorist and author, will encourage the use of humor in helping to deal with cancer and other chronic diseases.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1998
Dr. Albert R. Milan, a noted Baltimore obstetrician-gynecologist, died of complications of a stroke Monday at Manor Care Ruxton. The Hillendale resident was 78.He practiced in Baltimore for 46 years and retired in 1996.Dr. Milan was a proponent of breast self-examination to detect cancer as early as possible. His 1980 book, "Breast Self-Examination," was a lavishly illustrated guidebook with techniques that were easy to learn and practice."The cruel realities of life," he wrote, "teach us that breast cancer is among the greatest killers of women.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff Writer | March 7, 1995
There was a moment of silence in the Overlea High School auditorium as Barbara Samuelson told 150 young women how she discovered cancer in her right breast.A mother of two young children, Mrs. Samuelson was 32 when she felt a suspicious breast lump while taking a shower. She eventually lost both breasts after her cancer was diagnosed, but the disease has not recurred. She will celebrate her 53rd birthday this month."Every cancer is different," she told the girls. "Every case is different.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | November 10, 1992
American women need to take seriously the warning from the American Cancer Society that one in nine of us will develop breast cancer. That's 175,000 new cases and an estimated 44,800 deaths each year.But there also is a group of conditions called Benign Breast Disorders, and while the word "benign" brings relief, we need to keep in mind a few things about this kind of breast disease.Q: What is the definition of Benign Breast Disorders (BBD)?A: This is a term which covers many conditions of the breast that are not malignant.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe | December 24, 1991
Q: When should adolescent girls begin breast self-examination?A: The major purpose of breast self-examination is to identify changes or new lumps in the breast that could signal the onset of breast cancer. Presumably, monthly exams on a regular basis will identify cancers at their earliest stage when they are most treatable.However, the chances of a teen-age girl getting breast cancer are extremely low, so there is no exact age at which a young woman must start. Rather, we advocate teaching young women to examine their breast for four reasons.
FEATURES
By Judith Forman and Judith Forman,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1998
A historic new postage stamp making its debut today in the nation's capital has a familiar return address: the Maryland Institute, College of Art.The first issue of the U.S. Postal Service's Breast Cancer Postage Stamp will be celebrated today in a White House ceremony with first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and Postmaster General William Henderson serving as hosts. Also on hand will be the stamp's designer, Ethel Kessler, and its illustrator, Whitney Sherman, both 1971 graduates of the institute.
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