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Breast Reconstruction

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HEALTH
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
When Mary Casterline was diagnosed with invasive carcinoma of the breast in mid-April, she knew she was fortunate. Her cancer was very treatable and she had a lot of options for both treatment and beyond. Casterline's doctors explained that she had the choice between radiation and lumpectomy (removing just the tumor but preserving the breast) or a mastectomy (complete removal of the breast). If she opted for mastectomy, she could choose to reconstruct the breast, either with an implant or via free tissue transfer (also known as "tissue flap" or "trans flap")
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HEALTH
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
When Mary Casterline was diagnosed with invasive carcinoma of the breast in mid-April, she knew she was fortunate. Her cancer was very treatable and she had a lot of options for both treatment and beyond. Casterline's doctors explained that she had the choice between radiation and lumpectomy (removing just the tumor but preserving the breast) or a mastectomy (complete removal of the breast). If she opted for mastectomy, she could choose to reconstruct the breast, either with an implant or via free tissue transfer (also known as "tissue flap" or "trans flap")
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FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1995
It was April Fools' Day 1992, during a scholarly trip to California, when Walters Art Gallery curator Joaneath Spicer learned her breast cancer had recurred. She hung up the phone in a daze. "I remember going in the bathroon. And it's very satisfying to see that there is no sign -- to see that you are yourself."Over the next month as she prepared for a mastectomy, the promise of breast reconstruction helped Dr. Spicer preserve her belief that life would one day return to normal.Unlike many women facing the same choice, the curator was not deterred by ambivalence about whether breast reconstruction is a matter of sanity or vanity -- a debate that threatens to influence insurance coverage.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
Racking up the miles on her bike has become a not-so-secret addiction for Julie Lanahan, a healthy habit she never imagined she would hunger after. "You sort of crave it," said the breast cancer survivor, who will take part in Sunday's Iron Girl Columbia, an all-women's sprint triathlon that kicks off with a swim in Centennial Lake, followed by a bike ride and run on local roads. Organizers say 1,800 women have signed up and a crowd of 4,000 to 5,000 spectators is expected for the popular event in Ellicott City, which started in 2006 and draws whole families who turn out to cheer on the participants.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1995
Developed in 1981 by Atlanta plastic surgeon Carl Hartrampf, the TRAM-flap procedure for breast reconstruction tunnels tissue and muscle from the patient's abdomen beneath the skin to the chest to construct a new breast mound. Subsequent outpatient surgery creates a nipple and areola, the pigmented area around the nipple.The benefits of the TRAM-flap procedure (the acronym stands for transverse rectus abdominus muscle) include gaining a breast that feels and moves naturally and adjusts itself to the body's weight loss or weight gain.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | April 16, 2013
 Maryland has the second highest number of health mandates - or procedures and services insurers are required to cover in policies. Rhode Island is the state with the most number of mandates, according to research by the Council for Affordable Health Insurance. Some believe that mandates drive up the cost of health care. Maryland has 67 mandates while Rhode Island has 69. Idaho is the state with the least number of mandates at 13. The most popular mandates are mammography screening and the length of time a woman must stay in the hospital after giving birth.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 22, 2008
Breast cancer patients who had reconstructive surgery using implants immediately after mastectomies were twice as likely to develop infections as women who immediately had breast reconstruction using their own tissue, according to a study published yesterday. The article in Archives of Surgery, which examined the medical records of breast surgery patients at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis from mid-1999 to mid-2002, found that 50 of 949 patients got an infection at the surgical site within a year after surgery.
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 12, 2005
WASHINGTON - Pamela Dowd drove her 20-year-old motor home 2,500 miles from Boise, Idaho, to tell a government panel how her silicone breast implants led to health problems that have sapped her vitality and made her medically uninsurable. Terry Heide took time off from her Pentagon job to urge just as forcefully that women be allowed to make their own decisions about the risks and benefits of silicone gel implants, which many believe have a more natural look and feel than the available saline-filled ones.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Clare Fischer, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
After undergoing treatment for breast cancer , Lillie Shockney, the administrative director of the Johns Hopkins Breast Center, had nipple reconstruction - twice. Despite the many shades of patients' skin tone, "The color choices for doing it in the hospital setting were beige, dark brown and the most common color, called 'salmon,' " Shockney said. She chose salmon and the result, she said, "looked like two pancakes. " Then she saw the work of Vinnie Myers on one of her own patients and went to him. When the procedure was finished, she looked in the mirror and burst into tears.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | April 20, 1993
A Glen Burnie pharmacy begins offering today a product for mastectomy patients that its manufacturer says is "the wave of the future."The product, the Discrene breast form, attaches directly to the body, making it more lifelike, said Tracy Julius, a sales representative for Coloplast, Inc."You can swim in it and shower in it," she said. "And you can wear regular bras, swimsuits and lingerie."From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. today and tomorrow, Ms. Julius and Michele Owens, a pharmacist and certified fitter at Empire Pharmacy, will hold presentations and answer questions on the product at the pharmacy on Hospital Drive, across from North Arundel Hospital.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | April 16, 2013
 Maryland has the second highest number of health mandates - or procedures and services insurers are required to cover in policies. Rhode Island is the state with the most number of mandates, according to research by the Council for Affordable Health Insurance. Some believe that mandates drive up the cost of health care. Maryland has 67 mandates while Rhode Island has 69. Idaho is the state with the least number of mandates at 13. The most popular mandates are mammography screening and the length of time a woman must stay in the hospital after giving birth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Clare Fischer, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
After undergoing treatment for breast cancer , Lillie Shockney, the administrative director of the Johns Hopkins Breast Center, had nipple reconstruction - twice. Despite the many shades of patients' skin tone, "The color choices for doing it in the hospital setting were beige, dark brown and the most common color, called 'salmon,' " Shockney said. She chose salmon and the result, she said, "looked like two pancakes. " Then she saw the work of Vinnie Myers on one of her own patients and went to him. When the procedure was finished, she looked in the mirror and burst into tears.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 22, 2008
Breast cancer patients who had reconstructive surgery using implants immediately after mastectomies were twice as likely to develop infections as women who immediately had breast reconstruction using their own tissue, according to a study published yesterday. The article in Archives of Surgery, which examined the medical records of breast surgery patients at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis from mid-1999 to mid-2002, found that 50 of 949 patients got an infection at the surgical site within a year after surgery.
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 12, 2005
WASHINGTON - Pamela Dowd drove her 20-year-old motor home 2,500 miles from Boise, Idaho, to tell a government panel how her silicone breast implants led to health problems that have sapped her vitality and made her medically uninsurable. Terry Heide took time off from her Pentagon job to urge just as forcefully that women be allowed to make their own decisions about the risks and benefits of silicone gel implants, which many believe have a more natural look and feel than the available saline-filled ones.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1995
Developed in 1981 by Atlanta plastic surgeon Carl Hartrampf, the TRAM-flap procedure for breast reconstruction tunnels tissue and muscle from the patient's abdomen beneath the skin to the chest to construct a new breast mound. Subsequent outpatient surgery creates a nipple and areola, the pigmented area around the nipple.The benefits of the TRAM-flap procedure (the acronym stands for transverse rectus abdominus muscle) include gaining a breast that feels and moves naturally and adjusts itself to the body's weight loss or weight gain.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1995
It was April Fools' Day 1992, during a scholarly trip to California, when Walters Art Gallery curator Joaneath Spicer learned her breast cancer had recurred. She hung up the phone in a daze. "I remember going in the bathroon. And it's very satisfying to see that there is no sign -- to see that you are yourself."Over the next month as she prepared for a mastectomy, the promise of breast reconstruction helped Dr. Spicer preserve her belief that life would one day return to normal.Unlike many women facing the same choice, the curator was not deterred by ambivalence about whether breast reconstruction is a matter of sanity or vanity -- a debate that threatens to influence insurance coverage.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
Racking up the miles on her bike has become a not-so-secret addiction for Julie Lanahan, a healthy habit she never imagined she would hunger after. "You sort of crave it," said the breast cancer survivor, who will take part in Sunday's Iron Girl Columbia, an all-women's sprint triathlon that kicks off with a swim in Centennial Lake, followed by a bike ride and run on local roads. Organizers say 1,800 women have signed up and a crowd of 4,000 to 5,000 spectators is expected for the popular event in Ellicott City, which started in 2006 and draws whole families who turn out to cheer on the participants.
FEATURES
By Michael Blowen and Michael Blowen,Boston Globe | March 12, 1995
Remember Priscilla Goodbody?She was the fictional, invisible network censor trotted out every time Johnny Carson wanted to take a jab at the prim and proper Broadcast Standards and Practices office at NBC. She was a humorless schoolmarm type who objected to the word "toilet," demanded that married men and women on TV inhabit separate beds, if not separate rooms, and was constantly on Mr. Carson's case for his legendary double-entendres. She even wanted to censor his devilish smirk.Things change.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | April 20, 1993
A Glen Burnie pharmacy begins offering today a product for mastectomy patients that its manufacturer says is "the wave of the future."The product, the Discrene breast form, attaches directly to the body, making it more lifelike, said Tracy Julius, a sales representative for Coloplast, Inc."You can swim in it and shower in it," she said. "And you can wear regular bras, swimsuits and lingerie."From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. today and tomorrow, Ms. Julius and Michele Owens, a pharmacist and certified fitter at Empire Pharmacy, will hold presentations and answer questions on the product at the pharmacy on Hospital Drive, across from North Arundel Hospital.
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