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Breast Cancer Treatment

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NEWS
May 18, 2013
Oh, no! Here we go again with another "awareness conversation" ("Breast cancer: Angelina Jolie starts the conversation," May 16). After the fortunes raised by Race for the Cure and the other breast cancer groups, must we consider having both our breasts removed? I'm beginning to think being a woman is a life-long death sentence. In "starting the conversation," why didn't Angelina Jolie mention how much her surgery, reconstruction and rehabilitation cost? If an initial exam is $3,000, what is the price of the entire procedure?
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
Michael Bodley and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Marlene MacGregor knew she was going to be a medical guinea pig, but she agreed anyway. Doctors at Medstar Union Memorial Hospital offered the 70-year-old Nottingham resident several options after a biopsy revealed she had Stage 1 breast cancer . After surgery to remove the tumor, she was told traditional radiation therapy - in which a patient goes through weeks of daily radiation treatment - was the tried and true method, with over 30 years...
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HEALTH
Michael Bodley and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Marlene MacGregor knew she was going to be a medical guinea pig, but she agreed anyway. Doctors at Medstar Union Memorial Hospital offered the 70-year-old Nottingham resident several options after a biopsy revealed she had Stage 1 breast cancer . After surgery to remove the tumor, she was told traditional radiation therapy - in which a patient goes through weeks of daily radiation treatment - was the tried and true method, with over 30 years...
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt Cech, For The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
After her first round of breast cancer treatment, Judy Davanzo was troubled by the appearance of her husband. "At the end of it, he just looked beat," says Davanzo, a 47-year-old Timonium mother of two. "That struck me. " Even when she felt well enough that her husband, Drew, could get away to play golf with friends or their family could go on vacation, Davanzo says, her medication would inevitably stop working or she'd take a turn for...
NEWS
By Susan Schoenberger | February 28, 1991
When Kelly Sue Whittington learned yesterday that a judge has required Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland to pay for an expensive breast cancer treatment she underwent last year, she thought of all the other women who might be in her shoes in years to come."
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 9, 2004
A new family of drugs, known as aromatase inhibitors, is more effective at treating breast cancer in older women than the current gold-standard drug, tamoxifen, researchers said yesterday. The drugs also reduced recurrence of the disease and eliminated the most severe side effects associated with breast cancer treatment . A major international study of more than 9,000 women with localized breast cancer showed that one of the drugs, anastrozole, raised disease-free survival by 10 percent, increased the time to recurrence by 20 percent and reduced spread of the cancer to the second breast by 40 percent, compared with tamoxifen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
The iceman cometh — to Power Plant Live on Sunday. That would be Bob Roberts, and what he can do to a 300-pound block of ice is the reason why jaws were made with the ability to drop. With chisels, chain saws and a welcome flair for showmanship, Roberts can turn frozen water into just about any shape imaginable. Sunday, at what is billed as Maryland Winterfest 2011 , he and some fellow ice sculptors will be showing off what they can do all in the name of raising money for breast cancer treatment.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2012
The underlying medical condition that contributed to the death of writer and filmmaker Nora Ephron and is forcing ABC news anchor Robin Roberts to get a bone marrow transplant is a rare and complicated disease that scientists are still trying to figure out. Both women were afflicted with myelodysplastic syndrome, a group of disorders caused when the body produces damaged blood cells. Abnormal cells can eventually outnumber good cells, leaving people with low blood cell counts and needing transfusions and other treatments.
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt Cech, For The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
After her first round of breast cancer treatment, Judy Davanzo was troubled by the appearance of her husband. "At the end of it, he just looked beat," says Davanzo, a 47-year-old Timonium mother of two. "That struck me. " Even when she felt well enough that her husband, Drew, could get away to play golf with friends or their family could go on vacation, Davanzo says, her medication would inevitably stop working or she'd take a turn for...
LIFESTYLE
By Mindy Athas, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2011
Many cancer patients end treatment underweight. Post-treatment breast cancer patients, however, often end up overweight. This can sometimes be attributed to medications such as steroids or chemotherapy. Or the patient is overweight to begin with. Losing this weight is a worthy goal as overweight and obese patients have an increased risk for cancer recurrence, studies say, as well as chronic diseases such as heart disease and diabetes. Find your Body Mass Index, a measure of your weight in kilograms divided by your height in meters squared.
NEWS
May 18, 2013
Oh, no! Here we go again with another "awareness conversation" ("Breast cancer: Angelina Jolie starts the conversation," May 16). After the fortunes raised by Race for the Cure and the other breast cancer groups, must we consider having both our breasts removed? I'm beginning to think being a woman is a life-long death sentence. In "starting the conversation," why didn't Angelina Jolie mention how much her surgery, reconstruction and rehabilitation cost? If an initial exam is $3,000, what is the price of the entire procedure?
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2012
The underlying medical condition that contributed to the death of writer and filmmaker Nora Ephron and is forcing ABC news anchor Robin Roberts to get a bone marrow transplant is a rare and complicated disease that scientists are still trying to figure out. Both women were afflicted with myelodysplastic syndrome, a group of disorders caused when the body produces damaged blood cells. Abnormal cells can eventually outnumber good cells, leaving people with low blood cell counts and needing transfusions and other treatments.
LIFESTYLE
By Mindy Athas, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2011
Many cancer patients end treatment underweight. Post-treatment breast cancer patients, however, often end up overweight. This can sometimes be attributed to medications such as steroids or chemotherapy. Or the patient is overweight to begin with. Losing this weight is a worthy goal as overweight and obese patients have an increased risk for cancer recurrence, studies say, as well as chronic diseases such as heart disease and diabetes. Find your Body Mass Index, a measure of your weight in kilograms divided by your height in meters squared.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
The iceman cometh — to Power Plant Live on Sunday. That would be Bob Roberts, and what he can do to a 300-pound block of ice is the reason why jaws were made with the ability to drop. With chisels, chain saws and a welcome flair for showmanship, Roberts can turn frozen water into just about any shape imaginable. Sunday, at what is billed as Maryland Winterfest 2011 , he and some fellow ice sculptors will be showing off what they can do all in the name of raising money for breast cancer treatment.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2005
Linda Perez said it was a little more than a year ago when her life came to a screeching halt on the cool steel table of a doctor's office at Anne Arundel Medical Center. "The doctor looked and me and told me there was cancer in my breast," said Perez. "A lot of cancer." A nurse, wife and mother of three, Perez said she recalls walking out of the office and sinking into a chair in the hospital lobby. That's when - if only for a moment - a flash of hope came to her. "This woman just walked up to me and put her hand on my shoulder," said Perez, 44. "She looked at me and said, `You are exactly where I was one year ago.' " The woman, Denise O'Neill - also a mother of three - had recently undergone radiation and surgery for the breast cancer she was diagnosed with in April 2003.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2004
A new genetic test accurately predicts which women will have a greater chance of breast cancer recurrence, according to studies that hold out hope of increasing survival rates among high-risk patients while helping others avoid agonizing chemotherapy. "The results are quite striking," said one of the researchers, JoAnne Zujewski, director of breast cancer therapeutics in the Clinical Investigations Branch of the National Cancer Institute. The technique was the subject of three new studies, which were released yesterday and Thursday at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | February 22, 2000
BOSTON -- This time, the insurance company is right. This time, the folks whose minds are often clouded by dollars are making sense. And this time, the old familiar scenario -- a patient fighting for payment of life-saving therapy against uncaring insurance company -- is temporarily turned on its head. The Aetna insurance company has announced that it will no longer pay breast cancer patients for bone marrow transplants unless the patients are part of a federally funded experiment. Two weeks after the discovery that a South African researcher phonied up research showing that transplants were more effective than the standard treatment, Aetna stopped funding the therapy that has sent 30,000 women into a roller coaster ride of risk and hope, for very little benefit.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2004
A new genetic test accurately predicts which women will have a greater chance of breast cancer recurrence, according to studies that hold out hope of increasing survival rates among high-risk patients while helping others avoid agonizing chemotherapy. "The results are quite striking," said one of the researchers, JoAnne Zujewski, director of breast cancer therapeutics in the Clinical Investigations Branch of the National Cancer Institute. The technique was the subject of three new studies, which were released yesterday and Thursday at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 9, 2004
A new family of drugs, known as aromatase inhibitors, is more effective at treating breast cancer in older women than the current gold-standard drug, tamoxifen, researchers said yesterday. The drugs also reduced recurrence of the disease and eliminated the most severe side effects associated with breast cancer treatment . A major international study of more than 9,000 women with localized breast cancer showed that one of the drugs, anastrozole, raised disease-free survival by 10 percent, increased the time to recurrence by 20 percent and reduced spread of the cancer to the second breast by 40 percent, compared with tamoxifen.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | February 22, 2000
BOSTON -- This time, the insurance company is right. This time, the folks whose minds are often clouded by dollars are making sense. And this time, the old familiar scenario -- a patient fighting for payment of life-saving therapy against uncaring insurance company -- is temporarily turned on its head. The Aetna insurance company has announced that it will no longer pay breast cancer patients for bone marrow transplants unless the patients are part of a federally funded experiment. Two weeks after the discovery that a South African researcher phonied up research showing that transplants were more effective than the standard treatment, Aetna stopped funding the therapy that has sent 30,000 women into a roller coaster ride of risk and hope, for very little benefit.
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