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LIFESTYLE
Susan Reimer | October 13, 2011
It can be one of the nasty surprises for breast cancer patients. After the lump, the biopsy, the surgery, the radiation and the chemo, the wig and the mastectomy bathing suit — as if these things were not enough — suddenly one arm, or both, swells monstrously, painfully. It is lymphedema. And nobody warned you about it. "I never expected it. I never even heard of it," said Tia Neale, a breast cancer patient who lives in Owings Mills. She is resting on an examining table at Mercy Medical Center's Weinberg Center while therapist Maureen McBeth gently massages her chest, stomach, arm and hand, doing manually what Neale's lymphatic system isn't doing on its own anymore — urging the fluid the body makes ceaselessly into the circulatory system and out of the body.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Danae King and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Eight years ago, Dian Corneliussen-James had surgeons cut out half of her right lung, a risky procedure she believes saved her life. Though she thinks the surgery saved her from death from metastatic breast cancer , which had spread to her lung, she said she is "terrified to go off" the drug, Faslodex, that doctors say could be keeping her alive. Her survival has prompted doctors and others to call her and patients with metastatic breast cancer like her "outliers" because they don't know why some patients with the incurable disease live a long time.
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NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2008
Sandra Woodring has a soft spot for people with cancer. For a living, she works as an oncology registered nurse, and when she's off the clock, she supports breast cancer patients. "I just feel like I have to do something for women who have breast cancer," said Woodring, 40, of Street. "I wake up with an outlook on life on what a gift it is that I don't have cancer. Support for these women is something that's missing, and you can't put a job title on it." Woodring, who works at Bel Air Oncology, offers support through a program she helped start about six years ago called BCAUSE, Breast Cancer and U Support and Encouragement.
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt Cech, For The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
After her first round of breast cancer treatment, Judy Davanzo was troubled by the appearance of her husband. "At the end of it, he just looked beat," says Davanzo, a 47-year-old Timonium mother of two. "That struck me. " Even when she felt well enough that her husband, Drew, could get away to play golf with friends or their family could go on vacation, Davanzo says, her medication would inevitably stop working or she'd take a turn for...
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2001
Annette Grainger Drummond, a tireless advocate for breast cancer patients and a longtime science teacher in Baltimore city and county, died Monday of breast cancer at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. She was 74. Mrs. Drummond, a resident of Timonium, taught middle school science -- primarily to seventh-graders -- at Woodbourne Junior High School in Baltimore from 1957 to 1968 and in the county at Cockeysville Junior High School and Ridgeley Middle School from 1970 to 1981.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith | October 20, 1992
For the first time, major health organizations have agreed upon standards clarifying which breast cancer patients should be offered the option of lumpectomy and radiation therapy as an alternative to removal of the breast, the American College of Radiology announced today.At least one-third of all breast cancer patients could be eligible for a lumpectomy -- removal of the primary breast tumor and adjacent breast tissue -- followed by about six weeks of radiation therapy instead of mastectomy, under the new guidelines.
NEWS
June 8, 2009
* The Red Devils, a nonprofit group that funds improved quality of life for Maryland breast cancer patients and their families, will hold its annual Heart and Sole Stroll beginning at 10 a.m. Sunday at Centennial Park in Columbia. Individual registration is $35; family registration is $70. Organizers are hoping to raise $130,000. More information is available at heartandsolestroll.org or 410-323-0135. * St. Agnes Hospital will host a free blood pressure screening from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 17 at Security Square Mall in Baltimore.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 14, 2005
Black women with breast cancer don't live as long as white women, but their deaths are more often caused by other health problems, such as diabetes and high blood pressure, according to a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The findings underscore new thinking that patients and their doctors need to pay more attention to eating better, managing salt intake and exercising regularly. "Everyone worries about cancer staring them in the face, but the reality is, most breast cancer patients die of something else," said Diana Dyer, a registered dietitian from Ann Arbor, Mich.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 5, 1998
CHRISTOPHER Rutland, a Severna Park Middle School pupil, has won a full-tuition academic scholarship to Archbishop Spalding High School.The scholarships are even more highly sought after than admission to the school. More than 400 eighth-graders are vying for the fewer than 250 slots that will be available to the Class of 2002.B&A Trail walk plannedPark Ranger David DeVault has scheduled a search-for-spring hike along the B&A Trail at 10 a.m. March 14.If the previous weather is any indication, this hike, which begins at the Jones Station Road/B&A Trail intersection in Severna Park, should be a great success.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1996
Osiris Therapeutics, a Baltimore biotechnology company, said yesterday that it will provide grants to the Ireland Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland to help pay for a clinical trial of a blood-boosting cell therapy the company has developed.Osiris' grants will pay for use of the therapy in breast cancer patients whose insurance does not cover such infusions.The clinical trial, which could involve up to 30 patients, began last month. It involves studying the safety of the Osiris therapy, which is designed to boost breast cancer patients' blood cell counts, said James Burns, Osiris' president.
HEALTH
October 30, 2013
A selection of resources for breast cancer patients and families: Nonprofits, charities and support groups Active Survivors Network Helps people affected by illness, disease and accidents to maintain an active lifestyle. activesurvivor.org or 410-823-0562 American Breast Cancer Foundation Towson-based, national, 501(c)3 non-profit organization whose goal is to reduce the financial barriers to early detection screenings and diagnostic tests for the uninsured and underserved, regardless of age or gender.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Clare Fischer, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
After undergoing treatment for breast cancer , Lillie Shockney, the administrative director of the Johns Hopkins Breast Center, had nipple reconstruction - twice. Despite the many shades of patients' skin tone, "The color choices for doing it in the hospital setting were beige, dark brown and the most common color, called 'salmon,' " Shockney said. She chose salmon and the result, she said, "looked like two pancakes. " Then she saw the work of Vinnie Myers on one of her own patients and went to him. When the procedure was finished, she looked in the mirror and burst into tears.
HEALTH
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2012
A stranger approached a cluster of women laughing and chatting at an Annapolis coffee shop and politely inquired what type of group was having so much fun. "One that you don't want to join," answered 55-year-old Sally Ring, setting off another wave of giggles. Moments earlier, Ring had told the group her cancer had spread to her bones and she'd had another stint on a ventilator. Her colorful storytelling had the women doubled over. "My motto for through this whole thing is that somebody has it much worse," Ring said.
LIFESTYLE
Susan Reimer | October 13, 2011
It can be one of the nasty surprises for breast cancer patients. After the lump, the biopsy, the surgery, the radiation and the chemo, the wig and the mastectomy bathing suit — as if these things were not enough — suddenly one arm, or both, swells monstrously, painfully. It is lymphedema. And nobody warned you about it. "I never expected it. I never even heard of it," said Tia Neale, a breast cancer patient who lives in Owings Mills. She is resting on an examining table at Mercy Medical Center's Weinberg Center while therapist Maureen McBeth gently massages her chest, stomach, arm and hand, doing manually what Neale's lymphatic system isn't doing on its own anymore — urging the fluid the body makes ceaselessly into the circulatory system and out of the body.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2011
Paula Jagemann had thought of herself as a retired entrepreneur. Then an idea for a startup grabbed her and wouldn't let go. While on the board of Frederick Memorial Hospital, she learned that breast cancer patients have a hard time tracking down all the specialized home-health items they need. Jagemann, an e-commerce veteran, thought it was a problem crying out for an online business solution. This month, the Frederick woman launched Someone With, which aims to collect and sell the best products for patients — from deodorant that won't interfere with chemotherapy to moisture-wicking bedsheets for the hot flashes that come with treatment.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2010
After feeling a mass deep inside the tissue of her left breast, Sandra Gray faced a series of uphill battles that seemed unusually daunting. First, the longtime Columbia activist and wife of former County Councilman Vernon Gray had to convince doctors last August that the breast cancer was actually there because they couldn't detect it, she said. Then, she had to drum up physicians' support for a modified radical mastectomy, because surgeons balked at removing the breast when cancer still hadn't been found on a mammogram.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1996
Driven by insurance rules and new attitudes toward recovery, Maryland hospitals are limiting most mastectomy patients to an overnight stay or an outpatient routine that has women going home hours after surgery.A decade ago, women were hospitalized for up to a week after having a cancerous breast removed. It was a time for nurses to check drains and dressings, and for patients to begin recovering from an operation that can be painful and disfiguring.But in an era when hospitals do outpatient hernia repairs and discharge patients a day after gallbladder operations, they are preparing breast cancer patients to recover at home.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN REPORTER | May 16, 2008
In a stark reversal of a long-term trend, more early-stage breast cancer patients are choosing mastectomy, despite evidence that the aggressive, disfiguring surgery has the same survival rate as removing the malignant lump, new research shows. The study by doctors at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., suggests that a more detailed screening technique may have led additional women to have their breasts removed. But researchers also found a rise in mastectomies among women who weren't examined with the new magnetic resonance imaging technology.
HEALTH
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2010
As she organizes her second annual run to raise funds for breast cancer research, Darby Steadman is facing what she calls a delightful dilemma. She has no shortage of runners. The event in a Millersville park next Saturday is maxed out at about 250 registered participants and dozens of volunteers. The Driving Miss Darby Foundation, a nonprofit organization founded by Steadman and friends, may have to close registrations. "Isn't that a nice problem to have?" said the 40-year-old mother of two, who is battling breast cancer . Undeterred by the possibility of too many participants, she has expanded the event to "dozers.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 2, 2010
Susan Mae Marangi, who waged a nearly three-decade battle against breast cancer with a combination of courage, hope and humor, succumbed to the disease Thursday at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Parkville resident was 62. The daughter of a career Marine Corps officer and a homemaker, Ms. Marangi was born in Seattle and raised in Bremerton, Wash. After graduating from West High School in Bremerton, she enlisted in the Air Force and served in intelligence until being discharged in 1969.
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