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By Medical Tribune News Service | June 24, 1994
Women under age 30 who are diagnosed with breast cancer during pregnancy are more than three times as likely to die from the disease as breast-cancer patients who have never been pregnant, Texas researchers report.The study of 407 women ages 20 to 29 also showed an adverse effect of recent pregnancy on breast-cancer survival.The shorter the time between a pregnancy and a cancer diagnosis, the greater the risk of dying from the disease, researchers from the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Can cer Center in Houston reported in this week's issue of the medical jour nal Lancet.
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HEALTH
Michael Bodley and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Marlene MacGregor knew she was going to be a medical guinea pig, but she agreed anyway. Doctors at Medstar Union Memorial Hospital offered the 70-year-old Nottingham resident several options after a biopsy revealed she had Stage 1 breast cancer . After surgery to remove the tumor, she was told traditional radiation therapy - in which a patient goes through weeks of daily radiation treatment - was the tried and true method, with over 30 years...
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NEWS
By Mary Knudson | September 19, 1991
Some Maryland hospitals have shied away from a state program to make low-cost breast-cancer screening widely available, apparently fearing they could not afford to continue it when the program is over.The newly formed Governor's Cancer Control Council yesterday discussed ways of improving the participation in a state that leads the country in cancer death rates.The council has set a premium on extending the availability of mammography to more Maryland women, because the technique will detect many breast cancers at an early stage when they are more curable than after the cancer has spread.
FEATURES
By Lisa Driscoll and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
After 13 years of experience in Maryland real estate, David Orso decided to use his skills to better equip those entering the housing market by writing a book. That this effort would also become a way to pay tribute to his wife was a heartbreaking coincidence. The book, "Step Inside: The Unfiltered Truth About Listing and Selling Your Home," reveals insider advice on finding the best agent, listing and pricing a home, roles of listing agents, and how to go from listed to sold smoothly.
FEATURES
By Barbara Lewis and Barbara Lewis,Medical Tribune News Service | July 25, 1995
Women who gain weight in adulthood -- particularly when they LTC are in their 30s -- face an increased risk of breast cancer, Florida researchers have found.Their study of 218 newly diagnosed breast-cancer patients found that more than 63 percent of the women had gained at least 15 pounds since they turned 30, compared to 50 percent of those in a control group of healthy women.More than 48 percent of the breast-cancer patients had gained 15 pounds or more since age 16, compared to 37 percent of the control group, according to the study, published in the current issue of the journal Cancer.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Medical Tribune News Service | April 25, 1995
Late last year, an international team of researchers forged a breakthrough in the fight against breast cancer, with its discovery of two genes -- BRCA1 and BRCA2 -- that are linked to an inherited form of breast and ovarian cancer.Although for most cancer patients the news will have little direct significance, it is hoped that the discovery of the aberrant genes TC will lead scientists to genes that play a critical role in causing more common forms of the disease. Breast cancer kills 46,000 women each year in the United States alone.
NEWS
By Newsday | October 7, 1993
Decades of government research on breast cancer have done nothing to improve women's odds of surviving or avoiding the disease.Although hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent on research since the National Cancer Act declared war against malignancies in 1971, the breast-cancer death rate has increased slightly and prevalence has steadily climbed.A Newsday examination of federal research spending shows a number of factors converged to stymie progress against the disease. Women's health research was a low priority and women were routinely excluded from general health studies.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 25, 1998
SEATTLE -- Women who don't have a strong family history of breast cancer should not worry about being tested for one of the major breast-cancer genes, University of Washington researchers reported yesterday.In the study, only 2.6 percent of women who already had the disease were found to have a defective BRCA1 gene, linked to breast and ovarian cancer.Statistically, one in eight women in the United States develops breast cancer; experts estimate the disease will kill more than 43,500 this year.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Medical Tribune News Service | March 21, 1995
By now, most women are familiar with the benefits of regular exercise in preventing heart disease, strengthening bones, lessening back pain and warding off other chronic diseases. What isn't well-known is something researchers have suspected for years: that exercise plays a strong role in preventing certain types of cancer, including breast cancer.Recent research from the University of Southern California School of Medicine indicates that women who exercise regularly during childbearing years can significantly reduce their risk of developing malignant breast tumors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | November 7, 1999
The Ward Center at St. Paul's School was in the pink for the American Cancer Society's "With One Voice" celebration to fight breast cancer. There were bunches of pink balloons, pink tablecloths, pink centerpieces and pink roses on the lapels of breast-cancer survivors.Some 125 people gathered for a buffet dinner, including Barbara Little and Jeanne Tsakalos, event committee members; Sam Miller, ACS Mid-Atlantic board president; Dr. Mark J. Brenner and Jacqueline Chambers, board members; Harriet Legum, 1998 One Voice honoree; Charlie Leiss, chief operating officer of ACS Mid-Atlantic division; Dr. William Dooley, director of the Johns Hopkins Breast Center; Ellen McCallum, breast-cancer survivor; and A. Michael Jackson, partner in Greenspring Ventures.
HEALTH
By Danae King and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Eight years ago, Dian Corneliussen-James had surgeons cut out half of her right lung, a risky procedure she believes saved her life. Though she thinks the surgery saved her from death from metastatic breast cancer , which had spread to her lung, she said she is "terrified to go off" the drug, Faslodex, that doctors say could be keeping her alive. Her survival has prompted doctors and others to call her and patients with metastatic breast cancer like her "outliers" because they don't know why some patients with the incurable disease live a long time.
HEALTH
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
When Mary Casterline was diagnosed with invasive carcinoma of the breast in mid-April, she knew she was fortunate. Her cancer was very treatable and she had a lot of options for both treatment and beyond. Casterline's doctors explained that she had the choice between radiation and lumpectomy (removing just the tumor but preserving the breast) or a mastectomy (complete removal of the breast). If she opted for mastectomy, she could choose to reconstruct the breast, either with an implant or via free tissue transfer (also known as "tissue flap" or "trans flap")
HEALTH
By Karen Nitkin and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
The double mastectomy took her breasts and the cancer they contained. Elissa Bantug was just 25. She was used to a satisfying, uncomplicated sex life with her live-in boyfriend, and she craved that intimacy as she looked ahead to her post-cancer life. Three days after the surgery, "grabbing at straws and wanting to feel normal," she gave her boyfriend, AJ, the come-hither look that had always worked in the past. This time, however, he balked, afraid of hurting her.  "We had a huge fight," recalled Bantug, now 33. Though she is now married to AJ and living in Columbia with their children, finding their way back to intimacy was a struggle.
HEALTH
October 1, 2014
Think Pink Zumba Charity Event Zumba party to raise funds for two charities in Maryland assisting women battling with breast cancer : the Red Devils and Sisters Network Inc. Noon-2 p.m. Saturday at Downtown Cultural Arts Center, 401 N. Howard St., Baltimore. $10. the-red-devils.org Sweating for the Sisters Bokwa workout benefits the Tyanna Foundation. 9:30 am. Saturdays in October at Hard Rock Cafe Baltimore outdoor pier, 601 E. Pratt St. $10. tyanna.org/baltimore/events Equine Wine Festival Wine tasting and purchase, music, a food court, an outdoor horse arena with demonstrations, pony rides, horse-drawn wagon rides, artisans and more.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Some women at high risk for breast cancer because of an inherited gene mutation, including actress Angelina Jolie, are choosing to have preventive double mastectomies. Other women who have cancer in one breast are asking their doctors to remove the other breast removed out of caution. Whatever the reason, more women are having both breasts removed in response to cancer or a cancer threat. Dr. David Euhus, chief of breast surgery in the division of surgical oncology at Johns Hopkins Hospital, explains the trend and what happens after.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske and For The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Breast cancer gets a lot of attention - and not just during October, which is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. There's a good reason for that, as any of the quarter-million American women diagnosed with breast cancer each year will tell you. But breast cancer isn't the only serious health risk women should be aware of, according to county health professionals. Some are fatal; others are not. Some are well-known, others obscure. All affect the person's quality of life, and all affect more women than men. We talked with some Howard County doctors in the know to find out what to look out for and where to learn more locally.
NEWS
By [LIZ ATWOOD] | October 14, 2007
October is Breast Cancer Awareness month -- a time when many companies paint their products pink and donate a portion of sales to breast-cancer causes. Every year, it seems the list of pink products grows. This year there are pink Hershey's Kisses and pink Tic-Tacs. Red Envelope has pink wine openers and pink purses. Cross has pink pens, and equestrians can find pink cowboy hats and riding gloves. Here are some other pink products to help a worthy cause: 1. Dyson DC07 Vacuum Price: $399 Where to get it: Target Why we like it: The vacuum comes with a lifetime Hepa filter and a quick-empty system that means you don't have to touch the dust.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | September 20, 1994
Boston.--So this is what we have been waiting for.When the first ''disease genes'' were identified and a few people had to decide if they wanted to know whether they were doomed by their DNA, ethicists would shake their heads and say, ''If you think these are tough issues, just wait till they find the breast-cancer gene.''When it was first clear that genetic tests could enable employers and insurers to screen for inherited, truly pre-existing, conditions, someone would say, ''Just wait till they find the breast-cancer gene.
NEWS
By Kym Byrnes and For The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
A sea of blue - the color designated to promote prostate cancer awareness - bobbed up and down around the Towson University campus Sunday morning as more than 2,000 people participated in the eighth-annual ZERO Prostate Cancer Run/Walk. One in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and more than 33,000 men will die this year of the disease, according to Patricia Schnably, event organizer and vice president of marketing and communications at Chesapeake Urology. "Like a lot of cancers, if you don't catch it early, it spreads through the body and eventually will kill you," Schnably said.
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