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Breast Augmentation

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NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2004
To Dr. Sheri Slezak, the Food and Drug Administration's 1992 hearings on silicone-gel breast implants seemed more like a political convention than a gathering of scientific minds. Attendees donned buttons and waved signs, like party faithful pushing candidates. "People emotionally and fervently believe in whatever side they are on," said Slezak, an associate professor of plastic surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. More than 11 years after the FDA banned the sale of the implants for general use, that remains as true as ever.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2011
Some women who want rounder, fuller buttocks are turning to a dangerous cosmetic procedure: illegal injections of silicone offered by people who lack medical training and may buy their supplies in home improvement stores. The trend — which has already sent one exotic dancer from Baltimore's Block to the hospital with silicone in her lungs — has alarmed public health officials and plastic surgeons, who say the injections can maim or kill recipients. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and other agencies have been investigating the incident in Baltimore and others across the country.
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FEATURES
June 19, 2008
Though water has always been a hazard to be wary of, the idea that someone could drown hours after visiting a swimming pool may seem new to many. On June 1, 10-year-old Johnny Jackson of Charleston, S.C., died while napping more than an hour after returning home from the pool with his mother. The incident has drawn new attention to the phenomenon of dry drowning, a danger long recognized by other names by emergency department physicians. Medical examiners have found that as many as 15 percent of drowning fatalities are dry drowning victims - those whose respiratory distress comes after an incident in the water.
FEATURES
June 19, 2008
Though water has always been a hazard to be wary of, the idea that someone could drown hours after visiting a swimming pool may seem new to many. On June 1, 10-year-old Johnny Jackson of Charleston, S.C., died while napping more than an hour after returning home from the pool with his mother. The incident has drawn new attention to the phenomenon of dry drowning, a danger long recognized by other names by emergency department physicians. Medical examiners have found that as many as 15 percent of drowning fatalities are dry drowning victims - those whose respiratory distress comes after an incident in the water.
FEATURES
By Elise T. Chisolm | March 31, 1992
I am mad. And I'm not sure to whom I should direct my wrath:Toward all the women who want breast augmentation -- more than 2 million since the implants have been on the market;Toward the men who admire the recipients of such cosmetic surgery;Toward Dow Corning, the company that made the silicone-gel implants for three decades;Toward the Food And Drug Administration, which failed to say ''no'' sooner and did not adequately warn women of the risks;Or to...
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | March 31, 1993
If you're 100 percent satisfied with the face and body God gave you, turn the page.But if you're like the other 99.9 percent of the population, keep reading. There are more procedures and surgeries now available to improve your looks than you would have ever dreamed possible.On Monday, about 100 estheticians from Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, New York and beyond gathered in Annapolis to learn more about advances in cosmetic surgery, as well as new skin-care products aimed at making people look, well, younger and more beautiful.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 13, 1997
The problem with HBO's "Breast Men" is too many breasts on the screen and too many men behind the camera.The result is a film totally lacking in humanity that leers at flesh when it should be looking hard at how our culture defines femininity and warps some women's lives.HBO calls "Breast Men" a "satiric historical dramatization" of silicone breast implants, comparing it to the acclaimed "Barbarians at the Gate." But, in fact, the film is closer in tone to the adolescent giddiness of a boys' school locker room on Friday night than it is social satire.
FEATURES
By Julia Furlong | December 1, 2003
Remember when grandpa used to grumble about how a chocolate bar only cost him a few pennies in the good ol' days? Well, hide the latest Godiva Chocolatier catalog, because the poor old guy just might keel over. Chocolate has reached a new extreme of decadence, as illustrated by the 24-Karat Tower with Signature Ribbon, a 7-pound, 4.95-ounce mountain of truffles, chocolates and other confections, priced at an anything-but-modest $250. Have a taste for a richer flavor? How about the new 12-Month Godiva Gift Ensemble, for $350?
NEWS
By Judy Peres and Judy Peres,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 22, 2007
Cosmetic surgery might look easy and danger-free on television programs. It might be readily available through the nearest doctor's office. But it is still surgery, and surgery carries risk. "On television, people are always having extreme makeovers," said Dr. David Song, chief of plastic surgery at University of Chicago Hospitals. "People don't understand it's real surgery with real risks." On top of that, cosmetic procedures are a lucrative fee-for-service business. Insurance typically does not cover them, except for reconstructive surgery, so people pay cash if they want their face lifted or tummy tucked.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2011
Some women who want rounder, fuller buttocks are turning to a dangerous cosmetic procedure: illegal injections of silicone offered by people who lack medical training and may buy their supplies in home improvement stores. The trend — which has already sent one exotic dancer from Baltimore's Block to the hospital with silicone in her lungs — has alarmed public health officials and plastic surgeons, who say the injections can maim or kill recipients. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and other agencies have been investigating the incident in Baltimore and others across the country.
NEWS
By Judy Peres and Judy Peres,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 22, 2007
Cosmetic surgery might look easy and danger-free on television programs. It might be readily available through the nearest doctor's office. But it is still surgery, and surgery carries risk. "On television, people are always having extreme makeovers," said Dr. David Song, chief of plastic surgery at University of Chicago Hospitals. "People don't understand it's real surgery with real risks." On top of that, cosmetic procedures are a lucrative fee-for-service business. Insurance typically does not cover them, except for reconstructive surgery, so people pay cash if they want their face lifted or tummy tucked.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | October 17, 2004
ABINGDON -- Kelly Alemi is a very pretty woman.aiiiiidudu She should be. Fox TV's hit make-over series, The Swan, spent an estimated $250,000 turning Maryland's ugly duckling into a possible winner of the season-ending beauty pageant. (She was among the final six contestants.) But the surprise is that she looks better now than when she saw herself in a mirror for the first time in three months with a new face and figure, white-blond hair extensions and bright red lipstick. The result was a cross between Pamela Anderson and Barbie, only a little heavier, wedged into a black Tadashi gown.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2004
To Dr. Sheri Slezak, the Food and Drug Administration's 1992 hearings on silicone-gel breast implants seemed more like a political convention than a gathering of scientific minds. Attendees donned buttons and waved signs, like party faithful pushing candidates. "People emotionally and fervently believe in whatever side they are on," said Slezak, an associate professor of plastic surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. More than 11 years after the FDA banned the sale of the implants for general use, that remains as true as ever.
FEATURES
By Julia Furlong | December 1, 2003
Remember when grandpa used to grumble about how a chocolate bar only cost him a few pennies in the good ol' days? Well, hide the latest Godiva Chocolatier catalog, because the poor old guy just might keel over. Chocolate has reached a new extreme of decadence, as illustrated by the 24-Karat Tower with Signature Ribbon, a 7-pound, 4.95-ounce mountain of truffles, chocolates and other confections, priced at an anything-but-modest $250. Have a taste for a richer flavor? How about the new 12-Month Godiva Gift Ensemble, for $350?
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 13, 1997
The problem with HBO's "Breast Men" is too many breasts on the screen and too many men behind the camera.The result is a film totally lacking in humanity that leers at flesh when it should be looking hard at how our culture defines femininity and warps some women's lives.HBO calls "Breast Men" a "satiric historical dramatization" of silicone breast implants, comparing it to the acclaimed "Barbarians at the Gate." But, in fact, the film is closer in tone to the adolescent giddiness of a boys' school locker room on Friday night than it is social satire.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | March 31, 1993
If you're 100 percent satisfied with the face and body God gave you, turn the page.But if you're like the other 99.9 percent of the population, keep reading. There are more procedures and surgeries now available to improve your looks than you would have ever dreamed possible.On Monday, about 100 estheticians from Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, New York and beyond gathered in Annapolis to learn more about advances in cosmetic surgery, as well as new skin-care products aimed at making people look, well, younger and more beautiful.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | October 17, 2004
ABINGDON -- Kelly Alemi is a very pretty woman.aiiiiidudu She should be. Fox TV's hit make-over series, The Swan, spent an estimated $250,000 turning Maryland's ugly duckling into a possible winner of the season-ending beauty pageant. (She was among the final six contestants.) But the surprise is that she looks better now than when she saw herself in a mirror for the first time in three months with a new face and figure, white-blond hair extensions and bright red lipstick. The result was a cross between Pamela Anderson and Barbie, only a little heavier, wedged into a black Tadashi gown.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | April 20, 2012
Apparently Americans aren't happy with their chins. Chinplants are the fastest growing plastic surgery, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. And both men and women are getting the procedure. The chin and jawline are among the first parts of the face to show signs of aging and chin implants can make people look more youthful, the group said. The procedure saw a 71 percent increase from 2010 to 2011, when 20,680 people got chin augmentation. Women had led the trend with 10,087 of the surgeries, but men weren't far behind with 10,593 procedures.
FEATURES
By Elise T. Chisolm | March 31, 1992
I am mad. And I'm not sure to whom I should direct my wrath:Toward all the women who want breast augmentation -- more than 2 million since the implants have been on the market;Toward the men who admire the recipients of such cosmetic surgery;Toward Dow Corning, the company that made the silicone-gel implants for three decades;Toward the Food And Drug Administration, which failed to say ''no'' sooner and did not adequately warn women of the risks;Or to...
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