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NEWS
November 15, 2012
When did breast-feeding become everyone's business ("Maryland urges hospitals to encourage early breast-feeding," Nov. 14)? I am shocked at how many complete strangers ask new mothers if they are breast-feeding. Now the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene is encouraging hospitals not to give pacifiers or formula to new mothers. Yes, studies have shown that "breast is best. " Yes, it is a powerful bonding experience between a mother and child. But if a new mom medically can't nurse her newborn, she is left feeling like a failure.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
Michael Bodley and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Marlene MacGregor knew she was going to be a medical guinea pig, but she agreed anyway. Doctors at Medstar Union Memorial Hospital offered the 70-year-old Nottingham resident several options after a biopsy revealed she had Stage 1 breast cancer . After surgery to remove the tumor, she was told traditional radiation therapy - in which a patient goes through weeks of daily radiation treatment - was the tried and true method, with over 30 years...
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | November 19, 2012
Update: The American Chemistry Council disputes the study. Here is a statement: “It is concerning that the authors could be over-interpreting their results and unnecessarily alarm workers. This study included no data showing if there was actual chemical exposure, from what chemicals, at what levels, and over what period of time in any particular workplace. Although this is an important area of research, these findings are inconsistent with other research. This study should not be used to draw any conclusions about the cause of cancer patterns in workers.”  The original blog post is below: Women who worked ten years or more in jobs that exosed them to cancer-causing substances and endocrine chemicals increased their odds of getting breast cancer, a new study has found.
FEATURES
By Lisa Driscoll and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
After 13 years of experience in Maryland real estate, David Orso decided to use his skills to better equip those entering the housing market by writing a book. That this effort would also become a way to pay tribute to his wife was a heartbreaking coincidence. The book, "Step Inside: The Unfiltered Truth About Listing and Selling Your Home," reveals insider advice on finding the best agent, listing and pricing a home, roles of listing agents, and how to go from listed to sold smoothly.
NEWS
November 17, 2012
In addition to Maryland hospitals encouraging new mothers to breast feed by describing the many benefits to the infants, the mothers themselves and the mother child bond ("Maryland releases breast-feeding recommendations for hospitals," Nov. 14), hospitals need to encourage the moms to eat healthy diets and reduce stress, the way they were encouraged to have healthy lifestyles while pregnant. Mindie Flamholz
SPORTS
By Arda Ocal | October 30, 2012
It all started at Night of Champions, when John Cena traded in his green attire for pink, signaling the beginning of an official partnership between WWE and Susan G. Komen for the Cure. Until Raw on Monday, pink ribbons were worn by Supersatars, Divas, broadcasters and referees. The entrance ramp, announce table and ring skirts were co-branded. The middle rope was pink. PSAs ran frequently during WWE programming. WWE dove head first into this breast cancer initiative, headlined by all proceeds of John Cena's “Rise Above Cancer” apparel going to fight the cause.
HEALTH
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2010
Growing up in Ohio, Cynthia Zahnow wanted to be a marine biologist and "swim with the dolphins. " But while pursuing her graduate degrees, she became intrigued by the normal physiological and hormonal processes that go wrong when cancer strikes. And when she discovered benign lumps in her breasts as a young woman, she shifted her research focus to breast cancer biology. "I wanted to make an impact, and I wanted to help women," she said. She's 49 now, and for 10 years has worked in the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center in Baltimore, seeking and testing new therapies, and searching for the genetic and molecular clues that can link individual patients to the treatments most likely to help them.
FEATURES
April 2, 1991
Controversy arose last week after a photograph of Deborah Norville breast feeding her infant son appeared on the pages of People magazine.Norville's peers in the electronic news biz disparaged the decision to breast feed in public. "A serious newswoman does not do this," one snipped.The Norville swirl does raise a point, though: Should women routinely breast feed in public? And, further, are you uncomfortable when they do?To register your opinion, call SUNDIAL, the Baltimore Sun's directory of telephone information services at 783-1800 (or 268-7736 in Anne Arundel County)
FEATURES
April 3, 1991
When a photograph of Deborah Norville breast feeding her infant son appeared last week in People magazine, a minor controversy arose. However, a clear majority of callers to SUNDIAL feel that it's okay for a woman to breast feed her child in public.Of the 735 Evening Sun readers and other callers yesterday, 444, or 60 percent, said they thought it was okay for a woman to breast feed in public. Of that total, 361 were male callers, and 236, or 65 percent, approved. Of the 374 female callers, 208, or 55 percent, gave their approval.
NEWS
By EDITORIAL | November 26, 2006
If there is one area of human behavior into which legislatures should not have to intrude, it would surely be breast feeding. Nature's brilliant plan for nourishing infants that also helps support tiny immune systems is regarded by medical experts as superior to any substitute method and thus widely encouraged. Yet more than 40 states, including Maryland, have enacted statutes to affirmatively assert a mother's right to nurse her child in public or at least to exempt her from criminal prosecution under indecency laws.
HEALTH
By Danae King and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Eight years ago, Dian Corneliussen-James had surgeons cut out half of her right lung, a risky procedure she believes saved her life. Though she thinks the surgery saved her from death from metastatic breast cancer , which had spread to her lung, she said she is "terrified to go off" the drug, Faslodex, that doctors say could be keeping her alive. Her survival has prompted doctors and others to call her and patients with metastatic breast cancer like her "outliers" because they don't know why some patients with the incurable disease live a long time.
HEALTH
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
When Mary Casterline was diagnosed with invasive carcinoma of the breast in mid-April, she knew she was fortunate. Her cancer was very treatable and she had a lot of options for both treatment and beyond. Casterline's doctors explained that she had the choice between radiation and lumpectomy (removing just the tumor but preserving the breast) or a mastectomy (complete removal of the breast). If she opted for mastectomy, she could choose to reconstruct the breast, either with an implant or via free tissue transfer (also known as "tissue flap" or "trans flap")
HEALTH
By Karen Nitkin and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
The double mastectomy took her breasts and the cancer they contained. Elissa Bantug was just 25. She was used to a satisfying, uncomplicated sex life with her live-in boyfriend, and she craved that intimacy as she looked ahead to her post-cancer life. Three days after the surgery, "grabbing at straws and wanting to feel normal," she gave her boyfriend, AJ, the come-hither look that had always worked in the past. This time, however, he balked, afraid of hurting her.  "We had a huge fight," recalled Bantug, now 33. Though she is now married to AJ and living in Columbia with their children, finding their way back to intimacy was a struggle.
HEALTH
October 1, 2014
Think Pink Zumba Charity Event Zumba party to raise funds for two charities in Maryland assisting women battling with breast cancer : the Red Devils and Sisters Network Inc. Noon-2 p.m. Saturday at Downtown Cultural Arts Center, 401 N. Howard St., Baltimore. $10. the-red-devils.org Sweating for the Sisters Bokwa workout benefits the Tyanna Foundation. 9:30 am. Saturdays in October at Hard Rock Cafe Baltimore outdoor pier, 601 E. Pratt St. $10. tyanna.org/baltimore/events Equine Wine Festival Wine tasting and purchase, music, a food court, an outdoor horse arena with demonstrations, pony rides, horse-drawn wagon rides, artisans and more.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske and For The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Breast cancer gets a lot of attention - and not just during October, which is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. There's a good reason for that, as any of the quarter-million American women diagnosed with breast cancer each year will tell you. But breast cancer isn't the only serious health risk women should be aware of, according to county health professionals. Some are fatal; others are not. Some are well-known, others obscure. All affect the person's quality of life, and all affect more women than men. We talked with some Howard County doctors in the know to find out what to look out for and where to learn more locally.
NEWS
September 12, 2014
Like thousands of others across Maryland, our staff just celebrated our first Purple Friday of the season. We have a long-running office football pool, and each week a miniature traveling statue of Edgar Allan Poe - clad in a Ravens jersey - rests on the winner's desk as a trophy. Though we haven't converted every employee into a tried-and-true Ravens fan (yet), we all agree we're pleased the Ravens' coaching staff took swift action to terminate Ray Rice's contract following Monday's release of the video showing him assaulting his then-fiancée in February.
NEWS
February 13, 1992
The Dow Corning Corporation is now learning first-hand a lesson that should have been ingrained in corporate policy. Stonewalling on safety complaints to federal regulators questioning your products' potential hazards is a quick way to the trash heap. That this could happen after Johns Manville Corporation's asbestos debacle, after the Dalkon Shield fiasco bounced the A.H. Robbins Co. into bankruptcy, is astounding.Irresponsibility in high circles put Dow Corning in this position. Thus, it is a prudent move for the company to replace its top executives.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham | October 16, 2013
The Mercy soccer team is hosting its second breast cancer awareness soccer games against Institute of Notre Dame on Saturday to raise money and awareness. The event will get started at noon with the junior varsity game, followed by a Mercy alumni game and then the varsity game will take place at 3 p.m. There will be food and snowball trucks on hand and sports auction and donation tables also set up to support the cause. Those who attend are encouraged to wear pink to show support in the fight against breast cancer.
SPORTS
By Cristie Kerr, For The Baltimore Sun and By Cristie Kerr, For The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
[Editor's note: Cristie Kerr, a member of Team USA in the inaugural LPGA International Crown, to be played July 24-27 at Caves Valley Golf Club, will be blogging for The Baltimore Sun about her experience.] Hello from across the pond! We have reached the halfway point in the LPGA schedule, and there is some great golf being played by a lot of gals out here. The Ricoh Women's British Open marks our third major of the year and second major in the past three tournaments leading up to the International Crown at the end of the month.
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