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By Bill Free and Roch Kubatko and Bill Free and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2002
Beau Hale's promising road to Baltimore has hit a snag. The Orioles' No. 1 pick in the 2000 draft has lost confidence in his curveball, making him a two-pitch pitcher (fastball, changeup) for the Frederick Keys. "He needs to throw his breaking ball more," said Keys pitching coach Larry Jaster. "When he gets in trouble, he relies too much on the fastball, making it easier for the hitters." The 6-foot-2, 205-pound right-hander from Mauriceville, Texas, has lost three of his past four starts to fall to 5-6 with a 4.66 ERA. He has pitched 96 2/3 innings, tied for fourth in the Carolina League.
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By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
For the second time in his last three starts, Orioles left-hander Wei-Yin Chen gave his team a quality start of seven innings. It's no secret that the Orioles starting rotation has struggled to go deep into games, forcing the bullpen into action early. But Chen is starting to buck that trend. In Friday's 4-3 win over the Houston Astros, he allowed just two runs and five hits. He also allowed two runs over seven innings two starts ago against the Kansas City Royals. After he allowed eight earned runs in his first two outings of the season, Chen has yielded 10 earned runs in his last five starts.
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By Bob Finnigan and Bob Finnigan,Seattle Times | May 20, 1992
BOSTON -- With the Seattle Mariners looking to trade for pitching, Kevin Mitchell had an idea."Send me back to the National League, where they aren't scared to pitch to you," said the big outfielder, who spent six years with three NL teams before being swapped to Seattle this season.American League pitchers are driving Mitchell crazy, and driving him into a slump that has cost him and the Mariners oodles of runs.After coming up empty twice with two runners on base Monday against Boston, Mitchell's average with men in scoring position dipped to .132, worst among Seattle's regulars.
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By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- It was just more than two weeks ago when Steve Pearce sat hunched over his locker in Toronto, thinking his days with the Orioles were over. Since then, Pearce has been on an amazing roster roller-coaster -- designated for assignment, placed on release waivers, claimed off waivers by the Toronto Blue Jays, given free agency after denying the claim, and ultimately back in the same Orioles clubhouse. Thrust into a starting role to replace injured slugger Chris Davis, Pearce might have made the two biggest plays of the night to lead the Orioles to a 3-1 win over the Tampa Bay Rays in front of an announced 11,076 at Tropicana Field.
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June 17, 2007
Offense -- He's an aggressive fastball hitter with power. He gets in trouble when he expands the zone and hacks away at breaking balls. He's got some work to do with hitting the breaking ball. Defense -- I think he is going to stay at third base. He has adequate hands and he has done well there. He is pretty steady all around and it's going to be tough getting that job back from him. Overall -- He is a similar type of player as [Washington's] Ryan Zimmerman, but he is not as good defensively as Zimmerman.
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May 6, 2007
Hitting -- He's a guy that's somewhat generic. He is fairly easy to pitch to, but when he gets two strikes, he spreads out and gets the bat on [the] ball and gets a lot of bloop hits. You have to give him credit there. Weaknesses -- He doesn't like the breaking ball. He wants the fastball. He really doesn't have a position. He is like what a lot of clubs have. He's a six-inning guy and then you put the defense in. Future -- I would say [his ceiling] is pretty low. He's having a good run right now, but I think clubs will eventually figure him out. But he's had some success.
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By Eduardo A. Encina and Eduardo A. Encina,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1998
Although part of the Orioles' mediocrity has been attributed to the bullpen, left-hander Arthur Rhodes has been blame-free of late, establishing himself as perhaps the team's most dependable reliever.Rhodes, 28, pitched three innings of middle relief in yesterday's 7-3 loss to the Toronto Blue Jays in the series finale. Rhodes allowed just one hit and struck out three, including Shawn Green and Jose Canseco back-to-back in the seventh inning, keeping the game close.On Friday night, Rhodes also contributed a quality performance with three critical innings in the Orioles' 15-inning, 7-4 win over the Blue Jays, allowing just one hit with three more strikeouts.
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By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Sun Staff Writer | May 22, 1994
NEW YORK -- Most major-league pitchers will agree that it's difficult, if not impossible, to establish all of their pitches in the first inning.Arthur Rhodes has learned that lesson the hard way several times, most recently yesterday afternoon at Yankee Stadium.And it's a lesson he most likely will have to learn a few times at Triple-A Rochester.With Rhodes, it's a question of getting both of his pitches established, because he's basically a two-pitch pitcher -- fastball and breaking ball.
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By Buster Olney | June 15, 1995
On the field: Eddie Murray is closing in quickly on hit No. 3,000. Murray's two-out, broken-bat RBI single in the first inning was the 2,988th hit of his career, and it was his fourth hit of the series.In the dugout: The Orioles' offense is in such a funk that manager Phil Regan ordered the infield to play in with a runner on third in the second inning. At the time, Cleveland led 1-0. Regan's strategy paid off -- sort of. The infield was in with Tony Pena at the plate and Manny Ramirez on third, and Pena struck out. But the run scored anyway, when a breaking pitch by starter Scott Klingenbeck skipped past catcher Chris Hoiles.
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December 20, 1996
Data: Outfielder; bats right, throws right; age 34.Statistically speaking: After sitting out the 1995 season, Davis came back to the Reds and hit .287 with 26 homers, 83 RBIs and 23 stolen bases.Pluses: He's in excellent condition, is a good defensive outfielder and has good power. He also is known as a strong clubhouse influence and someone who always plays hard.Minuses: He has a long history of injury problems that decimated his career; at one time, Davis was regarded as a future Hall of Famer.
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By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
NEW YORK - This wasn't the first impression right-hander Ubaldo Jimenez wanted to give his new team or his new fan base, but the Orioles' top offseason acquisition has struggled through his first two starts with the club. Following the Orioles' 4-2 loss to New York in the Yankees' home opener at Yankees Stadium on Monday afternoon, Jimenez talked about being crippled by not being able to locate his breaking ball. The result was a short 4 2/3-inning outing in which he issued five walks and was chased from the game after reaching 109 pitches, the first time he didn't get out of the fifth inning in 11 starts dating back to last August.
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By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
The last time the Orioles hosted the Yankees in September at Camden Yards, Orioles right fielder Nick Markakis' season ended when a CC Sabathia fastball broke his left thumb. That event - which robbed Markakis of playing in the postseason for the first time in his career - actually happened exactly one year and one day ago.  At the time, Markakis was hitting .335 from the leadoff spot after returning from hamate bone surgery. With one pitch, Markakis went from key contributor to spectator.
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By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2013
In today's Baltimore Sun, I wrote a story on the Orioles' efforts to convert minor league pitchers Zach Clark and Eddie Gamboa into knuckleballers. Clark and Gamboa are working with Hall of Fame knuckleballer Phil Niekro, who won 318 games and revolutionized the knuckleball, while both pitchers are at Double-A Bowie. In speaking with the 74-year-old Niekro this week, you can tell he's still very passionate in teaching the knuckleball to young pitchers. He realizes that, in some ways, it can make a difference in helping a pitcher break into the majors.
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By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2013
MINNEAPOLIS - Steve Johnson might have been the best feel-good story in an Orioles season filled with them last year. The local boy, St. Paul's graduate and son of a former Oriole stormed onto the big league stage and won all four of his decisions, providing a huge boost during a pennant push. His 2013 hasn't been as smooth. It was delayed for weeks by a lat injury and, when he returned to the big leagues Saturday, he lasted just four innings in the Orioles' 8-5 loss to the Minnesota Twins before an announced 32,221 at Target Field.
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By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
TORONTO - First things first. When discussing his performance Wednesday night against the Blue Jays, Orioles right-hander Jason Hammel blamed himself and his inability to keep his fastball down against a fastball-feasting Toronto lineup. “Balls were up in the zone, open roof tonight, ball was flying a little bit,” Hammel said after the Orioles' 4-1 loss to Toronto at the Rogers Centre. “You put two and two together.” In his next breath, Hammel proposed a theory well beyond basic math.
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By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2010
Kansas City Royals first baseman Billy Butler cost Brad Bergesen the last two months of his rookie season and a possible run at the American League Rookie of the Year award when he nailed the Orioles starter in the left leg with a line drive. Exactly a year and one day since that injury, which took the young pitcher months to recover from, Butler cost Bergesen a long-awaited victory that he deserved. Asked to protect a one-run lead in the eighth inning, David Hernandez served up a tape-measure two-run homer to Butler, who sent the Royals to a 4-3 victory Saturday night in a brisk two hours, nine minutes in front of an announced 25,055 at Kauffman Stadium.
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By BILL ORDINE | August 30, 2007
What if comedian Bob Newhart were the bullpen coach who answered the telephone when Orioles manager Dave Trembley called for help Tuesday night? "RRRRIIINNNGGG: Hello, Orioles bullpen, it's your dime. Oh, hi, Dave, how are you? Oh, not so good, huh. Sorry to hear that Dave. ... Yeah, we can hear the booing out here, too. Well, you know what I say - just as long as they stay in the stands (chuckle). ... No, I guess it's not so funny. ... So, what can we do you for you, Dave? ... You need a pitcher?
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By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writer | July 18, 1992
Mike Mussina came close to pitching a no-hitter last night. Close enough to measure with a yardstick. Close enough that the Texas Rangers had nothing to offer in their own defense but the praise they sung for one of the best young pitchers in baseball."
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,Sun reporter | July 5, 2008
Orioles reliever Chris Ray, recovering from ligament reconstruction in his right elbow, pitched a simulated game Wednesday after throwing two batting practice sessions earlier. But manager Dave Trembley indicated that Ray isn't close to appearing in a real game. "He'll just continue his throwing program and mound progression," Trembley said. "He has not been slowed down." Ray remains at the minor league complex in Sarasota, Fla. His goal since spring training has been to rejoin the Orioles by late August or early September, though that might not be realistic.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,Sun reporter | March 1, 2008
JUPITER, Fla. -- Florida Marlins pitchers have been instructed to throw only fastballs and changeups in the early portion of the exhibition schedule, but Orioles starter Steve Trachsel wasn't working with those limitations yesterday. He used everything in his repertoire, and the Marlins couldn't do much with any of it. Trachsel threw two scoreless innings in his spring debut, allowing one hit and striking out one. Nineteen of his 29 pitches were strikes. The Marlins didn't get a ball out of the infield except for Luis Gonzalez's soft single to left field leading off the second inning.
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