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By Jon Morgan | March 5, 1999
Cal Ripken's new cereal, scheduled to debut next month, will be called Cal's Crunchy O's.Jason Bauer, president of Famous Fixins, the company marketing the breakfast cereal, said the name was decided upon this week following negotiations with the Orioles and Major League Baseball.Ripken will not, however, be able to wear his Orioles uniform on the cover, Bauer said. Major League Baseball owns the rights to team logos and uniforms. Ripken will instead be depicted in a special "Ripken" uniform he used for his winter fantasy camp.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2012
Zach Phillips keeps a few lucky quarters in his pocket. Pedro Strop wears Ninja Turtle boxers. And Jason Hammel - well, it got so extreme that he had to swear off the whole superstition thing. It was, he says, a distraction. "Yeah, I've actually gotten away from that," says Hammel, the Orioles right-hander who was among the league's elite pitchers this season until a recurring knee injury forced him onto the disabled list for much of the second half. "I used to do superstitions - where I went to eat, when I left to go eat, the way I put my socks on, wearing the same pair of underwear for each start.
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FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | September 17, 1998
LET ME BEGIN by saying that I bow to no man in my reverence for Oreos, which are the finest cookies ever made and which rank up there with the cotton gin, the light bulb and polio vaccine in terms of their impact on this country.For the record, I've been happily eating Oreos since the Cuban Missile Crisis.And, as a long-time fan, I've naturally perfected the essential technique for maximum enjoyment: dunk Oreo in milk, break in half, scrape the creamy white filling off with teeth, eat chocolate cookie, dunk other cookie (optional)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 15, 2009
Ravens fever is spreading fast, and it's not only football fans who are becoming infected. Yep, even those who don't give a darn about football, who wonder if Ray Lewis is Jerry's brother and think Flacco sounds like some sort of weird breakfast cereal ... even they can't help but be swept up in the excitement that overwhelms a town when its football team is one step away from the Super Bowl. Even Orioles fans with only orange and black in their veins are starting to bleed a little purple.
FEATURES
By Becky Batcha and Becky Batcha,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 29, 1992
What did overworked working people make for dinner in the 1980s? That's easy: reservations.But that particular fast-food option has gone the way of positive economic growth and infinite credit lines. So what do the time-crunched make now that they're too broke to eat out?Cap'n Crunch, for one.But more often Wheaties or Cheerios. Or, on evenings of indulgence, Frosted Flakes.In the '90s, what many worn-out yuppies with maxed-out credit cards make for dinner is breakfast cereal. Just add milk and serve.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1998
Who would have thought that after Cookie Gilchrist and Jack Kemp, after O. J. Simpson and Paul Maguire, after Marv Levy and Jim Kelly, there would be Doug Flutie?America's reclaimed sweetheart. Canada's adopt- ed son. Everyman's hero.A 36-year-old backup quarterback joining the long list of Buffalo's most revered Bills from eras past.Flutie Fever has gripped Buffalo just as certainly as the snowdrifts that soon will start appearing along Lake Erie. And the contagion was building before Flutie fueled the Bills' 17-16 upset of previously undefeated Jacksonville last week in his first NFL start in nine years.
NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 25, 2001
CANADA AND THE Bahamas might be the extent of Sean Conaboy's travels, but his knowledge of places far and away has earned him the top place in New Windsor Middle School's geography bee. The school conducted its first geography bee last year after the National Geographic Society, which sponsors the event, sent a flier to the school encouraging participation, according to Carroll Seiler, a social studies teacher of 10 years who helped pupils organize the...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 15, 2009
Ravens fever is spreading fast, and it's not only football fans who are becoming infected. Yep, even those who don't give a darn about football, who wonder if Ray Lewis is Jerry's brother and think Flacco sounds like some sort of weird breakfast cereal ... even they can't help but be swept up in the excitement that overwhelms a town when its football team is one step away from the Super Bowl. Even Orioles fans with only orange and black in their veins are starting to bleed a little purple.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff | May 23, 1999
Forget the multimillion-dollar contract, the 21-room mansion and the four-wheel-drive Lincoln Navigator in the driveway. The real measure of jock superstardom these days is this: Does the big, sweaty goof have his own breakfast cereal? Following on the heels of Buffalo Bills quarterback Doug Flutie's hugely successful "Flutie Flakes," Cal Ripken's "Cal's Classic O's" and Albert Belle's "Slugger Cereal" are hitting area supermarket shelves. And, like Flutie's cereal, a portion of the sales is earmarked for charity.
NEWS
By Claudia Smith Brinson | October 16, 1998
EVERY NOW and then a bit of information just leaps out at you as commentary on "the way we live." So I've been thinking about cereal this week and cringing.It seems the snap-crackle-pop of vitamin-fortified cereals may be all that stands between some of our children and malnutrition. Breakfast cereal is the No. 1 source for children of vitamin A, vitamin C, iron and folate, according to a study published this month in Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics."It appears that breakfast cereals are acting as a dietary supplement as well as a food," reported Amy Subar.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2005
Shares of Martek Biosciences Corp. rose nearly 13 percent yesterday after news that the Kellogg Co. plans to fortify food with one of the Columbia biotech's products as early as next year. Martek announced the deal yesterday morning, but only described the partner as a Fortune 500 consumer-product food company. Kellogg, the Battle Creek, Mich., company that is the nation's top breakfast cereal manufacturer, was revealed as the company in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | August 1, 2004
I have received a disturbing letter from Mr. Frank J. Phillips, who describes himself as both a patriot and a Latin teacher. I didn't realize we still had Latin teachers, but I'm glad we do, because contrary to what you think (and as a member of the news media, I know exactly what you think) Latin is not just an old dead language spoken by old dead guys who are no longer relevant because they are old and dead. In fact, Latin is the "mother tongue" (or "alma mater") of our own language (English)
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2004
At a Glen Burnie 7-Eleven, Michael Kropkowski pulled the Diet Pepsi lever of the store's Slurpee-maker and watched as the cola-colored, icy slush climbed the sides of his tall, clear cup and filled the dome-shaped lid. A long straw topped off his creation. It might not be a cure for cancer, but it represented a sweet moment for a small Beltsville biotechnology firm that has spent years developing Tagatose, the low-calorie sugar substitute it contains. After years of struggles, Spherix Inc. is getting its first big shot at market acceptance.
NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 25, 2001
CANADA AND THE Bahamas might be the extent of Sean Conaboy's travels, but his knowledge of places far and away has earned him the top place in New Windsor Middle School's geography bee. The school conducted its first geography bee last year after the National Geographic Society, which sponsors the event, sent a flier to the school encouraging participation, according to Carroll Seiler, a social studies teacher of 10 years who helped pupils organize the...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff | May 23, 1999
Forget the multimillion-dollar contract, the 21-room mansion and the four-wheel-drive Lincoln Navigator in the driveway. The real measure of jock superstardom these days is this: Does the big, sweaty goof have his own breakfast cereal? Following on the heels of Buffalo Bills quarterback Doug Flutie's hugely successful "Flutie Flakes," Cal Ripken's "Cal's Classic O's" and Albert Belle's "Slugger Cereal" are hitting area supermarket shelves. And, like Flutie's cereal, a portion of the sales is earmarked for charity.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan | March 5, 1999
Cal Ripken's new cereal, scheduled to debut next month, will be called Cal's Crunchy O's.Jason Bauer, president of Famous Fixins, the company marketing the breakfast cereal, said the name was decided upon this week following negotiations with the Orioles and Major League Baseball.Ripken will not, however, be able to wear his Orioles uniform on the cover, Bauer said. Major League Baseball owns the rights to team logos and uniforms. Ripken will instead be depicted in a special "Ripken" uniform he used for his winter fantasy camp.
FEATURES
By Kim Pierce and Kim Pierce,Universal Press Syndicate | October 12, 1994
From TV ads to eye-level store displays, kids get the message to buy and eat high-fat, sugar, processed foods -- not exactly the building blocks of good nutrition.And although government, consumer groups and the food and TV industries have begun looking at ways to channel more nutrition information to kids, most experts agree parents are still the food gatekeepers -- at home, at stores, in restaurants.Good -- or poor -- nutrition and eating habits form early, they say. Lifetime habits are set by age 12. And parents play a big role in establishing good habits.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | March 24, 1992
In a 1988 interview with Gentlemen's Quarterly, Chicago Bulls hTC superstar Michael Jordan said he had experienced nightmares of self-destruction.Recalling his dreams, Jordan said: "It's always something I've done. I have robbed a bank. Or I have done cocaine. I have succumbed to the pressure of drugs. . . . They're nightmares of something terrible happening to me that would destroy a lot of people's dreams or conceptions of me -- that's the biggest nightmare I live every day."But Jordan's nightmares have become a reality.
FEATURES
By Jenn William and Jenn William,Contributing Writer | February 10, 1999
The Quaker Oats Co. recently challenged individuals to stretch their imaginations and create tasty, innovative recipes using oatmeal for its ninth annual Bake It Better With Oatmeal Contest. Although oatmeal may be regarded as a humdrum breakfast cereal by some people, winners of the baking contest demonstrated the potential of the grain in recipes that ranged from imaginative breads and cookies to a low-fat fruit crisp. The grand-prize winner, Marie Rizzio of Traverse City, Mich.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1998
Who would have thought that after Cookie Gilchrist and Jack Kemp, after O. J. Simpson and Paul Maguire, after Marv Levy and Jim Kelly, there would be Doug Flutie?America's reclaimed sweetheart. Canada's adopt- ed son. Everyman's hero.A 36-year-old backup quarterback joining the long list of Buffalo's most revered Bills from eras past.Flutie Fever has gripped Buffalo just as certainly as the snowdrifts that soon will start appearing along Lake Erie. And the contagion was building before Flutie fueled the Bills' 17-16 upset of previously undefeated Jacksonville last week in his first NFL start in nine years.
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