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Break The Cycle

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By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1998
Maryland's new "Break the Cycle" drug program, which requires felons on probation and parole to submit to drug tests as often as twice a week, was officially initiated yesterday in Howard County.Under the county initiative, drug addicts on probation and parole who don't test clean for drugs or who miss treatment appointments will be quickly punished with brief jail terms or community service.The "Break the Cycle" program -- crafted by Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend -- aims to decrease drug addiction and reduce "quality of life" crimes such as petty theft committed by addicts.
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NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | January 4, 2009
Purnell Parker remembers when his drug addiction was so bad that he ate nothing but peanut brittle for an entire summer because he was broke. But for more than a year, Parker has not used drugs. The 38-year-old Baltimore man wears a medallion that serves as a symbol of his recovery and to remind him of his new life - along with a seemingly perpetual smile. And after getting the upper hand on his dependency, he says, he is resolved to help others facing the same struggle. "When I was using, if you couldn't tell me where the next best corner was, I didn't have [anything]
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NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1998
Maryland's new "Break the Cycle" drug program, which requires felons on probation and parole to submit to drug tests as often as twice a week, was officially initiated yesterday in Howard County.Under the initiative, drug addicts on probation and parole who don't test clean for drugs or who miss treatment appointments will be quickly punished with brief jail terms or will be forced to perform community service.The "Break the Cycle" program -- crafted by Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend -- aims to decrease drug addiction and reduce "quality of life" crimes such as petty theft committed by addicts.
NEWS
By Carl Tobias | January 17, 2007
Bipartisanship is the byword as President Bush embarks on his final two years and Congress convenes with the first Democratic majorities since 1994. Once the 110th Congress assembled, the president had an excellent opportunity to cooperate with Democrats through the nomination of candidates for the 56 lower court openings. Mr. Bush demonstrated his commitment to bipartisanship by not renominating several controversial appellate nominees last week. For much of the Bush administration, partisanship and divisiveness have punctuated the judicial selection process, especially for appeals courts.
NEWS
December 6, 1997
CRIME RATES are falling across the nation, in part because some common-sense approaches are finally being used. Take for instance, Maryland's Break the Cycle program announced this week. It will require convicted felons on probation or parole to submit to drug tests as often as twice a week.Any beat patrolman knows the bulk of burglaries and robberies involves addicts who need cash to pay for their habit. Most have been in trouble with the law before, many are still on probation or parole.
NEWS
November 20, 2000
IT WOULD be political dynamite to touch. But Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend's Break the Cycle anti-drug initiative must be reshaped if Maryland wants to overhaul its dysfunctional probation system. Instead of prison, her innovative pilot program was supposed to offer 9,000 addicted but nonviolent offenders a life free of drugs and criminal behavior. Treatment, not incarceration, was the idea. For taxpayers and citizens, it was supposed to provide greater public safety -- and cost savings.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2000
The union representing probation agents will ask state officials next week to suspend a new supervision program in Silver Spring because of understaffing. The request comes after an agent was suspended from her job without pay for 10 days for failing to report the man being sought in the slaying of a Maryland state trooper, though the man had violated terms of his probation 72 times, according to state officials. Officials of the American Federation of State, City and Municipal Employees, which represents the agent, maintain the state Division of Parole and Probation does not have enough workers in the Montgomery County office to oversee the offenders in the new Break the Cycle program.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JENNIFER SULLIVAN and JENNIFER SULLIVAN,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | May 3, 1999
To ease the confusion victims feel after being the target of a crime, the Maryland Department of Public Safety has created the first comprehensive Web site listing victim services statewide.There had been no single source of this kind of information, according to Leonard A. Sipes, the department's spokesman.Stuart O. Simms, Secretary of Public Safety and Correctional Services, said the department is trying to restructure its focus so that it deals not only with law enforcement agencies and criminals, but victims, too.In addition to providing victims with descriptions of services at the local, state and national level -- along with the phone numbers of the agencies involved -- the Web site offers direct links to Hotspots, Break the Cycle, D.A.R.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2000
Half the drug addicts referred for treatment under the state's vaunted "Break the Cycle" program fail to show up for their first appointment but face no punishment, a veteran Baltimore treatment program director said at a congressional hearing yesterday. "They say, `You must go to treatment. You must take a urine test.' But if you don't do it, nothing happens," said George McCann, executive director of Addict Referral and Counseling Center on 25th Street. "Hundreds of these people are falling through the cracks.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2001
As the cries for vengeance and retaliation grow after Tuesday's terrorist attacks in New York and Washington, a small but determined portion of the faith community is calling for a nonviolent response. Pacifist groups are calling on the nation and its policymakers to express their anger peacefully. American Friends Service Committee, the social-action arm of the Quakers, urged Americans to "break the cycle of violence and retribution." The committee has begun a "No More Victims" campaign to support victims and survivors, to seek peaceful solutions to acts of hatred and to stand with Arab and Muslim communities.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | November 21, 2006
You see it all the time in crime stories: "The victim was taken to Shock Trauma ... " That is where Javaughn Norman Adams, 18, is recovering from wounds received Saturday when - during a fight at the Annapolis mall - he allegedly shot an off-duty Secret Service agent who was trying to break up the melee, and the officer returned fire. While the mall shooting has generated much attention, Adams' case is another day at the office for one group of staffers at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 10, 2006
Alittle more attention must be paid: Keith Harrison, The Sun's Police Officer of the Year for excellence in community service, has been deeply engaged in the effort to get drug dealers and drug addicts out of that miserable game. We kind of missed the story the other day when we reported on Harrison's selection from among dozens of nominees across Maryland. He's done more than "set up an office where citizens can talk privately to officers about their lives." Like street-corner missionaries, Harrison and his colleagues from the Baltimore Police Department's Get Out of the Game unit have been encouraging hard-core drug offenders to change their lives.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2005
When the 4-month-old girl came to Michael and Carol Clemmens, her arms, legs and pelvis were fractured. For six months, the couple changed the child's bandages every day and cradled her as she descended into fretful sleep. When the girl's father was sentenced for abusing her, the foster parents testified on the infant's behalf. "They loved her like their own," said Anne Arundel County victim advocate Cindy Haworth. "So different from the abuse she had suffered most of her life." The little girl is now 2 1/2 and fully healthy, and Michael and Carol Clemmens have another foster child, the latest in a line of 13 abused children who have come into their Sherwood Forest home for months at a time over the past three years.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | December 28, 1992
In an effort to break the cycle that lands some deadbeat dads in jail for failing to pay child support, the county has asked business leaders to help find ways to provide the men with job training and work skills.A task force of county officials and local business people will target unemployed fathers whose children receive welfare payments through the county's Department of Social Services. The partnership is one way to involve the private sector in the reform of welfare policies, said County Executive Robert R. Neall.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2002
Kathleen Kennedy Townsend calls herself the most active and accomplished lieutenant governor in Maryland history. She spent the past eight years crafting a reputation as a champion of safer neighborhoods, overseeing a portfolio of criminal justice programs ceded to her by Gov. Parris N. Glendening. For her effort, she almost universally wins high marks from observers, who find her a committed and passionate advocate for crime-fighting causes. Her grades for execution, however, are more varied - often colored by political allegiances.
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