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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1996
A lost recipe rises. Greek bread made in a bread machine was the request of Betty Zillmer of Crystal Lake, Ill. who lost the recipe during a move. "It had feta cheese, cucumbers and olives and I hope you can locate it for me."Mission accomplished, thanks to Ruth F. McHenry of Baltimore and Pauline Okrae of Spring Grove, Ill. who sent in identical recipes for a large and a small size bread. Chef Gilles Syglowski chose the smaller size.Greek bread1/2 cup water2 cups white bread flour3 tablespoons plain yogurt2 teaspoon dry milk1 teaspoon saltpinch garlic powder4 teaspoons black olives, finely chopped1/2 teaspoon basil1/2 teaspoon dill weed2 1/2 tablespoons feta cheese, drained2 1/2 tablespoons cucumbers, peeled, seeded and pureed1/2 teaspoon fast rise or 1 teaspoon active dry yeastAdd ingredients to your bread machine in order given and process according to the machine instructions.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2011
A bearded lady, a flock of prostitutes, a machine that supposedly turns stones into bread — just a few of the off-kilter elements in "The Rake's Progress," the brilliant opera with music by Igor Stravinsky. Widely viewed as a masterwork since its premiere in Venice in 1951, but not staged with great frequency, the piece provides a vehicle for Peabody Opera Theatre's first production in the Modell Center at the Lyric. "It's exciting to help contribute to the season that is bringing grand opera back to Baltimore," said Peabody Institute director Jeffrey Sharkey.
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By Cathy Barber and Cathy Barber,Universal Press Syndicate | December 4, 1994
Ah, the holidays: Time to recoup that big bread-machine investment by baking bread for everyone you know.Your trusty machine can turn out a loaf every three or four hours, practically around the clock. All it requires is a cool-down between loaves. Or you can make optimum use of the dough cycle and bake your creations in a regular oven, cutting the time even more.Ada L. Lai of Moss Beach, Calif., tests machines and recipes for the Magic Bread Letter, a newsletter she produces. Her first machine gave out last year after baking some 500 loaves in less than three years.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD AND BRITTANY BAUHAUS and LIZ ATWOOD AND BRITTANY BAUHAUS,SUN REPORTERS | November 23, 2005
You say you're too busy to put together a Thanksgiving meal from scratch? After all, tomorrow is the day and you haven't even baked a pie. Well, you may have good reasons not to cook a traditional Thanksgiving dinner, but time shouldn't be one of them. Although all the books tell you to begin preparations days in advance, the biggest meal of the year really can be made in just a few hours. If you shop today, you can watch the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in the morning and still have turkey and all the trimmings ready before the kickoff of the Dallas-Denver football game at 4 p.m. "It's definitely workable," says Tom Schwarzweller, executive chef at Wegmans in Hunt Valley.
FEATURES
By Dotty Griffith and Dotty Griffith,Dallas Morning News Universal Press Syndicate | September 1, 1993
Check the weather report before you load your bread machine.Humidity usually is the biggest problem when using a bread machine. That's the word from Linda West Eckhardt, author and bread machine expert.She tested the major brands of bread machines when she was researching her award-winning cookbook, "Bread in Half the Time" (Crown Publishing Group, $25).Learning the quirks of your machine and climate is important, she says. It is a fallacy, she adds, to think that a bread machine works like a car -- you can't just put flour in it and go.Making bread by machine is a new craft.
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By Dallas Morning NewsUniversal Press Syndicate | January 20, 1993
If you found a breadmaking machine in your stockin Christmas morning, congratulations! Modern-day technology has conquered the old-fashioned art of breadmaking.Here are some recipes you might want to try, all from "The Best Bread Machine Cookbook Ever" by Madge Rosenberg (Harper & Row, $15.95).Mozzarella and sun-dried tomato breadMakes one 1 1-pound1 1/2 teaspoons active dry yeast1 3/4 cups bread flour1 tablespoon sugar1 teaspoon salt1 tablespoon olive oil1/3 cup chopped sun-dried tomatoes1/2 cup water1/3 cup cubed mozzarella cheeseAdd all ingredients except the mozzarella cheese in the order suggested by your bread machine manual and process on the basic bread cycle according to the manufacturer's directions.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | June 9, 1999
* Item: Pillsbury Homestyle Loaf* What you get: One 9-by-5-inch loaf of bread* Cost: About $1.79* Preparation time: 50 to 60 minutes* Review: Although the hourlong prep time might seem daunting, keep in mind how long it takes to make bread from scratch (or even with a bread machine) when you buy Pillsbury's newest refrigerated dough. Suddenly, an hour for fresh bread doesn't seem like such a long wait. The dough is easy to use: Pop it out of the tube into a greased loaf pan and right into the oven.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert jTC and Rita Calvert jTC,Special to The Sun | March 1, 1995
Q: I am trying to have a healthier diet. I recently saw on a cooking show an instructor line a baking pan with wax paper. Can this help eliminate the calories from greasing with butter and then flouring?A: It's most likely the baking pan was being lined with parchment paper, which is now used more frequently than waxed paper to prevent sticking in baking. This treatment can reduce the fat and flour calories that are used to prevent baked goods from sticking. However, you still need to use some Bakers Joy or vegetable spray coating to prevent sticking.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | December 20, 1992
It has to be noted at the outset: the least expensive machine took top honors in both categories at the bread-machine taste-off organized by Dr. Marianne Felice and her colleagues and students at the School of Social Work at the University of Maryland at Baltimore. And the homemade bread ranked lowest.Experience may have played a role, however. Dr. Drew Bernstein, a pediatrician, said he's had his DAK bread machine for about three years. "I'm one of the early pioneers," he jokes. But he adds, "I love bread.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,sun staff | January 6, 1999
Jareene Barkdall of Baltimore requested a recipe for English muffin bread. It makes the best toast, she wrote. She wanted to prepare it in a bread machine, but none of the responses received included instructions for a bread machine.Tester Laura Reiley chose a recipe sent in by Jeannie Rand of Walla Walla, Wash., who wrote: ``I don't know if this bread could be made in an electric bread maker or not. I have never tried. The recipe came from 'Better Homes & Gardens Homemade Bread Cook Book.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | June 9, 1999
* Item: Pillsbury Homestyle Loaf* What you get: One 9-by-5-inch loaf of bread* Cost: About $1.79* Preparation time: 50 to 60 minutes* Review: Although the hourlong prep time might seem daunting, keep in mind how long it takes to make bread from scratch (or even with a bread machine) when you buy Pillsbury's newest refrigerated dough. Suddenly, an hour for fresh bread doesn't seem like such a long wait. The dough is easy to use: Pop it out of the tube into a greased loaf pan and right into the oven.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,sun staff | January 6, 1999
Jareene Barkdall of Baltimore requested a recipe for English muffin bread. It makes the best toast, she wrote. She wanted to prepare it in a bread machine, but none of the responses received included instructions for a bread machine.Tester Laura Reiley chose a recipe sent in by Jeannie Rand of Walla Walla, Wash., who wrote: ``I don't know if this bread could be made in an electric bread maker or not. I have never tried. The recipe came from 'Better Homes & Gardens Homemade Bread Cook Book.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1996
A lost recipe rises. Greek bread made in a bread machine was the request of Betty Zillmer of Crystal Lake, Ill. who lost the recipe during a move. "It had feta cheese, cucumbers and olives and I hope you can locate it for me."Mission accomplished, thanks to Ruth F. McHenry of Baltimore and Pauline Okrae of Spring Grove, Ill. who sent in identical recipes for a large and a small size bread. Chef Gilles Syglowski chose the smaller size.Greek bread1/2 cup water2 cups white bread flour3 tablespoons plain yogurt2 teaspoon dry milk1 teaspoon saltpinch garlic powder4 teaspoons black olives, finely chopped1/2 teaspoon basil1/2 teaspoon dill weed2 1/2 tablespoons feta cheese, drained2 1/2 tablespoons cucumbers, peeled, seeded and pureed1/2 teaspoon fast rise or 1 teaspoon active dry yeastAdd ingredients to your bread machine in order given and process according to the machine instructions.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert jTC and Rita Calvert jTC,Special to The Sun | March 1, 1995
Q: I am trying to have a healthier diet. I recently saw on a cooking show an instructor line a baking pan with wax paper. Can this help eliminate the calories from greasing with butter and then flouring?A: It's most likely the baking pan was being lined with parchment paper, which is now used more frequently than waxed paper to prevent sticking in baking. This treatment can reduce the fat and flour calories that are used to prevent baked goods from sticking. However, you still need to use some Bakers Joy or vegetable spray coating to prevent sticking.
FEATURES
By Cathy Barber and Cathy Barber,Universal Press Syndicate | December 4, 1994
Ah, the holidays: Time to recoup that big bread-machine investment by baking bread for everyone you know.Your trusty machine can turn out a loaf every three or four hours, practically around the clock. All it requires is a cool-down between loaves. Or you can make optimum use of the dough cycle and bake your creations in a regular oven, cutting the time even more.Ada L. Lai of Moss Beach, Calif., tests machines and recipes for the Magic Bread Letter, a newsletter she produces. Her first machine gave out last year after baking some 500 loaves in less than three years.
FEATURES
By Pat Dailey and Pat Dailey,Chicago Tribune | April 6, 1994
There hasn't been a convention of bread-machine users yet, but there are a lot of products, books and services to keep them amused and informed. Here are some:* The Bread Machine Newsletter (six times a year): Starting its third year, this 12-page publication is a forum for exchange of ideas, hints and recipes. For a free sample issue (send a self-addressed, stamped, business-size envelope) or to subscribe, write Donna German, Suite 3, 976 Houston Northcutt Blvd., Mount Pleasant, S.C. 29464.
NEWS
By Clarinda Harriss Raymond | June 16, 1993
NEVER consider wasted the time you spend sleeping." These were words of advice to beginning schoolteachers from Dr. Pauline Rutledge, an inspirational department chair at Towson State Teachers' College (now Towson State University, where I've taught for the past twentysome years).I inherited them from my mother, a Towson State graduate and lifelong educator in Baltimore City schools. Dr. Rutledge's wise admonition was something I needed to hear -- I've repeated it to myself often during my own lifetime as a teacher -- but I've always found it hard to heed.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | January 19, 1992
A little bundle of joy came to my house recently. It weighs about 8 pounds and just fits in my arms.That's right, I bought a bread machine.I didn't plan on it. I don't usually buy such things. I managed to avoid the entire decade of the '80s without buying a pasta maker.But a few days ago, I needed some coffee filters and I was in a shopping mall and so I ducked into one of those upscale kitchen stores, the kind with bare wood floors and hanging copper pots and wire baskets filled with gadgets.
FEATURES
By Pat Dailey and Pat Dailey,Chicago Tribune | April 6, 1994
"Hey, what do you know? This is kind of neat."These are the words muttered by a skeptical appliance executive shortly before millions of bread machines found their way into American kitchens.Tom Lacalamita, of Welbilt, a New Jersey home appliance company, was sent home one weekend in 1988 with a bulky machine a colleague had toted back from Japan. Rumor had it that it made bread. Mixed it, kneaded it, shaped it, let it rise and baked it."Before I took it home, I didn't find it appealing to do something in a machine that we do so well by hand.
FEATURES
By Isabel Forgang and Isabel Forgang,New York Daily News | December 12, 1993
One of the chief excuses for not making bread is the lack of time. But with a bread machine, you can throw the ingredients in the appliance in the morning, go off to work, and come home to a fresh-baked loaf ready for dinner.As bread machines grow in popularity, so does the number of cookbooks written to help you take advantage of them. Here is a roundup of the best we've seen.* "The Ultimate Bread Machine Cookbook," by Tom Lacalamita (Simon & Schuster. $25): A bread baker for years, Mr. Lacalamita was skeptical when, in 1987, his boss brought home a bread machine from Japan and asked him to check it out. How could a machine duplicate the hands-on skills needed to make bread, Mr. Lacalamita wondered.
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