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NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 22, 2003
Save the money you spend on store-bought bread crumbs by making your own at home. Leftover hunks of bread made without preservatives tend to harden after a day or two, so they make good candidates for pulverizing into bread crumbs in a blender or food processor. Softer supermarket sandwich loaves will require drying in a 225-degree oven for about 10 minutes before slices become hard enough to pulse into dry crumbs. Store bread crumbs in an airtight container or food storage bag for up to two weeks at room temperature or 2 months in the freezer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman,
For The Baltimore Sun
| August 28, 2013
Kathy Stumer from Tuscarora, Pa., was looking for a recipe that her husband's grandmother used to make and called cheese dough. She described it as pillow-like dough squares filled with cottage cheese and topped with breadcrumbs and sour cream. Linda Ziegenbein from Prineville, Ore., saw Stumer's request, which sounded to her like a description of kase knoephla, or cheese dumplings or buttons - an old-style German dish of tender noodle dough stuffed with seasoned cheese. She shared a recipe from the Kulm, N.D., Dorcas Society's 25th anniversary cookbook, circa 1971, submitted by Matilda Brost.
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NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | June 23, 2002
Q. I want to try a couple of recipes that call for Japanese bread crumbs, but have had a hard time finding this product. Do they have another name? Where can I buy them? Can I substitute something else for them? A. This trendy Japanese item is also known as panko bread crumbs. They have become very in over the past 10 years and, as with all things that become popular, they have become overused. I knew that line had been crossed when I saw "Panko-Crusted Southern Fried Chicken" on a menu.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
Want to try something so old it's new again, but afraid you might end up with something strange on your plate? Use this glossary to determine which old-fashioned crab recipes might whet your appetite. Crab cakes: This Maryland staple is simple: crab meat mixed with a few ingredients, such as mayonnaise, bread crumbs and Old Bay, for seasoning and binding (aka "filler"), shaped into a patty, then broiled or fried. Crab casserole: Crab mixed with several other ingredients, including binders like mayonnaise and egg, spread in a baking dish and baked.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | September 12, 1999
I thought I had tried every variation on the quintessential American crab cake, but a few days ago while dining in Northampton, Mass., I sampled yet another version. This particular crab cake was like no other I had tried. The outside was crisp and golden, while the texture inside was as light as a feather. But the taste was the most alluring feature. There was a perfect spiciness to complement the sweetness of the shellfish, and a delectable sauce, piquant yet not overpowering, made a fine accompaniment.
NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,Newsday | May 23, 2007
I have a problem with crab cakes. I have been using the recipe on the back of the Old Bay Seasoning container, and the cakes always fall apart. I've tried more/less eggs, more/less bread, more/less crab, etc. Crab cakes present all sorts of frying problems because of their moist constitution and irregular surface. I am ever mindful of the sage advice of my cooking idol, Marcella Hazan: "Wet things won't brown." To that, I add: "Wet things won't allow the formation of a sturdy enough crust to keep the thing from falling apart."
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | July 31, 1991
PREPARE SOME Maryland seafood, serve it with locally grown vegetables and toast the meal with a glass of wine from one of the state's several vineyards, and what do you have? You've got "Maryland's in Season" a month-long promotion touting state-grown seafood, produce and wine.The promotion is being sponsored by The Restaurant Association of Maryland, the Association of Maryland Wineries and the Maryland Department of Agriculture."By the end of the program, diners will realize how much of the food they order comes from right here in Maryland" said Marcia Harris, executive vice president for the restaurant association.
FEATURES
May 15, 1991
Canned salmon, a staple in many cupboards, takes on a new air of sophistication with the simple addition of fresh grated ginger, aromatic cilantro and savory green onions. The salmon mixture is formed into small patties and lightly sauteed to a golden brown and then presented on a bed of mixed salad greens in a sweet and tangy orange-ginger vinaigrette. This recipe is from the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute.Pacific Rim Salmon1 can (15 1/2 ounces) salmon1 cup dry bread crumbs1/2 cup sliced green onions2 tablespoons chopped cilantro1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger3 egg whitesAdditional dry bread crumbs, for coatingVegetable oil, for frying6 to 8 cups mixed salad greensOrange-ginger vinaigrette, recipe follows.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL AND JANE STERN and MICHAEL AND JANE STERN,Universal Press Syndicate | May 19, 1991
NEBRASKA CITY, Neb. -- On U.S. 75 just east of Nebraska City, heading into town, look carefully on your right. See that old gray gas station? It isn't a gas station any more. It is Ulbrick's, home of fried chicken dinners extraordinaire.The cause for regular customers' affection is simple, and can be expressed in three words: fried chicken dinners. We thought about shortening it to two words -- fried chicken -- which is moist and succulent inside its well-seasoned, golden-crisp crust, cooked in pure lard in a big old skillet.
NEWS
By Joe Gray. and Joe Gray.,Chicago Tribune | September 12, 2007
A recent lunch with my former Italian instructor led to talk of good food and her memory of a favorite dish made by her mother. The dish sounded like a great candidate for a quick weeknight dinner, so I immediately asked for the recipe. Susan Pezzino said her Sicilian mother used to make this pasta dish using beefsteak tomatoes. The tomato is partially cored, stuffed, then baked. It then forms the sauce for pasta. She would serve it in individual baking dishes doused with olive oil and sprinkled with bread crumbs before baking.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2010
Edna Jonkoniec from Clinton, Maine, was looking for a recipe for making meatloaf that was rolled jelly-roll style. She said the roll also contained potatoes, cheese and other ingredients. She lost the recipe in a move some years ago and wanted to be able to make it again for her family. Carol Owen from Havre de Grace sent in a recipe she had that sounded very much like what Jonkoniec was in search of. It is fairly easy to make as long as you allow time for the loaf to chill before attempting to slice it. When I tested it, I used store-bought mashed potatoes, which was a big time-saver.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | December 10, 2008
Tuna Noodle Casserole is a comforting family classic. This made-over version from a new EatingWell cookbook shaves calories and fat and speeds preparation. As a one-pot meal, it also fit our budget for a family of four, with some left over for another night. shopping list Egg noodles: $1.36 Olive oil: 17 cents Onion: 50 cents Mushrooms: $2.29 Wine: $1.28 Flour: 8 cents Milk: 52 cents Tuna: $2 Peas: 64 cents Cheese: $1.74 Bread crumbs: 40 cents From the pantry: salt, pepper TOTAL: $10.98* Note: Prices are calculated based on the amounts used in the recipe.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | October 8, 2008
I find myself paging through my mother's recipes when I'm stumped for an economical meal these days. This meatloaf, with its sweet-spicy glaze, evokes pleasant memories, and the price is right, especially when ground beef is on sale. (When it is, buy ahead and freeze the meat.) Leftovers make great sandwiches on pieces of toasted whole-wheat bread. shopping list Wine: $1.25 Ground beef : $5.88 Bread crumbs: 50 cents Onion: 50 cents Eggs: 33 cents Ketchup: 61 cents Brown sugar: 36 cents Vinegar: 27 cents Dry mustard: 25 cents From the pantry: salt, pepper TOTAL:$ 9.95* *Note: Prices are calculated based on the amounts used in the recipe.
NEWS
By Regina Schrambling and Regina Schrambling,Los Angeles Times | May 14, 2008
Gratins have a bit of seasonal affective disorder. They turn up in fall and winter but disappear when the sun comes back out in springtime. That is surprising considering how well everything at peak of green right now goes with cheese and sauce, and how easily a quick pass through the oven makes them all rich and bubbly together. Asparagus, artichokes, green garlic, dandelions, even not-so-green new potatoes can be transformed by the gratin treatment. The super-fresh aspect makes gratins especially tantalizing once you start to feel a little bored by the vegetables that tasted so new just weeks ago. A steamed artichoke is always a thing of satisfying beauty, but if you pare it to its heart, combine it with many more and bake them with green garlic and cheese, you get a whole new taste sensation.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | April 9, 2008
Herb-crusted lamb steaks served on a bed of creamy spinach is a perfect dish for any weeknight. Tender, juicy lamb steaks are cut through the leg to make a piece of meat 3/4 -inch to 1-inch thick with a slice of bone in the center. If you don't see it in the meat case, ask the butcher to cut it for you. Lamb goes best with Spanish rioja. Florentine Lamb Serves 2 3 medium garlic cloves, crushed 2 teaspoons chopped dried rosemary 2 tablespoons plain bread crumbs salt and freshly ground pepper olive-oil spray 2 (6- to 7-ounce)
NEWS
By Joe Gray. and Joe Gray.,Chicago Tribune | September 12, 2007
A recent lunch with my former Italian instructor led to talk of good food and her memory of a favorite dish made by her mother. The dish sounded like a great candidate for a quick weeknight dinner, so I immediately asked for the recipe. Susan Pezzino said her Sicilian mother used to make this pasta dish using beefsteak tomatoes. The tomato is partially cored, stuffed, then baked. It then forms the sauce for pasta. She would serve it in individual baking dishes doused with olive oil and sprinkled with bread crumbs before baking.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | April 15, 2006
On Easter morning, my husband and I will rise early and hide a few dozen pale-hued eggs in our backyard. A couple of hours later, our two grandchildren will arrive. Like last April, when we held our first egg hunt for the children, we'll stand on the sidelines and watch the delight as the little ones discover the hidden eggs tucked under rocks, stashed in flower beds and not-so-well-hidden in the bushes. This scene, of course, will be repeated in countless yards around the country. Easter-egg searches and church services are on many families' schedules for Easter Sunday, and for those of us hosting lunch, there won't be much free time for cooking.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | July 31, 1991
Many of us can't understand the fascination with mint jelly on lamb. It is always too green, too wiggly, too fake.But even a cynic won't deny that the flavors of mint and lamb are as compatible as Bogie and Bacall. You've just got to find the right formula. Instead of mint jelly, think mint sauce. I worked with some adaptations of the classic Italian mint sauce -- a combination of fresh mint and parsley, bread crumbs, vinegar and olive oil -- and came up with a flavorful, sauce that can be as complementary to chicken or fish as it is to lamb.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun reporter | June 27, 2007
The Flexitarian Table By Peter Berley with Zoe Singer Vegetables By the Culinary Institute of America Lebhar-Friedman Books / 2007 / $40 Vegetables, the latest cookbook offering from the Culinary Institute of America, is a beautifully illustrated compendium of recipes chock-full of vegetables. It is not strictly vegetarian, but it celebrates vegetables and legumes. Besides basic information (what is bok choy) and advice (how to trim an artichoke bottom), it includes delightful dishes such as fennel-and-potato chowder and hazelnut romesco sauce (to accompany grilled vegetables)
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | June 13, 2007
The Best of Gourmet Sixty-Five Years, Sixty-Five Favorite Recipes Good Food for Good Times By Jamie Gwen with Lana Sills Powerline Publishing / 2007 / $24.95 This homespun book from Los Angeles-based chef Jamie Gwen, who has appeared on the Home Shopping Network and written two other cookbooks, is organized around celebration menus - sort of. Some of them, like the Birthday Bash Brunch - with gazpacho, ginger pancakes, the "Very Best Dutch Baby,"...
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