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NEWS
By Michael Kelly | April 11, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The president, it seems, has been taking himself seriously in his frequent references to himself as ''the repairer of the breach.'' Casting about for a legacy larger than family leave, a news subject grander than grand juries, he has lighted upon the subject of race.In February, he asked Erskine Bowles to take time off from his compassionate efforts for poor ol' Webb and figure out what to do about the difficulties between white people and black people in this country. And now the president is going to take some actions.
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NEWS
September 23, 2014
There's simply no excuse for the Secret Service to have allowed an apparently deranged man to vault over the White House fence on Friday then sprint across the lawn and actually enter the president's residence through an unlocked door before he was tackled and apprehended. Heads should roll for a breach of security of this magnitude at what ought to be one of the country's most heavily guarded facilities. But it shouldn't come at the expense of the public's access to a historic site that symbolizes the nation's tradition of open governance and accountability to the citizens it serves.
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NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | May 26, 2006
Last year, Congress gave the federal government a D+ in computer security. Even worse, the Department of Homeland Security, the agency responsible for tracking digital security breaches, got an F. So did the Department of Veterans Affairs, where an employee this month compromised the Social Security numbers of up to 26.5 million veterans and their spouses after burglars stole a laptop and discs from an analyst's Montgomery County home. In the VA case, the midlevel worker did not have permission to remove the material from VA offices.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Consumers who shopped this summer at Shoppers Food & Pharmacy, which has 20 Baltimore-area stores, could have been victims of credit card data theft, owner Supervalu Inc. said. The Minnesota-based retailer, which owns Shoppers and other U.S. supermarket chains such as Farm Fresh and Shop 'n Save, alerted customers it had a breach in the computer network that processes payment cards at some of its stores. Account numbers, expiration dates and/or cardholders' names could have been stolen, although the company has not determined whether any thefts occurred.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 16, 2007
In its own deliciously dogged manner, Breach tells the story of the capture of super-spy Robert Hanssen from what looks, at first, like the wrong end of the telescope. Writer-director Billy Ray doesn't try to dazzle you with the scope of Hanssen's treachery. He focuses on how this man could operate for decades as an enemy within, rising to the top rung of American counterintelligence experts. By the end, the movie has planted a big nightmare in your brain that won't leave you at the crack of dawn.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | February 4, 2009
A security breach at a major credit card payment processor has prompted more than two dozen banks nationwide - including Baltimore-based Provident Bank - to notify customers that their credit and debit card numbers might have been compromised. Provident sent new cards to customers last week with a letter stating that it has "been advised of a very large data breach impacting millions of credit and debit card numbers." Only those customers who received letters and replacement cards sent last week were affected, said Dana Jung, Provident's manager of business continuity and customer information security.
NEWS
By San Francisco Chronicle | September 8, 1995
Rogue computer experts have tampered with America Online's business and customer information files, creating a security breach that could affect the accounts of subscribers to the giant on-line service.A spokeswoman with the on-line service confirmed that the company has a security problem but would not disclose details of recent problems out of concern that any information could be used by hackers against the company's computer network.But sources associated with the company said that the hackers appeared to have obtained access to a wide variety of files, including the personal files of Steve Case, the company's president and chief executive.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 22, 2007
LONDON -- The British government struggled yesterday to explain its loss of computer discs containing detailed personal information on 25 million Britons, including an unknown number of bank account identifiers, in what analysts described as potentially the most significant privacy breach of the digital era. It has defended its decision not to reveal the loss until Tuesday, 10 days after it had been informed, saying banks had asked for time to put heightened...
NEWS
By Michael Sragow | June 10, 2007
BREACH -- Universal / 29.98 A key question of post-Sept. 11 life - "Whom can you trust?" - receives quietly horrifying treatment in Breach, the real-life tale of an espionage case that unfolded early in 2001 and that would have dominated headlines for many months had it not been for Sept. 11. Robert Hanssen spent 22 of his 25 years in the FBI divulging secrets to the U.S.S.R. and then to the new Russia. He passed along the names of KGB agents on the U.S. payroll as well as emergency protocols for relocating the president.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | January 14, 1994
A U.S. District Court jury in Baltimore ordered national insurance broker Alexander & Alexander Services Inc. yesterday to pay $9.9 million for breach of contract in a plan to sell a workers' compensation package to fast-food restaurants.In its civil suit against the Owings Mills insurer, Preferred Employers Group Inc. of Florida claimed that Alexander stole its plan to market a workers' compensation program tailored for Burger King and other fast-food chains."A large company often gets this feeling it can do anything it wants to do because it's bigger," said Gerson Mehlman, attorney for PEGI.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Customers who dined at P.F. Chang's China Bistro at the Inner Harbor during two months this spring may be victims of debit and credit card data theft, the Scottsdale-based chain warned Monday in an announcement of a widespread security breach at 33 U.S. locations. PF. Chang's was alerted to a possible breach on June 10 by the U.S. Secret Service and launched a still-ongoing investigation. The company said it had the problem contained by the next day and has been processing credit and debit cards securely since June 11. Chang's said its card processing system was breached.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2014
SafeNet, an data encryption company based in Harford County, announced Thursday the appointment of Prakash Panjwani as president and CEO. The 12-year SafeNet veteran most recently served as vice president and general manager of the company's data protection branch. Panjani's tenure comes at a crucial time for the information-protection industry, the company said. In January, more than 309,000 identities were exposed in an February breach at the University of Maryland. P.F. Chang's became the latest U.S. company to investigate a major credit card breach Tuesday.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
The University of Maryland, College Park suffered a second cyberattack on the heels of the recent theft of personal data for hundreds of thousands of students, staff and alumni, university officials announced Thursday. Ann G. Wylie, who chairs a newly formed task force on cybersecurity, wrote in a note to the campus community that the personal information of "one senior university official" had been compromised in a breach Saturday. Wylie said the breach was "unrelated" to last month's cyberattack, in which a database with the Social Security numbers, dates of birth, names and other information of nearly 300,000 was invaded by hackers.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
Names and Social Security numbers of about 9,700 Marylanders with disabilities were exposed when a hacker breached a state contractor's computer systems in October, state health officials said Monday. The breach of Service Coordination Inc. involved a document that contained information on 70 percent of its clients, a company spokesperson said. The document also included clients' medical assistance numbers, Medicaid status, demographics and other information related to their case management.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
In the two weeks between recent revelations that hackers stole data on students, alumni and faculty from the University of Maryland, College Park and the Johns Hopkins University, nearly 360,000 records were swiped in similar attacks at schools in Pennsylvania, Indiana and North Dakota. Online thieves have increasingly sought sensitive or otherwise valuable data from educational institutions, experts say. Last year alone, breaches included possible exposure of 2.5 million Social Security and bank account numbers associated with an Arizona community college system, 74,000 Social Security numbers of University of Delaware students and staff, and 145,000 applications to Virginia Tech, according to the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
Names, email addresses and phone numbers from about 850 current and former Johns Hopkins University biomedical engineering students were posted online Thursday, stolen by someone claiming to be part of the hacker group known as Anonymous. The breached server did not contain Social Security or credit card numbers, or any other data that would make identity theft a concern, university spokesman Dennis O'Shea said. The hacker was attempting to extort the university for further access to its servers, threatening to post the information online unless officials handed over server passwords, O'Shea said.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN REPORTER | March 28, 2008
When a Maryland dental HMO acknowledged this week that it had accidentally posted the names, addresses and Social Security numbers of 75,000 members on its Web site, the revelation made news. But the security breach at The Dental Network is just one of more than three dozen filed so far this year with the Maryland attorney general's office, The Sun has learned. And though most of the security breaches are much smaller, they underscore how hard it is to completely protect computerized information.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 9, 2003
The space shuttle Columbia was not the first to have superheated gas invade its left wing on re-entering Earth's atmosphere, according to documents released yesterday by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. In 2000, the documents show, the shuttle Atlantis went into orbit with a quarter-inch breach in the wing's leading edge, allowing blowtorch-hot plasma into the wing on re-entry. But unlike the accident that destroyed Columbia on Feb. 1 and killed its crew of seven, the incident resulted in only minor damage, leaving the wing's inner structure intact.
NEWS
February 24, 2014
Hackers who stole confidential information on more than 309,000 current and former students and faculty from computers at the University of Maryland College Park last week had to penetrate multiple layers of security to get at the data, and school officials still don't know exactly how they did it or who they were. The sophisticated attack, which compromised Social Security numbers, birth dates, university ID numbers and other personal information, was a stark reminder of how vulnerable the nation's institutions are. School officials moved quickly to respond to the breach, which apparently took place sometime between 4 a.m. and 5 a.m. Tuesday and was discovered by staffers a few hours later.
NEWS
January 22, 2014
Public employees have a right to be represented by a union and to collective bargaining in states like Maryland where the law allows it. And the only way such a system can work - at least on a practical level - is to require all those government workers represented by the union to pay for the costs of the bargaining that makes those benefits possible. Such an arrangement is commonplace and reasonable, yet it's being challenged in a lawsuit heard Tuesday by the U.S. Supreme Court.
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