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BUSINESS
August 22, 1996
Gaithersburg-based OncorMed Inc., which markets genetic tests for diseases, said yesterday that it has obtained the rights to use information about certain genetic mutations linked to breast cancer to improve its tests for cancer.The mutations were discovered by University of California researchers.OncorMed officials declined to disclose how much the company paid the university for the rights to use the discovery. But Oncor-Med executives said the discovery will be used to broaden the number of gene mutations that the company's test for detecting breast cancer, called the BRCA1 test, can spot.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Some women at high risk for breast cancer because of an inherited gene mutation, including actress Angelina Jolie, are choosing to have preventive double mastectomies. Other women who have cancer in one breast are asking their doctors to remove the other breast removed out of caution. Whatever the reason, more women are having both breasts removed in response to cancer or a cancer threat. Dr. David Euhus, chief of breast surgery in the division of surgical oncology at Johns Hopkins Hospital, explains the trend and what happens after.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 21, 1995
A British-American team has apparently wrapped up the mystery of inherited breast cancer, isolating a second gene that causes the disorder and thereby opening the door for increased screening in susceptible families.Like the first breast cancer gene, called BRCA1 and identified in September 1994, the newly discovered gene is thought to be responsible for about half of all inherited cases of breast cancer, which total as many as 18,000 cases per year.Women who inherit the gene, called BRCA2, have an 85 percent risk of developing breast cancer -- the same risk as with BRCA1.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 15, 2013
Actress Angelina Jolie, who got a double mastectomy to lower her chances of breast cancer, will also have her ovaries removed, according to People magazine. Jolie said in a New York Times editorial Tuesday that she had her breasts removed and reconstructed because she has a gene mutation that makes her risk of breast cancer high. Women with the BRCA1 gene mutation also have a high chance of developing ovarian cancer. There is no test to detect ovarian cancer and women often die from the disease because it is diagnosed in the late stages.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 15, 2013
Actress Angelina Jolie, who got a double mastectomy to lower her chances of breast cancer, will also have her ovaries removed, according to People magazine. Jolie said in a New York Times editorial Tuesday that she had her breasts removed and reconstructed because she has a gene mutation that makes her risk of breast cancer high. Women with the BRCA1 gene mutation also have a high chance of developing ovarian cancer. There is no test to detect ovarian cancer and women often die from the disease because it is diagnosed in the late stages.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | January 11, 2012
Researchers at Johns Hopkins and the University of Michigan have discovered an inherited mutation linked to significantly higher risk of prostate cancer development at a younger age. The discovery, after two decades of looking, provides insight into the disease development. And though those with the mutation comprise just a fraction of the 240,000 new cases diagnosed annually, the discovery could also help doctors determine who needs earlier screening. The discovery is the first major genetic variant found for inherited prostate cancer, said Dr. Kathleen A. Cooney, professor of internal medicine and urology at the Michigan Medical School and a senior author of the study, which was published in the New England Journal of Medicine . The study found that those with a family history of prostate cancer were much more likely to have the mutation, and that gave them a 10-20 higher risk of developing the disease themselves.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Some women at high risk for breast cancer because of an inherited gene mutation, including actress Angelina Jolie, are choosing to have preventive double mastectomies. Other women who have cancer in one breast are asking their doctors to remove the other breast removed out of caution. Whatever the reason, more women are having both breasts removed in response to cancer or a cancer threat. Dr. David Euhus, chief of breast surgery in the division of surgical oncology at Johns Hopkins Hospital, explains the trend and what happens after.
NEWS
By Steven L. Salzberg | November 9, 2010
A battle is under way over who owns our genes. Each of us has about 25,000 of them, stored in every cell in our body. Our genes are 99 percent identical from one individual to the next. The small differences in the remaining 1 percent of our DNA account for all the remarkable diversity in the human race. Thanks to advances in biotechnology, in the not-too-distant future we'll be able to carry our DNA sequences around with us, perhaps stored on a mini-flash drive or on our smartphones.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1997
OncorMed Inc., a Gaithersburg biotechnology company, said yesterday that it has been issued U.S. patent rights to the genetic blueprint for the gene that controls a protein implicated in the inherited risk for breast cancer.Specifically, OncorMed received U.S. patent protection on the genetic code for what's known as the BRCA1 gene.Inherited abnormalities in the BRCA1 gene, and in another gene known as BRCA2, are associated with elevated risks for breast cancer, according to medical experts.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 25, 1998
SEATTLE -- Women who don't have a strong family history of breast cancer should not worry about being tested for one of the major breast-cancer genes, University of Washington researchers reported yesterday.In the study, only 2.6 percent of women who already had the disease were found to have a defective BRCA1 gene, linked to breast and ovarian cancer.Statistically, one in eight women in the United States develops breast cancer; experts estimate the disease will kill more than 43,500 this year.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | January 11, 2012
Researchers at Johns Hopkins and the University of Michigan have discovered an inherited mutation linked to significantly higher risk of prostate cancer development at a younger age. The discovery, after two decades of looking, provides insight into the disease development. And though those with the mutation comprise just a fraction of the 240,000 new cases diagnosed annually, the discovery could also help doctors determine who needs earlier screening. The discovery is the first major genetic variant found for inherited prostate cancer, said Dr. Kathleen A. Cooney, professor of internal medicine and urology at the Michigan Medical School and a senior author of the study, which was published in the New England Journal of Medicine . The study found that those with a family history of prostate cancer were much more likely to have the mutation, and that gave them a 10-20 higher risk of developing the disease themselves.
NEWS
By Steven L. Salzberg | November 9, 2010
A battle is under way over who owns our genes. Each of us has about 25,000 of them, stored in every cell in our body. Our genes are 99 percent identical from one individual to the next. The small differences in the remaining 1 percent of our DNA account for all the remarkable diversity in the human race. Thanks to advances in biotechnology, in the not-too-distant future we'll be able to carry our DNA sequences around with us, perhaps stored on a mini-flash drive or on our smartphones.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1996
Gaithersburg-based OncorMed Inc., which markets genetic tests for diseases, said yesterday that it has obtained the rights to use information about certain genetic mutations linked to breast cancer to improve its tests for cancer.The mutations were discovered by University of California researchers.OncorMed officials declined to disclose how much the company paid the university for the rights to use the discovery. But Oncor-Med executives said the discovery will be used to broaden the number of gene mutations that the company's test for detecting breast cancer, called the BRCA1 test, can spot.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 21, 1995
A British-American team has apparently wrapped up the mystery of inherited breast cancer, isolating a second gene that causes the disorder and thereby opening the door for increased screening in susceptible families.Like the first breast cancer gene, called BRCA1 and identified in September 1994, the newly discovered gene is thought to be responsible for about half of all inherited cases of breast cancer, which total as many as 18,000 cases per year.Women who inherit the gene, called BRCA2, have an 85 percent risk of developing breast cancer -- the same risk as with BRCA1.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Medical Tribune News Service | April 25, 1995
Late last year, an international team of researchers forged a breakthrough in the fight against breast cancer, with its discovery of two genes -- BRCA1 and BRCA2 -- that are linked to an inherited form of breast and ovarian cancer.Although for most cancer patients the news will have little direct significance, it is hoped that the discovery of the aberrant genes TC will lead scientists to genes that play a critical role in causing more common forms of the disease. Breast cancer kills 46,000 women each year in the United States alone.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 3, 1995
A gene that was thought to cause only a small proportion of breast cancers now appears to be at the heart of nearly all of them, researchers report.The finding may lead to new ways to give a prognosis and to treat breast cancer, but there is no immediate action recommended for women who have breast cancer or are concerned about a genetic predisposition to the disease.Researchers are excited about the finding because it means that the rare forms of breast cancer that run in families appear to be not distinct from the most common forms of breast cancer, but instead linked to them.
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