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Brave New World

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By RICHARD REEVES | March 28, 1994
Berkeley, California.--Clay Felker, the man who invented New York magazine and a lot of what came to be known as new journalism, is spending this season teaching at the University of California. So I asked him what he thought was the best new magazine in the country.''Wired,'' he answered.Great. I never heard of it.It turns out that there are a lot of things I don't know about. Cyberspace is one of my recent discoveries. Tens of millions of people around this brave new world may be living there, but not me.Cyberspace, of which electronic mail and conversation by computer were the first and simplest examples, is new terrain, a change in the way people interact that can be compared with the social and personal revolutions brought by railroads or the telegraph or television.
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NEWS
April 19, 2013
Regardless of whether a man or woman joins an international organization like al-Qaida or simply acts alone, terrorism has wended its hellish way into the very fiber of our society ("At least 3 dead, scores injured in Boston blasts," April 16). So this the brave new world. The concepts behind terrorism are entirely antithetical to the rules and strictures our country was founded on. America has become the hunted, not the hunter. There are thousands of anti-Americans, mercenaries, and religious zealots who despise America, and all for which it stands.
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NEWS
By HAL PIPER | February 5, 1994
Some say the world will end in fire; some say in ice. Aldous Huxley voted for fire, George Orwell for ice.Huxley and Orwell both knew, as we all know, that the world is in sorry shape and geting worse. Both looked into the bleak future and wrote powerful novels describing the death of civilization. The titles, ''Brave New World'' and ''1984,'' have entered the language as terrifying synecdoches for the horrors and tribulations spawned by progress and bureaucrats, and the adjective ''Orwellian,'' meaning ''nightmarish,'' or at least ''displeasing,'' is used by millions who have never read a word Orwell wrote.
NEWS
By Susan Salter Reynolds and Susan Salter Reynolds,Los Angeles Times | March 23, 2008
A writer's ideas are his legacy. After he dies, it's up to executors, heirs, lawyers, agents and colleagues to keep them alive -- and perhaps especially up to us, the readers, to thread those ideas through the weave of history, the passage of time, our own lives. Writers are the most potent of ghosts. Their spirits lodge in our quotidian decisions; we turn to them in times of change and times of terror. When their wisdom is unavailable, our choices get harder. Aldous Huxley -- born in England in 1894, visionary author of 11 novels (most famously Brave New World, in 1932)
NEWS
By Susan Salter Reynolds and Susan Salter Reynolds,Los Angeles Times | March 23, 2008
A writer's ideas are his legacy. After he dies, it's up to executors, heirs, lawyers, agents and colleagues to keep them alive -- and perhaps especially up to us, the readers, to thread those ideas through the weave of history, the passage of time, our own lives. Writers are the most potent of ghosts. Their spirits lodge in our quotidian decisions; we turn to them in times of change and times of terror. When their wisdom is unavailable, our choices get harder. Aldous Huxley -- born in England in 1894, visionary author of 11 novels (most famously Brave New World, in 1932)
NEWS
April 19, 2013
Regardless of whether a man or woman joins an international organization like al-Qaida or simply acts alone, terrorism has wended its hellish way into the very fiber of our society ("At least 3 dead, scores injured in Boston blasts," April 16). So this the brave new world. The concepts behind terrorism are entirely antithetical to the rules and strictures our country was founded on. America has become the hunted, not the hunter. There are thousands of anti-Americans, mercenaries, and religious zealots who despise America, and all for which it stands.
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | January 22, 2007
Prediction: The new, hot thing in our future will be anonymity. To be unfamous. To be Googled - and to not be there. No link. No Wiki. No tube, space or face. No nothing. It's too late for most adults - anyone with a job, a driver's license or a signature on a public document. But in a world where anyone can be known, what could be cooler than not being known? In a celebrity-saturated culture, what could be hotter than not being a celebrity? You may have noticed that celebrity ain't what it used to be. Where there was once hard work and accomplishment behind one's being awarded celebrity status, today one need only wake up, plug in the video cam and hit a button.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 10, 2002
NEW YORK - Against a setting sun, a clarinetist blows fiercely into his instrument, the sound more anguished cry than musical note. Dancers, moving as slowly as a dream, climb atop a tomb-like vessel piled high with dark, pebbly dirt, alternately burying themselves in it and rising defiantly atop it. Premiering just blocks from where the World Trade Center towers were reduced to rubble by the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the dance's point of reference is as immediate as it is haunting. Offering, a new piece by the avant-garde dancers Eiko and Koma, is just one of scores of works to emerge this past year as artists seek to give shape to the vast range of emotions that the event triggered.
SPORTS
April 4, 1995
Players and owners finally agreed on something yesterday, finalizing back-to-work rules for this season:RULES/SALARY INFO* Rosters to be expanded to 28 players until May 15.* Pitchers will be eligible for a win after pitching three innings -- rather than the usual five -- until May 9.* Free-agent team based in Homestead, Fla., will be allowed to participate in exhibition games.* Players' pay will be prorated to reflect loss of 18 games, or 11 percent of their 1995 pay. Players yet to sign will be paid on a basis of 144 games and 162 days of service.
NEWS
July 31, 1992
In 1990, 2,200 Americans died while awaiting organ transplants. This year, 600 Americans will perish because of a shortage of transplantable hearts. And last year in Uruguay, in a case that underscored the poverty of the perpetrators as much as the dire need for human organs, 20 people were accused of illegally selling their own kidneys.Doctors and potential transplant recipients worldwide have decried the organ shortage. That's why the recent baboon-to-human liver transplant in Pittsburgh has drawn international attention.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Sun reporter | March 16, 2008
CELEBRATION CITY, Fla. -- One-by-one, the Atlanta Braves stars walk off the field as the kids in the stands scream "Chipper" and "Tex" and "Mr. McCann." The nonroster invitee to Atlanta's camp tries to duck out of sight, but these autograph seekers are prepared. It has been five years since he has worn this uniform, but he's unmistakable. There's that bow-legged gait, that slightly dazed smile and that No. 8 on the back of the Braves uniform that he wore for more than a decade "Javy!
NEWS
By ANDREW RATNER | December 2, 2007
After sorting through scores of videos prepared for last week's CNN/YouTube debate from the likes of a talking paper bag, immigrant sock puppets, Sparkles the Clown and a man dressed as Frankenstein, a mainstream journalist - me - thought back to the precious Saturday Night Live parody of the 1988 presidential debate between the first George Bush, played by Dana Carvey, and Michael S. Dukakis, portrayed by Jon Lovitz. Bush: "Let me sum up. On track, stay the course. Thousand points of light."
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | January 22, 2007
Prediction: The new, hot thing in our future will be anonymity. To be unfamous. To be Googled - and to not be there. No link. No Wiki. No tube, space or face. No nothing. It's too late for most adults - anyone with a job, a driver's license or a signature on a public document. But in a world where anyone can be known, what could be cooler than not being known? In a celebrity-saturated culture, what could be hotter than not being a celebrity? You may have noticed that celebrity ain't what it used to be. Where there was once hard work and accomplishment behind one's being awarded celebrity status, today one need only wake up, plug in the video cam and hit a button.
NEWS
By ABIGAIL TUCKER and ABIGAIL TUCKER,SUN REPORTER | November 15, 2005
Welcome Back, Kotter and Wonder Woman. Perfect Strangers and Pinky and the Brain. Sure, the TV series themselves are a little dated, but they'll air in a revolutionary way this winter when America Online offers them on the Internet, on demand and for free. For media companies, AOL's new service, In2TV, pioneers a fresh source of advertising revenue from about 100 classic programs, some of which have been shelved for years. For couch potatoes, the new service is not just an opportunity to relive the glory days of Maverick and Eight Is Enough.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 10, 2002
NEW YORK - Against a setting sun, a clarinetist blows fiercely into his instrument, the sound more anguished cry than musical note. Dancers, moving as slowly as a dream, climb atop a tomb-like vessel piled high with dark, pebbly dirt, alternately burying themselves in it and rising defiantly atop it. Premiering just blocks from where the World Trade Center towers were reduced to rubble by the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the dance's point of reference is as immediate as it is haunting. Offering, a new piece by the avant-garde dancers Eiko and Koma, is just one of scores of works to emerge this past year as artists seek to give shape to the vast range of emotions that the event triggered.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2002
Games Workshop has always done business, quite literally, in a world of its own. Two worlds, to be more precise: one populated by elves, ogres and rat-men, the other by futuristic Space Marines and the Dark Eldar army. Games Workshop created those two worlds for War- hammer and Warhammer 40,000, table-top battle games that have built the company into a $135 million-a-year global enterprise. It makes thousands of metal soldiers who live and fight in them. It publishes a magazine, even novels about them.
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