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By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1999
An Anne Arundel County Circuit judge has refused to shorten the two consecutive life terms of a convicted double-murderer, saying that despite testimony about Larry Michael Bratt's accomplishments in prison, "It would defy common sense and logic for Mr. Bratt to have any part of his sentence reduced."Judge Clayton Greene Jr. said Bratt's bid to shorten his prison stay for ordering the Dec. 19, 1981, slayings of John and Donna Carback in their Pasadena home "shows that he has chutzpah.""He's criticizing him for asking for what he is entitled to ask for?
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
A California company that helps aspiring authors was moving when an editor noticed a bulky envelope from a Maryland prison in a box of unsolicited manuscripts. Inside were loose pages of a children's book about a girl who wants to celebrate her birthday by flying kites in a prison yard with her incarcerated father. The story had typos and plot problems - but also potential, recalled Ralph Scott of Too Nuts Productions. The envelope came from prisoner No. 168687, Larry Bratt, a childless man serving two life sentences in the Jessup state correctional institute for arranging a double murder in 1981.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2000
For the second time in four months, convicted killer Larry Michael Bratt asked an Anne Arundel County Circuit Court yesterday to substantially trim his two consecutive life sentences, saying he is a changed man -- a statement disputed by prosecutors. "The answer actually lies in the fact that the system actually worked for me," Bratt, a few weeks shy of his 48th birthday, told a panel of judges. "I've discovered, I can't say for everyone, but for me, my ego was my worst enemy. I would delude myself at times.
NEWS
September 9, 2007
Wesley J. Fuller, a retired American Telephone & Telegraph Co. accountant, died of a heart attack Thursday at a hospital in Marietta, Ga. He was 65. Mr. Fuller was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1960, he served in the Navy for four years. The former Shrewsbury, Pa., and Stewartstown, Pa., resident worked as an AT&T accountant in Hunt Valley for many years before being transferred to Atlanta in 1984. The Woodstock, Ga., resident, who enjoyed hunting and fishing, retired in 1987.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2000
A panel of Anne Arundel County judges has decided against trimming the two life sentences of Larry Bratt, convicted in 1983 of killing a couple in their Pasadena home. It was the second setback in a week for Bratt, who also lost a bid to have the Court of Special Appeals accept another appeal of his conviction and sentence. In December, another Anne Arundel judge refused to shorten the sentence. In a short opinion, the county judges wrote that they could not consider claims that Bratt "has made productive use of his time working towards rehabilitating himself and others," as their job was to look at the sentence imposed in 1983 by Judge Raymond G. Thieme Jr. The two life terms, the judges said, were appropriate under the circumstances.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2001
As Hollywood breakups go, the media frenzy over the recent Julia Roberts-Benjamin Bratt split was not unusual. There were the rumors of a Roberts liaison with George Clooney and speculation that she may not be the marrying kind at all. But the many magazine cover stories and newspaper clips drew a common conclusion when analyzing the breakup of Hollywood's golden couple - Roberts brought it on by reportedly refusing to cut back on work and focus more...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 13, 1997
SAN FRANCISCO -- Eight months after vowing to overhaul its troubled citizenship program, the Immigration and Naturalization Service is still struggling to put new procedures in place to prevent immigrants with criminal records from becoming citizens.Two highly publicized efforts by the agency failed to fix a system that naturalized 180,000 immigrants last year without proper criminal-background checks.At one point, auditors found that only one of 23 field offices under review was following the new orders.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1997
It's the kind of case that gives used-car dealers a bad name.Fifteen dealers and mechanics and three state motor vehicles employees allegedly conspired to purchase thousands of high-mileage cars, roll-back their odometers and then resell them to unsuspecting customers around the country, court records show.Yesterday, prosecutors and defense attorneys gave jurors in federal court in Baltimore their accounts of the case, sparring over whether alleged members of the interstate ring should be convicted of a series of crimes, ranging from conspiracy to money laundering.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1999
"Homicide: Life On the Street" may be more cutting-edge, and "NYPD Blue" may have Dennis Franz, but no drama on television is more consistently engrossing than NBC's "Law & Order."The best drama on TV? Tough to say, and in Baltimore, suggesting a New York-based cop show is better than our beloved "Homicide" constitutes fighting words (hey, I watch 'em both).But there's no denying it's hung around longer than the competition. Tonight at 10 on WBAL, Channel 11, "L&O" celebrates its 200th episode with a guest turn from Julia Roberts, playing a woman with information on a homicide she'll entrust only to Det. Rey Curtis (Benjamin Bratt, Roberts' real-life boyfriend)
NEWS
September 9, 2007
Wesley J. Fuller, a retired American Telephone & Telegraph Co. accountant, died of a heart attack Thursday at a hospital in Marietta, Ga. He was 65. Mr. Fuller was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1960, he served in the Navy for four years. The former Shrewsbury, Pa., and Stewartstown, Pa., resident worked as an AT&T accountant in Hunt Valley for many years before being transferred to Atlanta in 1984. The Woodstock, Ga., resident, who enjoyed hunting and fishing, retired in 1987.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2001
As Hollywood breakups go, the media frenzy over the recent Julia Roberts-Benjamin Bratt split was not unusual. There were the rumors of a Roberts liaison with George Clooney and speculation that she may not be the marrying kind at all. But the many magazine cover stories and newspaper clips drew a common conclusion when analyzing the breakup of Hollywood's golden couple - Roberts brought it on by reportedly refusing to cut back on work and focus more...
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2000
A panel of Anne Arundel County judges has decided against trimming the two life sentences of Larry Bratt, convicted in 1983 of killing a couple in their Pasadena home. It was the second setback in a week for Bratt, who also lost a bid to have the Court of Special Appeals accept another appeal of his conviction and sentence. In December, another Anne Arundel judge refused to shorten the sentence. In a short opinion, the county judges wrote that they could not consider claims that Bratt "has made productive use of his time working towards rehabilitating himself and others," as their job was to look at the sentence imposed in 1983 by Judge Raymond G. Thieme Jr. The two life terms, the judges said, were appropriate under the circumstances.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2000
For the second time in four months, convicted killer Larry Michael Bratt asked an Anne Arundel County Circuit Court yesterday to substantially trim his two consecutive life sentences, saying he is a changed man -- a statement disputed by prosecutors. "The answer actually lies in the fact that the system actually worked for me," Bratt, a few weeks shy of his 48th birthday, told a panel of judges. "I've discovered, I can't say for everyone, but for me, my ego was my worst enemy. I would delude myself at times.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1999
An Anne Arundel County Circuit judge has refused to shorten the two consecutive life terms of a convicted double-murderer, saying that despite testimony about Larry Michael Bratt's accomplishments in prison, "It would defy common sense and logic for Mr. Bratt to have any part of his sentence reduced."Judge Clayton Greene Jr. said Bratt's bid to shorten his prison stay for ordering the Dec. 19, 1981, slayings of John and Donna Carback in their Pasadena home "shows that he has chutzpah.""He's criticizing him for asking for what he is entitled to ask for?
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1999
"Homicide: Life On the Street" may be more cutting-edge, and "NYPD Blue" may have Dennis Franz, but no drama on television is more consistently engrossing than NBC's "Law & Order."The best drama on TV? Tough to say, and in Baltimore, suggesting a New York-based cop show is better than our beloved "Homicide" constitutes fighting words (hey, I watch 'em both).But there's no denying it's hung around longer than the competition. Tonight at 10 on WBAL, Channel 11, "L&O" celebrates its 200th episode with a guest turn from Julia Roberts, playing a woman with information on a homicide she'll entrust only to Det. Rey Curtis (Benjamin Bratt, Roberts' real-life boyfriend)
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1997
It's the kind of case that gives used-car dealers a bad name.Fifteen dealers and mechanics and three state motor vehicles employees allegedly conspired to purchase thousands of high-mileage cars, roll-back their odometers and then resell them to unsuspecting customers around the country, court records show.Yesterday, prosecutors and defense attorneys gave jurors in federal court in Baltimore their accounts of the case, sparring over whether alleged members of the interstate ring should be convicted of a series of crimes, ranging from conspiracy to money laundering.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
A California company that helps aspiring authors was moving when an editor noticed a bulky envelope from a Maryland prison in a box of unsolicited manuscripts. Inside were loose pages of a children's book about a girl who wants to celebrate her birthday by flying kites in a prison yard with her incarcerated father. The story had typos and plot problems - but also potential, recalled Ralph Scott of Too Nuts Productions. The envelope came from prisoner No. 168687, Larry Bratt, a childless man serving two life sentences in the Jessup state correctional institute for arranging a double murder in 1981.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 13, 1997
SAN FRANCISCO -- Eight months after vowing to overhaul its troubled citizenship program, the Immigration and Naturalization Service is still struggling to put new procedures in place to prevent immigrants with criminal records from becoming citizens.Two highly publicized efforts by the agency failed to fix a system that naturalized 180,000 immigrants last year without proper criminal-background checks.At one point, auditors found that only one of 23 field offices under review was following the new orders.
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